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Camelback Locomotive Specifications

Data courtesy Steve Llanso, Sweat House Media © 2008

Atlantic City Class (Locobase #2562)

Class Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1027
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1896
Cylinders(2) 13" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 22" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter84
Tractive Effort13182
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers79000
Locomotive Weight142900
The recently developed Atlantic wheel arrangement permitted larger fireboxes behind the drivers. When the railroad in question was burning anthracite, which needed even bigger grates, the result was the Camelback. Camelbacks separated the engine crew, putting the engineer high on the boiler and over the drivers and the fireman behind the huge Wooten firebox. This ACR engine was a Vauclain compound in which the high and low pressure cylinders shared a common valve gear.

The result was a Flier, posting speeds of 90+ mph and averaging 71 mph between Philadelphia and Atlantic City. On one run in August 1897, 1027 averaged 69.3 mph pulling a train that carried 448 passengers.


Baltimore & Ohio (B&O) Class B-14 (Locobase #1110)

Class B-14 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1308-1313, 1319-1322
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1896
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure190
Driver Diameter78
Tractive Effort23741
Grate Area34.27
Weight on Drivers119070
Locomotive Weight154230
Sagle, 1964, comments: The high-wheel ten-wheelers ...were the 'glamour girls' of their type and were used on the Washington-Philadelphia run ...displacing the I-6, 4-4-0 ....Serving out their later days on such trains as the 'Frederick Local' must have been a great let down."

Summarized in a description of several locomotive classes recently delivered to the Baltimore & Ohio in American Engineer, Car Builder and Railroad Journal (AERJ) in 1895.

Sagle describes these as "Mother Hubbard" or camelbacks, but the AERJ article referred to above shows a conventional layout. These and the B-15s were delivered at the same time with the class totals given as 6 for this group and 4 for the other. (Sagle shows 5.)


Baltimore & Ohio (B&O) Class E-19A (Locobase #6564)

Class E-19A Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1766-1899, 1939-40. 59-65
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 21" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter55
Tractive Effort40893
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers166000
Locomotive Weight181400
Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection May 2005.

In the same year that the two E-18s were completed as Vanderbilt-firebox oddities (Locobase 4142), another 109 Camelbacks were delivered as Vauclain compounds. Seven more were supplied by Baldwin as simple engines in 1903.

By 1905, compounding was no longer seen as an answer and the entire class was converted to the configuration shown in the specs. As with all Wootten-type fireboxes, the ratios seem skewed but the overall performance is in the middle of the pack.


Central RR of New Jersey Class K-1 (Locobase #1222)

Class K-1 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers426-475
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 20" x 32"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter55
Tractive Effort39564
Grate Area82.4
Weight on Drivers159000
Locomotive Weight201000
Data from the 1899 Brooks catalogue.

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #3167-3181, produced in March 1899, 3331-3320 in October 1899, 3540-3554 in May 1900, 3820 in April 1901, 3957-3966 in September 1901.

Original 426-429 were later renumbered 441-444.

Original 441-444 were renumbered 451-454

Original 451-454 were renumbered 466-469

Original 466 was renumbered 480.

Original 467-469 were renumbered 477-479.

Locobase doesn't understand any of this ...

This camelback featured a wide Wooten firebox (123" long by 97" wide) for burning fine anthracite coal. Rumary-Lambert indicate that the first 15 later received 20" x 32" cylinders, but none of the other batches have the same comment.

The design was delivered with slide valves driven by inside Stephenson gear; drive was on the second coupled axle.

As rare in American service as was the Twelve-wheeler, the 4-8-0s in this large stud obviously suited the CNJ's hilly profile and anthracite fuel quite well. Later photographs indicate that this class was rebuilt with 11" piston valves and Baker valve gear and almost all of the class was superheated. (See Locobase 6724). About half were scrapped before World War II, while the other half served into the late 1940s.


Central RR of New Jersey Class P-6s (Locobase #5331)

Class P-6s Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers590-595
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 20.5" x 26"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter85
Tractive Effort22946
Grate Area82
Weight on Drivers99400
Locomotive Weight191000
Data from table in AERJ July 1903. Like all the other Atlantics on the CNJ, these were camelbacks with very tall drivers. Apparently successful, they endured until 1946-1947.

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #3951-3953 in August 1901 and numbered 588-590, renumbered 591-593 soon thereafter. Cannot tell about the other two.

http://www.insighting.co.uk/homauchchunk/steam_class.htm for photos and further comments.


Central RR of New Jersey Class L-5b/c/d/e (Locobase #5037)

Class L-5b/c/d/e Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers150-184
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 20" x 28"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort28974
Grate Area83.3
Weight on Drivers153000
Locomotive Weight201500
One of a series of Camelback Tenwheelers built for the Central of New Jersey, the L-5b sextet (169-174) is featured in the photo section of Bruce's The Steam Locomotive in America (1950). And it's a worthy representative of the type with the center cab wrapped around the boiler and the massive Wootten firebox showing its polished steel over the third driver.

As Bruce depicted the locomotive in its original, saturated-steam state, his data showed a total EHS of 2,512 sq ft. Locobase's specs reflect the data from CNJ 7 - 1944 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Superheaters for this class -- which had several subclassess -- were installed in the late 1920s and early 1930s for the most part, although a couple were refitted in the early 1920s.

Drury (1993) notes that the 111 Camelbacks "were essentially the same locomotive" and served as mixed-traffic engines into the 1950s.


Central RR of New Jersey Class D-9s (Locobase #5363)

Class D-9s Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers852-854 (later 557-559)
BuilderAlco-Brooks
Year Built1905
Cylinders(2) 19" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort23125
Grate Area81.6
Weight on Drivers111300
Locomotive Weight161300
Data from table in June 1906 AERJ. These camelbacks used the wide Wootten fireboxes to burn anthracite. According to Drury (1993), these were the heaviest Americans ever built. (He credits them with 173,600 lb, over 6 tons more than when built.) The last of their line (and the only class built after the turn of the century), the trio was retired in 1934.


Central RR of New Jersey Class L-6as / L-7s (Locobase #6726)

Class L-6as / L-7s Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers750-769
BuilderBaldwin
Year Built1910
Cylinders(2) 23" x 28"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort38318
Grate Area81.6
Weight on Drivers169000
Locomotive Weight225100
Data from CNJ 7 - 1944 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

A later batch of Camelback Ten-wheelers that arrived in two batches of 10 in 1910 and 1912, respectively. With no reason to replace these quite-satisfactory engines, their retirements only came in 1953-1954 at the end of steam.


Central RR of New Jersey Class L-7as (Locobase #6727)

Class L-7as Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers770-779
BuilderBaldwin
Year Built1913
Cylinders(2) 23" x 28"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort38318
Grate Area91.8
Weight on Drivers170900
Locomotive Weight225600
Data from CNJ 7 - 1944 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

A later batch of Camelback Ten-wheelers of the same power dimensions as the L-6as shown in Locobase 6726, but a grate that was widened a foot to 9 ft 1/4" . Interestingly, the enlargement of the grate resulted in only a very modest increase in firebox heating surface.


Central RR of New Jersey Class L-8s (Locobase #6463)

Class L-8s Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers780-787
BuilderBaldwin
Year Built1918
Cylinders(2) 23" x 28"
Boiler Pressure220
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort40143
Grate Area98
Weight on Drivers170800
Locomotive Weight225600
Data from CNJ 7 - 1944 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

And information from John McCoy Oct 10 1998, 12:00 am Newsgroups: misc.transport.rail.americas

From: igop ...@ix.netcom.com (John McCoy) Date: 1998/10/10 (accessed 13 March 2005).

Roster information from the Northeast Railroads website http://www.northeast.railfan.net/cnj_steam2.html (accessed 13 March 2005), which Locobase used to identify the class only generally referred to in McCoy's post. Given that only one 4-6-0 class reached 40,000 lb of tractive effort, it's likely that that group of 8 engines is the subject of McCoy's data. This was confirmed by the 1944 book, which showed a classic Camelback Ten-wheeler that must have been among the last of the type to be built. By this time the piston valves measured 13" in diameter.

This class was retired at the end of steam in 1950-1954.


Chicago & Eastern Illinois (C & EI) Class 170 (Locobase #3932)

Class 170 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers170-174 / 1700-1704
BuilderPittsburgh
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 21.5" x 33"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter54
Tractive Effort48023
Grate Area72
Weight on Drivers150000
Locomotive Weight189700
Clearly the Chicago & Eastern Illinois was searching for a heavy power formula. The preceding year had seen a 2-cylinder compound on the same 4-8-0 arrangement -- see #3933. Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 1800-1804 (December 1895). Although perhaps intended as compounds, they seem to have been delivered as simple-expansion locomotives.

Railroad Gazette (16 November 1900) discusses these large twelve-wheeler camelbacks, noting that unlike the eastern railroad engines with wide fireboxes, these locomotives burned bituminous run of mine coal. They had an unusually long stroke and, compared to the earlier compound, a larger boiler with more and longer tubes.


Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf (CRI & P) Class C-31 - camelback (Locobase #7230)

Class C-31 - camelback Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers151-162 / 1888-1899
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort31327
Grate Area70
Weight on Drivers149400
Locomotive Weight166300
Data from RI 1 - 1942 Locomotive Class & Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Rare camelback west of the Mississippi River. The C O & G bought these as a variation to the C-31s they'd purchased at the same time. After the Rock Island bought out the C O & G, their shops rebuilt some of the class as switchers with a conventional cab, sloped tender, and new boiler and grate.


Delaware & Hudson Class B-1 (Locobase #8377)

Class B-1 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers204-218
BuilderDickson
Year Built1886
Cylinders(2) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure145
Driver Diameter56.5
Tractive Effort16963
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers87000
Locomotive Weight100000
Data from D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This class was one of the first classes of camelbacks (the D & H called them "double-cabs") on the road. Although fitted with the wide Wootten firebox showing the center-boiler cab and eave over the fireman's footplate position, these engines were considerably smaller than those that would come to represent the type.

Dickson delivered the class over two years (plus the first - works#506 -- in 1886). Works #541-544, 586-589 came in 1887; the other 6 came in a batch - 622-627.


Delaware & Hudson Class T-1 // G-3 (Locobase #1176)

Class T-1 // G-3 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers421-426
BuilderD & H
Year Built1898
Cylinders(2) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure165
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort15806
Grate Area71.25
Weight on Drivers79400
Locomotive Weight116900
Data from D&HCo 1901 and D&H 1-1930 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Rebuilt by the D&H with double (camelback) cabs, Wooten firebox. Original builder and year:

421 Smith & Jackson 1871

422 Danforth & Cooke 1876

423-426 Dickson 1866-1867.

The 1901 book shows 209 boiler tubes, the 1930 edition credits the boiler with 211 small tubes.

Retired 1924 (421-22, 426), 1926 (423, 425), and 1935 (424).


Delaware & Hudson Class U / C-1m (Locobase #1158)

Class U / C-1m Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers270-274 / 119-123
BuilderD & H
Year Built1898
Cylinders(2) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure165
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort19133
Grate Area71.26
Weight on Drivers95900
Locomotive Weight111636
Data from D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

5 D&H rebuilds of "lump-burners" originally obtained from Dickinson in the 1860s (2), 1870s (2), and 1880 (1). In the process, they were converted to the "double-cab" (aka Mother Hubbard or Camelback). One sold out in 1917, the others were scrapped from November 1923 to August 1926.


Delaware & Hudson Class U-II // E-1a (Locobase #1165)

Class U-II // E-1a Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers705-711
BuilderDickson
Year Built1898
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort28414
Grate Area80.3
Weight on Drivers130000
Locomotive Weight150100
Data from D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Like the E-1s, these double cabs (camelbacks) were conversions of much older engines, two Danforth & Cooke engines of 1864, and a Dickson of 1867. Dickson also built four more in 1898 to the same specs. All seven operated until 1927-1928.


Delaware & Hudson Class E-1 (Locobase #1164)

Class E-1 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers702-704
BuilderD & H
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure170
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort26836
Grate Area32
Weight on Drivers130000
Locomotive Weight150100
Richard Cooper (in Shaughnessy, 1997) notes that these double cabs (camelbacks) were D&H conversions of a 4-4-0 (Schenectady, 1867) and 2 Moguls (Dickson, 1881). They operated until the 1920s, the ex-Moguls being scrapped in 1926-1927.


Delaware & Hudson Class V-1/V-2 // G-4e/f (Locobase #1180)

Class V-1/V-2 // G-4e/f Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers427-437
BuilderD & H
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 19" x 24"
Boiler Pressure175
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort18678
Grate Area80
Weight on Drivers90300
Locomotive Weight129100
Data from D&H 1-1930 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Double (camelback) cabs. Firebox heating surface included 104 sq ft of "water bars".

V-Is were two rebuilds by the Green Island shops, one built at Oneonta and one at Carbondale. Out of service in 1926 (433-434) and 1930 (432, 435).

V-IIs were four Green Island new-builds of 1900-1901. Lighter on the drivers (86,650 lb) and trucks (128,250 lb overall). Retired in 1927 (427), 1928 (437), and 1930 (428, 436).


Delaware & Hudson Class W // E-2/E-2a/ E-2b (Locobase #1166)

Class W // E-2/E-2a/ E-2b Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers712-785
Builderseveral
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort30777
Grate Area85.32
Weight on Drivers147050
Locomotive Weight168050
Data from http://www.rr-fallenflags.org, amended by D & H locomotive diagram books supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

A large class of double-cab (Camelback) Consolidations built by Alco-Schenectady (712-727, 755-764, 777-780), Dickson (728-752, 781-785; works #1067-1076, 1128-1132, 1149-1154), Alco-D (765-776; works #1301-1312), and D&H (753-754).

Most remained relatively unchanged until they left service beginning in 1927; the last went to the boneyard in May 1951.

A photograph shows them to have had slide valves with inside valve gear, big Wooten firebox that was the driving reason behind the double-cab layout, closely spaced steam and sand domes, and a straight stack. Most were delivered with "water bars" supplementing the firebox heating surface;these added 104.72 sq ft to the total. These were later removed and often replaced by about 38 sq ft of arch tubes. E-2s were built with 56" drivers and were fitted with larger tires in 1905-1908.

Some diagrams show 300 tubes in the unsuperheated engines (for a total of 2,385 sq ft of evaporative heating surface), which may reflect a later reboilering.

The table shows a variety of weights among the several batches, but the other dimensions remained constant. Four were later superheated.


Delaware & Hudson Class W-1 // E-4 (Locobase #1171)

Class W-1 // E-4 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1000-1006
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 22" x 28"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter51
Tractive Effort40656
Grate Area90.19
Weight on Drivers157500
Locomotive Weight176000
Data from D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Although given a later class identification in 1915, these camelbacks (works #5088-5092, 5111, and 5868) preceded the E-3a. They had larger boilers and large Wootten grates for burning anthracite. The firebox heating surface area includes 85 sq ft of "water bars".

All were converted as single-cab B-5 0-8-0 switchers in the 1920s.


Delaware & Hudson Class V-III // G-4g (Locobase #8380)

Class V-III // G-4g Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers438-441
BuilderD & H
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 19" x 24"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort21346
Grate Area79.86
Weight on Drivers90000
Locomotive Weight134000
Data from D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This class was built at the D & H's Green Island shops. Like many of the other 4-4-0s run by this anthracite road, the V-IIIs were double-cabs (camelbacks). A somewhat unusual visual highpoint were the rounded domes before and after the cab. According to Jim Shaughnessy's tabulation (in his Delaware & Hudson, 1982 (reprint 1997), the first to retire was the 439, which was scrapped in September 1926. 441 followed in December 1928, then 438 & 440 were cut up in September 1935.


Delaware & Hudson Class E-3a (Locobase #1167)

Class E-3a Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers786-902
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 21" x 30"
Boiler Pressure190
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort37485
Grate Area90.19
Weight on Drivers168700
Locomotive Weight191700
Data from 1933 D & H locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Richard Cooper (in Shaughnessy, 1997) lays out the E-3a class of double-cab (camelback) Consolidations with the specifications as noted here. He describes this class as "the backbone of the freight service ...right up until 1940."

Most were modified to some extent and about half were converted to single-cab E-51s. See E-40, E-48 (Locobase 1169) , and E-51 entries. Four E-38s saw a small increase in the weight on drivers.


Delaware & Hudson Class E-3a -- E-48 (Locobase #1169)

Class E-3a -- E-48 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbersvarious
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 23" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort47332
Grate Area78.19
Weight on Drivers184650
Locomotive Weight209050
Data from 1933 D & H locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

28 double-cab (camelback) E-3a class given larger cylinders, superheater, Walschaert valve gear, and other upgrades. Most left service in the late 1940s.


Delaware & Hudson Class D-3 (Locobase #1160)

Class D-3 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers500-508, 557-561
Builderseveral
Year Built1903
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter72
Tractive Effort27073
Grate Area84.85
Weight on Drivers131500
Locomotive Weight175000
13-engine double-cab (camelback) class, 7 by Alco-Schenectady (500-503, 557-559), 2 by Alco-M (560-561), and 5 at D&H (504-508). Data from table in July 1904 AERJ. Firebox heating surface included 78.54 sq ft of arch tubes.

All were modified often. Ultimately, they all had 22" diameter cylinders, a weight on the drivers of 156,800 lb (except 504 & 507, which had 149,650 lb), and a total engine weight of 204,800 lb (504, 507 - 202,300 lb). Boiler pressures ranged from 200 psi (500-501, 506-507, and 558-559) to 210 (502), 215 (504-505), and 225 psi (503, 508, 557, 560-561). Tractive efforts in final form ranged from 30,150 lb to 34,000 lb.


Delaware & Hudson Class G-5 (Locobase #1182)

Class G-5 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers442-457
BuilderAlco
Year Built1903
Cylinders(2) 20" x 24"
Boiler Pressure190
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort22470
Grate Area79.91
Weight on Drivers96000
Locomotive Weight150000
The last 4-4-0s built for the D&H. These 16 engines too were double cabs (camelbacks). Seven were converted in the late 1920s to a single-cab layout; see G-5[S]. Class retired in 1930s-1940s.

http://gelwood.railfan.net/other/dh/dh-stm-bk-html locomotive diagrams supplied much of the data.


Delaware & Hudson Class D-3b (Locobase #1162)

Class D-3b Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers534-559, 590-594,599
Builderseveral
Year Built1905
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort28665
Grate Area84.91
Weight on Drivers135900
Locomotive Weight188400
Class with both double-cab (camelback) (535-557) and single-cab layouts.

The helpful folks at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/dh/dh-stm-sxx.gifl (viewed 26 December 2002 -- note that the xx means various pages) provide the Delaware & Hudson's locomotive diagrams outlining many of the variations.

According to Drury (1993), featured variations in weight on the drivers and total weight. 534, 558-559 (Alco built in 1907) put 143,000 lb on the drivers. 535-544, built by the D&H in 1905-1906, 130,000 lb; 545-557 (Alco in 1907), 134,000 lb; 590-594 (Alco, 1911), 146,000 lb; and 599 (Alco, 1911), 147,500. 599 had 23 x 26 cylinders, 170-psi boiler.

4 engines (536, 546, 549, and 556) later received 22 x 26" cylinders.

Locobase has three entries:

1) This one, which represents the original, saturated-steam product;

2) The superheated variant (Locobase 4954) , and

3) The Chateaugay-branch subclass (Locobase 4955).

Most were scrapped in the late 1930s and 1940s, with 546 the last under the torch in 1952.


Delaware & Hudson Class E-5 - 1st batch (Locobase #5376)

Class E-5 - 1st batch Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1007-1024
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1906
Cylinders(2) 23" x 30"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort49698
Grate Area99.85
Weight on Drivers217500
Locomotive Weight246500
Data from table in the June 1907 issue of AERJ.

Part of a 90-engine group of single- and double-cab Consolidations built from 1906 to 1914, this is the 1st 18-locomotive batch. These were the only double-cabs (camelbacks) in the class.

See Locobase 1172 for outline of the entire class.


Delaware & Hudson Class E-2 - superheated (Locobase #8361)

Class E-2 - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers713, 726, 740, 855
Builderseveral
Year Built1920
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort30777
Grate Area85.32
Weight on Drivers137250
Locomotive Weight158650
Data from D & H 1 - 1930 Locomotive Diagrams book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Locobase 1166 describes the as-delivered characteristics of this large camelback Consolidation class. Four were later superheated at considerable expense in heating surface area. Two (713 & 726) received piston valves, but all retained their inside Stephenson valve motion.


Delaware & Hudson Class E-3a / E-40 (Locobase #1168)

Class E-3a / E-40 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbersvarious
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1925
Cylinders(2) 21" x 30"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort41431
Grate Area90.19
Weight on Drivers200500
Locomotive Weight224500
Data from 1933 D & H locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

17 double-cab (camelback) E-3a conversions with 210-psi boilers. E-40s were two engines with 21.5 x 30" cylinders and 190-psi boilers; E-42s (3 engines) had 21.5 x 30" cylinders, 200-psi boilers, and 183,150 lb on the drivers. Began leaving service in 1939 with the last hanging on until 1951.


Delaware & Hudson Class D-3a (Locobase #5297)

Class D-3a Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers521
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1928
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort28250
Grate Area84.91
Weight on Drivers136000
Locomotive Weight186000
See http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/dh/dh-stm-s09.gif (viewed 26 Dec 2002) for diagram and full details.

One of a 4-engine double-cab (Camelback) class. Of these, 521 (builder's number 26907) was least modified when superheated, keeping her original cylinders and boiler pressure as well as the camelback cab arrangement. Her piston valves were actuated by Stephenson link and had a maximum 5 1/2" of travel

521 was scrapped in 1940. It is that configuration that is seen in this entry. The other three are coved in Locobase 1161.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class none (Locobase #3284)

Class none Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers61, 67
BuilderCooke
Year Built1898
Cylinders(2) 19" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter57.8
Tractive Effort24845
Grate Area80
Weight on Drivers122000
Locomotive Weight138500
Interesting camelback with a surprisingly light look to it. The anthracite-burner had the large Wooten firebox at the back of which was a full windscreen for the fireman. The center cab has a steam dome squeezed between it and the tall pipe stack and large headlight. Perhaps the relatively small cylinders and raked pilot (cow-catcher) reduce the ungainliness.

According to a compilation of Cooke locomotives by B.Rumary (25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND) and supplied to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004, works numbers were 2412-2413 (November 1898). No indication as to why there was a gap between the road numbers.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class 801 (Locobase #2986)

Class 801 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers801-820
Builderseveral
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 21" x 32"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter54
Tractive Effort44427
Grate Area82.4
Weight on Drivers166000
Locomotive Weight205000
Data from the 1899 Brooks catalogue.

Brooks builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #3304-3318 in September 1899. Dickson of Scranton, Pa built 5 more in 1900 (works 1092-1096, according to a list by JF Webber as forwarded by Allen Stanley).

This camelback featured a wide Wooten firebox (123" long by 97" wide) for burning fine anthracite coal. Identical to the CNJ's 829 class. Drury (1993) comments that "they were too powerful for their weight and were quite slippery."

Later modifications included reducing cylinder size and boiler pressure. The Brooks batch were all retired in 1923.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class 1001 (Locobase #3934)

Class 1001 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1001-1007
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 20" x 28"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter69.4
Tractive Effort28807
Grate Area85.58
Weight on Drivers137000
Locomotive Weight179000
Data from Railroad Gazette (22 June 1900), which notes that these camelbacks were quite similar in size to some Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 10-wheelers that burned bituminous coal. The Lackawanna engines generated steam in a wide Wootten firebox using fine anthracite.

Drury (1993) notes that these engines also were very similar to some Central of New Jersey locomotives. He adds that they were slow engines. Four were rebuilt with slide valves and all later were superheated and fitted with outside Walschaerts gear (see Locobase 5728).

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #3463-3469 in March 1900. Except for 1005, scrapped in March 1930, all of the class were scrapped in January 1931.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class F - camelbacks (Locobase #5724)

Class F - camelbacks Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Builderseveral
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort34197
Grate Area95
Weight on Drivers166000
Locomotive Weight186000
Data from set of DL&W locomotive diagrams at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/dlw-127.html (29 October 2003). This was large roster of camelback Consolidations were delivered by several batches by different builders over a span of 8 years, but all owned the same Wootten firebox, boiler, cylinders, and other dimensions.

Schenectady and Dickson produced the first 45 in 1901-1902 (855-899). JF Webber's Dickson list shows 10 -- 1229-1238 in November 1901 to February 1902 -- with road numbers 875-884.

Schenectady followed in 1902 with a quintet (301-305) and 8 more (315-322) in 1905.

Baldwin contributed 9 in 1904 (306-314) and Rogers delivered 23 in 1906-1908 (323-346.

Retirements began in 1923 and continued until 1935. None of these camelbacks were superheated.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class G (Locobase #102)

Class G Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers973-999, 933-972
Builderseveral
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure185
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort23701
Grate Area87.7
Weight on Drivers100000
Locomotive Weight151200
A "camelback" series with relatively low drivers for local passenger works built over a 10-year period. Featured in Railroad Gazette (3 May 1901) and a table in the June 1906 AERJ, this set of camelbacks had one of the lowest boiler heating surface to grate area ratios possible. Their relatively small drivers gave them a useful tractive effort, but as speeds and weights climbed on the express trains they hauled, this type was relegated to suburban service.

Schenectady supplied the first 27 in 1901-1903 (973-999). Baldwin followed with 15 in 1904 (953-972), then back to Schenectady for 12 in 1905 (944-955) and 11 in 1910-1911 (933-944).

Most of the camelbacks were scrapped before World War II; a few were rebuilt with a single cab.

Many were superheated in the 1916-1921 period and fitted with piston valves; see Locobases 5725-5727. Ten of these were rebuilt in the 20s with a conventional cab, Baker valve gear.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class E-2 (Locobase #5721)

Class E-2 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers570-587, 588, 589
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1903
Cylinders(2) 20.5" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter63
Tractive Effort29484
Grate Area87.6
Weight on Drivers144000
Locomotive Weight165000
Data from set of DL&W locomotive diagrams at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/dlw-127.html (29 October 2003)

The only camelback Moguls to enter service with the Lackawanna. 18 came from Schenectady in 1903, 2 more from Rogers in 1906.

The class retired beginning in 1926 with the last leaving the line in 1934. None of these was superheated.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class 1008 (Locobase #5360)

Class 1008 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1008-1012
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1905
Cylinders(2) 22.5" x 26"
Boiler Pressure215
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort34862
Grate Area94.8
Weight on Drivers154000
Locomotive Weight201000
Data from a table in June 1906 AERJ. Like their Brooks predecessors, these camelbacks generated steam in a wide Wootten firebox using fine anthracite. They were later superheated -- see Locobase 5729.

The quintet was retired over a long stretch of 11 years -- 1931-1942.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class 944 (Locobase #5362)

Class 944 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers944-955
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1905
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure185
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort23701
Grate Area87.54
Weight on Drivers100000
Locomotive Weight151200
Data from table in June 1906 AERJ. These camelbacks continued the acquisition of a series of 69" passenger engines with wide Wootten fireboxes. According to Drury (1993), the last 3 -- 953-955 -- had experimental superheaters and the last two were delivered with piston valves. The others retrofitted with piston valves when they were superheated in 1916-1921. Retirements began in 1929 and ended in 1937.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class G - superheated (Locobase #5725)

Class G - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Buildershops
Year Built1916
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure185
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort23701
Grate Area87.7
Weight on Drivers106400
Locomotive Weight159200
Data from set of DL&W locomotive diagrams at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/dlw-127.html (29 October 2003)

When the Lackawanna superheated its camelback 8-wheelers (see Locobase 102), most of them were rebuilt to the specifications shown. This involved substituting "economy chests" with piston valves for the slide valves originally installed. One locomotive, 944 had its boiler tubes lengthened by about 5" over the standard rebuild, which increased total evaporative surface area to 1,637 sq ft.

For some in the group, the upgrade meant continued service through World War II. These were later retrofitted with conventional cabs

Others began retiring in the late 1920s.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class G-8a (Locobase #5727)

Class G-8a Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers944
Buildershops
Year Built1916
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure185
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort23701
Grate Area87.6
Weight on Drivers106400
Locomotive Weight159200
Data from set of DL&W locomotive diagrams at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/dlw-127.html (29 October 2003)

Like the other superheated camelback 8-wheelers (see Locobase 102), the rebuild involved substituting "economy chests" with piston valves for the slide valves originally installed. This one engine had its boiler tubes lengthened by about 5", which accounts for the increased heating surface area.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class G-8b/G-9b (Locobase #5726)

Class G-8b/G-9b Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers934, 937, 940, 943
Buildershops
Year Built1916
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure185
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort23701
Grate Area87.7
Weight on Drivers107200
Locomotive Weight162400
Data from set of DL&W locomotive diagrams at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/dlw-127.html (29 October 2003)

Like the other superheated camelback 8-wheelers (see Locobase 102), the rebuild involved substituting "economy chests" with piston valves for the slide valves originally installed. For some reason, these 4 had fewer flues left after the conversion.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class H-1a/b/c - superheated (Locobase #5728)

Class H-1a/b/c - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1001-1007
Buildershops
Year Built1916
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort30423
Grate Area84
Weight on Drivers137000
Locomotive Weight179000
Data from Data from set of DL&W locomotive diagrams at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/dlw-127.html (29 October 2003).

These camelback TenWheelers (in their saturated form, they're profiled in Locobase 3934) preserved the wide firebox, but changed to piston valves and Walschaerts valve motion when they were upgraded. All had been retired by 1931.


Delaware, Lackawanna &Western Class H-2b/H-6b (Locobase #5729)

Class H-2b/H-6b Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1008-1013, 1015-16, 1024-
Buildershops
Year Built1916
Cylinders(2) 23" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort33887
Grate Area94
Weight on Drivers167500
Locomotive Weight214800
Data from set of DL&W locomotive diagrams at http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/dlw-127.html (29 October 2003). Originally delivered as saturated-steam engines (see Locobase 5360), these camelback Tenwheelers lost a hefty percentage of tubes to accommodate the superheater flues. In line with the Lackawanna's thinking on superheat, boiler pressure dropped as well. They also added some useful adhesion weight.

H-4a & H-6a upgrades addressed the 26 engines in the Rogers (1013-1023) and Schenectady batches (1024-36) originally delivered in 1906-7 and 1908, 1910. The one difference was the truly huge 103-sq ft grate in the Wootten firebox.

Most of these were later converted to conventional-cab locomotives.


Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR) Class L / H-15 (Locobase #9211)

Class L / H-15 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1-5 / 1504-1506
BuilderDickson
Year Built1884
Cylinders(2) 20" x 24"
Boiler Pressure140
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort22848
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers112350
Locomotive Weight127650
Data from Erie 1907 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 470-474.

These were lightly loaded camelbacks that generated modest power when compared to later classes.


Erie & Wyoming Valley (Erie Class D-18 (Locobase #9228)

Class D-18 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers26-27 / 103-104 / 114-115
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1887
Cylinders(2) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure140
Driver Diameter62
Tractive Effort14925
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers73050
Locomotive Weight104700
Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

The Pennsylvania Coal Company bought these two camelbacks (works #8717, 8725) from Baldwin with an obvious eye toward operating mountain-oriented local passenger service. They were rebuilt by Dickson in 1896 ( that's what this entry's specifications describe) and later taken into the Erie when that railroad bought the E & WV from Pennsylvania Coal.


Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR) Class F-8 (Locobase #6698)

Class F-8 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers204-205
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1885
Cylinders(3) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure140
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort24786
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers90000
Locomotive Weight103000
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Camelbacks from the E & WV. Note the small boiler and large firebox.


Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR) Class F-9 (Locobase #6699)

Class F-9 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers206, 208-214
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1886
Cylinders(3) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure140
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort24786
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers85300
Locomotive Weight98300
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Camelback Moguls from the E & WV. Note the small boiler and large firebox. Identical to the F-8s in virtually every respect.


Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR) Class G-000 (Locobase #390)

Class G-000 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers222 / 978
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year Built1889
Cylinders(2) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure130
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort15344
Grate Area69
Weight on Drivers78100
Locomotive Weight101900
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Lone camelback originally built for the Erie and Wyoming as engine 222. Bought by Erie System in 1906 and renumbered. It's not clear why this one locomotive would not have been counted among the G-14 class (Locobase 403). There's a minor 8-sq-ft difference in heating surface area ...


Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR) Class G-14 (Locobase #403)

Class G-14 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers201-202, 212-213, 215-223
BuilderSeveral
Year Built1889
Cylinders(2) 18" x 24"
Boiler Pressure130
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort17185
Grate Area69
Weight on Drivers82100
Locomotive Weight99100
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

12 small Ten-wheelers built by Dickson and Baldwin. First with large Wootten firebox and thus camelback locomotives. Indeed, because the boiler was so small, this design had one of the lowest heating surface/grate area ratios of all -- 15.5. These snub-nosed 4-6-0s had boilers that were short even for the double-cab arrangement. And the diagrams suggests that the firedoors sat on a level with the cab, which must have offered a more-than-usually frightening prospect to the fireboy who straddled the footplate and tender plate to heave birds-eye and bituminous culm in a relatively small Wootten firebox.

They were not retained as long as the other camelbacks, in part because of their greater age. Most were scrapped in the early 'teens.


Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR) Class F-10 (Locobase #4098)

Class F-10 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers741-743
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1894
Cylinders(2) 21" x 24"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort25253
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers116400
Locomotive Weight133750
Cited by Paul T. Warner (RLHS Bulletin #58) as the first of the second wave of 3-cylinder locomotives, this small class of camelback moguls had the wide firebox for burning anthracite coal. The cylinders measured 17" in diameter by 24" stroke.

(The E & WV, which began service as a narrow-gauge railway, joined the Erie as the Wyoming Division in 1901.) Westing, Erie Power (1970), says that the three were rebuilt with two 21" x 24" cylinders. A photo shows a very stubby engine with widespread drivers.

The data in the specifications, taken from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection, represents the rebuilds.


Erie & Wyoming Valley (ERR) Class H-14 (Locobase #9210)

Class H-14 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1500-1503
BuilderSchenectady
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 22" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter54
Tractive Effort45711
Grate Area90
Weight on Drivers180000
Locomotive Weight200000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This quartet was significantly bigger than most other camelbacks of the time and loomed over the typical Erie engines. All four axles sported the same high axle loading: 22 1/2 short tons and the boilers contained heating surfaces measuring 1,000 sq ft more than the average. 462 boiler tubes was a tight bundle even in a 78" diameter barrel. But the grate was commensurately enormous, offering 90 sq ft to the birds-eye anthracite and bituminous culm that provided the unusual layout's raison d'etre.

Like all of the others, however, the engines were retired in 1927.


Erie (ERR) Class D-5 (Locobase #363)

Class D-5 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers385-386
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1896
Cylinders(2) 17.5" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort15159
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers75000
Locomotive Weight111000
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Much larger 4-4-0 and one of the last for the Erie. The wide grate indicated the camelback layout, which has the steam dome behind the cab. These two engines started out as New York & Lake Erie engines 66-67, built by Danforth, Cooke and delivered in 1880. Baldwin rebuilt them for the Erie. 386 was scrapped first in March 1913 with 385 following in December 1920.


Erie (ERR) Class D-14 (Locobase #9224)

Class D-14 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers469
BuilderCooke
Year Built1897
Cylinders(2) 17.5" x 24"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort16538
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers82600
Locomotive Weight129500
Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This locomotive was converted by Cooke to a cross-compound layout, according to Westing, but the cylinder dimensions are not given, or what we see in the diagram is the HP cylinder only. In any case, it was a "one-off".


Erie (ERR) Class D-15 (Locobase #9225)

Class D-15 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers329-330
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1897
Cylinders(2) 17.5" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort15159
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers86000
Locomotive Weight128200
Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Two D-9s were converted by Baldwin as Vauclain compounds; their HP cylinders measured 12 1/2" diameter, the LPs only 21". The compounding ratio thus was a hefty 2.85. It can't have been too long before the engines were simplified as shown in the specfications.


Erie (ERR) Class D-6 (Locobase #6695)

Class D-6 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers331, 34-37, 43-56, 58-61,
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1897
Cylinders(2) 12.5" x 22"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 21" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort11422
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers78000
Locomotive Weight121000
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This was a large class of camelback Eight-wheelers. The tiny HP cylinders limited the whole Vauclain compound system's ability to handle the steam. Most were converted to simple expansion in several variants. One such conversion resulted in dimensions identical to those of the D-5 (see Locobase 363). Others were more substantially altered; see Locobase 6696 and 6697.


Erie (ERR) Class D-6/D-7 - simple, D flue (Locobase #6697)

Class D-6/D-7 - simple, D flue Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Buildershops
Year Built1897
Cylinders(2) 17.5" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort15159
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers84300
Locomotive Weight125700
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Converting the D-6 class of camelback Eight-wheelers led to three different versions. This one is identified on the diagram as having a D flue sheet (as opposed to the straight flue sheet shown in Locobase 6697). The diagrams raise many questions. How can this version, which has a few fewer tubes than the straight flue version, but of larger diameter, have had so much less heating surface?


Erie (ERR) Class D-6/D-7 - simple, strt flue (Locobase #6696)

Class D-6/D-7 - simple, strt flue Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Buildershops
Year Built1897
Cylinders(2) 17.5" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort15159
Grate Area67.8
Weight on Drivers84300
Locomotive Weight125700
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This was a large class of camelback Eight-wheelers. When the D-6 Vauclain compounds were simpled, three different versions resulted. This one is identified on the diagram as having a straight flue sheet (as opposed to the D flue sheet shown in Locobase 6697). Locobase does not know why a "straight flue sheet" would result in so many fewer tubes and so small a firebox, even though the overall heating surface area rose.


Erie (ERR) Class D-7 (Locobase #9218)

Class D-7 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1897
Cylinders(2) 12.5" x 22"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 21" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter72
Tractive Effort10787
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers87330
Locomotive Weight125300
Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers 15231-15240, 15279-15282, 15295-15300, 15311-15315, 15420-15428, 15441-15446, 15451-15455.

The Erie threw itself into compounding and extended its reach to these small Americans. Note the small size of both the HP cylinders and the boiler tubes; see Locobase 6697 for another version.

Like the D-6s, these were soon simplified; see Locobase 9219.


Erie (ERR) Class D-7 - simple, combustion chbr (Locobase #9219)

Class D-7 - simple, combustion chbr Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Buildershops
Year Built1897
Cylinders(2) 17.5" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort15159
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers86500
Locomotive Weight125900
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

As noted in Locobase 6695 and 6697, simplifying the Vauclain compounds that had been created out of earlier locomotives took several forms. The D-7 compound that was the source of the current entry (see Locobase 9218) originally had 2" tubes. A variant not reflected in the D-6 series was one in which a combustion chamber added some heating surface to the firebox, but reduced tube length and consequently required more of the tiny 1 1/2" tubes.


Erie (ERR) Class E-1 (Locobase #426)

Class E-1 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers502-527, 532-534
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 18" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter76
Tractive Effort18843
Grate Area64
Weight on Drivers75800
Locomotive Weight155100
Data from Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Twenty-nine Camelback Vauclain compounds delivered with two 13" HP and two 22" LP cylinders. They were shortly (1904-1906) converted to single-expansion engines.

Retired in 1927-1928.


Erie (ERR) Class H-3 - rebuilt I (Locobase #9206)

Class H-3 - rebuilt I Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1006,
BuilderErie
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 19" x 24"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort26512
Grate Area78
Weight on Drivers125400
Locomotive Weight139000
Data from Erie 1907 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Erie rebuilt older I-class, conventional-layout engines (Locobase 4047) as camelbacks (16445-16449) in January 1899. As with some other Erie camelbacks, a striking feature of this class was the difference in axle loadings among the various axles. In the H-3s, the lightest loading, on the 3rd coupled axle, was 7 tons less than the heaviest, which was the axle next ahead. That one, the 2nd coupled axle had the crank, main rod, and cab all bearing down on it.


Erie (ERR) Class H-4 - rebuilt I (Locobase #9229)

Class H-4 - rebuilt I Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1001
BuilderErie
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 19" x 24"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort26512
Grate Area78
Weight on Drivers131300
Locomotive Weight145600
Data from Erie 1907 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Erie rebuilt older I-class, conventional-layout engines (Locobase 4047) as camelbacks in January 1899. Unlike the H-3s that rebuilt at the same time, the H-4s had a relatively constant axle loading among the drivers that probably reflected the use of new frames. Otherwise, the two classes were essentially identical.


Erie (ERR) Class H-10 (Locobase #9208)

Class H-10 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1450-1469
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort37485
Grate Area75
Weight on Drivers166900
Locomotive Weight187000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This class of camelbacks came from nearby Paterson, New Jersey's Rogers works. They had some of the usual uneven weight distribution that was characteristic of locomotives whose drivers sat in howdahs perched over the center two drivers. Oddly, the heaviest axle loading fell on the first couple axle, which supported none of the usual heavy components. The lightest axle loading came on the second coupled axle.

The steam dome was somewhat unusually placed in line with the cab. Indeed, if one takes away the centered cab, the proportions of the engine suggest a relatively straightforward 2-8-0 design.


Erie (ERR) Class H-11 (Locobase #5701)

Class H-11 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1470-1499
BuilderRogers
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort37485
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers170000
Locomotive Weight190000
Data from 1917 Erie locomotive diagram from http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/erie-e11d.gif (visited 31 October 2003).

This class of camelback Consolidations had relatively short lifetimes, with most being scrapped in the late 1920s after several years of inactivity. Curiously, unlike many Erie camelbacks, weight was distributed evenly across the 4 axles.


Erie (ERR) Class H-12 (Locobase #4117)

Class H-12 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1425-1449
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter62
Tractive Effort33857
Grate Area75
Weight on Drivers165900
Locomotive Weight189400
Camelback consolidations were a common sight on the Erie. This batch, described in the Railroad Gazette of 14 June 1901, were right in line with the entire series. RG noted that the center of the boiler is pitched 11' 10" above the rail, "the greatest height ... that has yet been used." The Wootten firebox burned a combination of bird's-eye anthracite and bituminous culm and would work the Allegheny, Jefferson, and Bradford divisions.

At the time of its article, the RG assumeed that that the Baldwins would differ only in "those light modifications which are necessary to adapt some Baldwin patterns" to the Brooks practice. That turned out to be mightily incorrect; see Locobase 9209.

They were retired in 1927.


Erie (ERR) Class G-12 (Locobase #401)

Class G-12 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers909-918
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter62
Tractive Effort31439
Grate Area77
Weight on Drivers148700
Locomotive Weight179100
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Considerably larger than earlier Erie ten-wheelers, these Cameback Ten-wheelers had greater tractive power. At the same time as these were delivered, Baldwin supplied Vauclain compounds to the same design; see Locobase 402.

The G-12s remained in service until 1927.


Erie (ERR) Class G-13 (Locobase #402)

Class G-13 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 15.5" x 28"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 26" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter62
Tractive Effort27217
Grate Area77
Weight on Drivers153200
Locomotive Weight191200
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection,.

15 camelback engines built as Vauclain compounds in the same year as the G-12 simples (Locobase 401); they had identical boiler and grate dimensions. Later rebuilt as simple-expansion engines.


Erie (ERR) Class G-16 (Locobase #405)

Class G-16 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers919-933
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort25623
Grate Area77
Weight on Drivers141950
Locomotive Weight180100
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

These camelbacks were delivered as G-13s (Locobase 402), but later rebuilt to these dimensions.


Erie (ERR) Class H-13 (Locobase #9209)

Class H-13 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1410-1424
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 21" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter62
Tractive Effort36276
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers179000
Locomotive Weight199000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers ran 19067-19068, 19092-19093, 19115-19116, 19138-19139, 19165-19168, 19199-19201.

The Railroad Gazette of 14 June 1901 reported that the Baldwins will differ from the Brooks engines (class H-12 - Locobase 4117) only in "those slight modifications which are necessary to adapt some Baldwin patterns" to the Brooks practice. Were they ever off. This class, though numbered in a lower range, succeeded the H-12s and were quite a bit bigger.

Like all of the Erie's camelbacks, the H-13s had a Wootten firebox, which burned a combination of bird's-eye anthracite and bituminous culm and would work the Allegheny, Jefferson, and Bradford divisions. They were retired in 1927.


Erie (ERR) Class H-16 (Locobase #9212)

Class H-16 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1510-1529
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 17" x 30"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 28" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort38462
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers169000
Locomotive Weight191000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers ran 20090-20091, 20095-20099, 20141-20143, 20202-20205, 20222-20225, 20278-20279.

These were big Vauclain compounds, but they didn't remain compounds for long. By 1907, they had been rebuilt as simple-expansion engines; see Locobase 9213.


Erie (ERR) Class H-17 (Locobase #9214)

Class H-17 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1530-44
BuilderRogers
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 22" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort44079
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers180000
Locomotive Weight200000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

These Paterson, New Jersey Consolidations were about as big as the 78-sq ft grated double-cab would get. Tube counts exceeding 400 represented about as many as could be maintained (although the Cooke engines shown in Locobase 9215 would actualy put more tubes in a tighter boiler). The design had an even axle loading across the 4 couple axles, weighing in at 22 1/2 short tons each.


Erie (ERR) Class H-18 (Locobase #9215)

Class H-18 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1545-1564
BuilderAlco-Cooke
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 22" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort44079
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers180000
Locomotive Weight200000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Like the Rogers H-17s (Locobase 9214) of the same year and the same home town (Paterson, NJ), these camelback Consolidations bulked about as large as a 76-sq ft grate would permit. Somehow Cooke fit 10 more tubes in a tighter boiler than had Rogers.


Erie (ERR) Class H-19 (Locobase #9216)

Class H-19 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1565-1569
BuilderAlco-Cooke
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 16" x 30"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 30" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort36303
Grate Area76.5
Weight on Drivers185600
Locomotive Weight209000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Part of Cooke's 1902 production of camelback Consolidations for the Erie was this quintet of 4-cylinder compounds, which put almost 3 additional tons of adhesive weight on the 4 coupled axles . Before too long, they were converted to simple-expansion engines.


Erie (ERR) Class H-16 - simpled (Locobase #9213)

Class H-16 - simpled Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1510-1529
BuilderErie
Year Built1907
Cylinders(2) 21" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort40163
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers169000
Locomotive Weight191000
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Introduced in 1902 as Vauclain compounds (Locobase 9212), this class was soon rebuilt with two single-expansion cylinders. This didn't faze Samuel Vauclain - he had already determined that superheating was a better source of economy than even his version of the double-expansion concept.

Like the other camelbacks, these were retired in 1927.


Erie (ERR) Class L1 (AERJ 1908) (Locobase #5700)

Class L1 (AERJ 1908) Specifications
Wheel Arrangement0-8-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers2600-2602
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1907
Cylinders(2) 25" x 28"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 39" x 28"
Boiler Pressure215
Driver Diameter51
Tractive Effort88890
Grate Area100
Weight on Drivers410000
Locomotive Weight410000
Data from table in 1908 AERJ, which deepens a Locobase mystery. These three Anguses were the only camelbacks with this arrangement. The author drafted two other entries (2799, 5355 -- since deleted) with different data -- in one case a boiler with tubes some 3 feet longer and another much more heating surface. Not able to determine for sure which was the valid data, he decided to show all three until the questions could be answered.

Could the 24' tubes have been the original length but soon seen as overwhelming both the fireman and his grate without any commensurate gain in heating value? The tube count certainly suggests as much. The two earlier accounts showed 446 tubes and a total of 6,629 sq ft of heating surface. A later 1907 AERJ raised the tube count to 468, but shortened the length to 21 ft (total ehs 6,108 sq ft). In the June 1908 account of the testing, we see still fewer tubes and a lower overall heating surface area.

Known at one time as the Angus, they were the only camelback Mallets of this wheel arrangement. Drury (1993) comments that "On the job they proved mostly that it took a skilled and strong fireman to produce the power they were designed to deliver."

In 1921, they were rebuilt by Baldwin as 2-8-8-2s and fitted with mechanical stokers. The cab was moved back to a conventional location behind the firebox. The lead truck extended wayyyyy forward of the smokebox -- Locobase wonders about the weight distribution of this design. In this form they operated until 1930.

In 2004, MTH modelers unveiled its model of the 0-8-8-0 and explained the nickname as follows:

"The L1 obtained the nickname "Angus-type" as a result of noted railroad operations writer Angus Sinclair's comments that the L1 would dry up all the country's canals and make all forms of water transportation obsolete thanks to the engine's incredible thirst. Because only three L1 locomotives were constructed, Sinclair's comments never rang true but the engine did establish the use of Mallet type engines beyond narrow gauge light duty use."

(see http://www.mth-railking.com/newsdetail.asp?artid=128, visited 11 Nov 2004).


Erie (ERR) Class H-19 - simpled (Locobase #5702)

Class H-19 - simpled Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1565-1569
BuilderAlco-Cooke
Year Built1908
Cylinders(2) 22" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort44079
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers172170
Locomotive Weight192280
Data from 1923 Erie locomotive diagram from http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/erie-e19d.gif (visited 31 October 2003).

The last of a slew of Camelback Consolidations with large Wootten fireboxes. Like the earlier engines, the H-19s' lifetimes were relatively short, with most being scrapped in the late 1920s after several years of inactivity. This may have been due to the difficulty of complying with later regulations or the lack of good service for saturated-steam engines of this type.


Hecla & Torch Lake Class 6 (Locobase #8533)

Class 6 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
Gauge4' 1""
Road Numbers6-7
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year Built1885
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort28288
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers116000
Locomotive Weight130000
Data from Reports of the United States Commissioners to the Universal Exposition at Paris in 1889 to the House of Representatives, 51st Congress, 1st Session, Ex. Doc 450 Part 3 (Washington, Government Printing Office, 1891), p. 494-495, which identified the engines as belonging to the "Calumet & Hecla Mining Company".

These Consolidations worked on a narrow-gauge mining line in Michigan, but had the big Wootten firebox for burning buckwheat or pea anthracite coal. The center two drivers on each side were flangeless.

According to Connelly's Baldwin list, this pair was produced by Baldwin in consecutive Octobers, works #7709 in 1885 as Kichigami, #8199 in 1886 as Manitou. They were later rebuilt as conventional-cab locomotives with Belpaire fireboxes, according to one of the several Copper Range websites -- http://www.pasty.com/copperrange/chroster.htm, last accessed 22 July 2007. They were scrapped in 1944 & 1945, respectively.


Lehigh & New England Class E-8 (Locobase #7049)

Class E-8 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers25, 27
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1906
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort35360
Grate Area84
Weight on Drivers138480
Locomotive Weight154800
Data from L&NE 8 - 1940 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Low drivers, camelback layout, big Wootten firebox -- all the elements of a typical helper on this Anthracite region bridge line.


Lehigh & New England Class E-9 (Locobase #7050)

Class E-9 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers29
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1909
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort35360
Grate Area84
Weight on Drivers145940
Locomotive Weight162900
Data from L&NE 8 - 1940 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Very similar camelback to the two that landed on the L & NE three years earlier (Locobase 7049). A few minor changes included adding 3" to the tube length. When the engine was superheated, the area was just a bit less than the 25 & 27.


Lehigh & New England Class E-12 (Locobase #2788)

Class E-12 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers151-152
BuilderBaldwin
Year Built1911
Cylinders(2) 23.5" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort49412
Grate Area95
Weight on Drivers204650
Locomotive Weight224850
Data from L&NE 8 - 1940 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Classic "Mother Hubbard" (or camelback) layout with the engineer's cab straddling the boiler ahead of the wide Wootten anthracite-burning firebox. Like the E-13s (Locobase 6701), this pair had drivers tall enough for them to be used as road engines.


Lehigh & New England Class E-13 (Locobase #6701)

Class E-13 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers153-154
BuilderBaldwin
Year Built1915
Cylinders(2) 25" x 30"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter57
Tractive Effort50329
Grate Area95
Weight on Drivers208000
Locomotive Weight233000
Data from L&NE 8 - 1940 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This was the last class of "Mother Hubbard" (or camelback) Consolidations supplied to the L & NE. Little had changed in the basic design -- the grate area remained huge, the cab sat over the 2nd driving axle and between the two domes.


Lehigh Coal & Navigation Class 33 / E-10 (Locobase #7051)

Class 33 / E-10 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers33-34 / 58
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1908
Cylinders(2) 23" x 28"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort40469
Grate Area94.5
Weight on Drivers170000
Locomotive Weight190000
Data from L&NE 8 - 1940 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Camelbacks that formed part of the LC & N's stud when it was produced in June 1908 (works #32838-32839). They then worked for the Panther Creek Railroad until sold in December 1913

When it appeared in the 1940 edition, the surviving engine had been sent to the Lehigh & New England (then controlled by the LC & N) and superheated.


Lehigh Valley Class (Locobase #5705)

Class Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Buildershops
Year Built1890
Cylinders(2) 19.02" x 25.98"
Boiler Pressure179.8
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort21123
Grate Area63.59
Weight on Drivers77616
Locomotive Weight108639
Taken from one of those frustratingly nearly specific articles that would at times appear in the American Engineer & Railroad Journal. This November 1893 installment describes a camelback 8-wheeler designed for the LV by its Master Mechanic John I Kinsey "some time since". So the construction date is an estimate.

Alas, so is the boiler pressure since that figure is not present anywhere in the account. The article notes that the Reading used this engine on its Royal Blue Express trains between Philadelphia and Atlantic City "with remarkably good results", says the unidentified correspondent. No hot journals were reported, he notes, and the boiler supplied plenty of steam on a schedule that called for speeds between 55 & 75 mph between stops.


Lehigh Valley Class (Locobase #8880)

Class Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Buildershops
Year Built1896
Cylinders(2) 20" x 24"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort19200
Grate Area75.3
Weight on Drivers89300
Locomotive Weight127400
Data from Trait pratique de la machine locomotive ... By Maurice Demoulin, 1898

Librairie polytechnique, Baudry et Cie, p 384

The Trait pratique notes that the design had an extended smokebox, which was seldom used in combination with a Wootten firebox. Locobase estimates the entry date, noting that in any case this was an 1890s camelback.


Lehigh Valley Class M-30 (Locobase #5338)

Class M-30 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers680-684
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1896
Cylinders(2) 18" x 30"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 28" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter55
Tractive Effort42517
Grate Area90
Weight on Drivers202232
Locomotive Weight225082
Data from table in AERJ July 1903. This was a huge Camelback Consolidation. Very few boilers tried to cram more than 500 firetubes in their cross-section, and mustering over 4,000 sq ft of evaporative heating surface was also unusual in a 2-8-0.

The tables in July 1903 and June 1906 are confusing because they show slightly different boilers, but refer to the same original article -- December 1898, p. 395 -- to which Locobase will have to turn to resolve this ambiguity.


Lehigh Valley Class M-37 (Locobase #5375)

Class M-37 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1301-1315
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1898
Cylinders(2) 18" x 30"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 28" x 30"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter55.5
Tractive Effort42134
Grate Area90
Weight on Drivers205232
Locomotive Weight228082
Data from table in AERJ June 1906. This was a huge Camelback Consolidation, very similar to the M-35s (Locobase 7304), but with lower drivers.


Lehigh Valley Class J-54/A (Locobase #3935)

Class J-54/A Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1550-1556
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 17" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 28" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter72
Tractive Effort25926
Grate Area71.25
Weight on Drivers141348
Locomotive Weight194758
Shown in Railroad Gazette's last issue of the year in 1900 (Vol XXXII, No. 52), with weights raised by table in AERJ July 1903. (The RG article had lower weights, which may well have been estimates.)

This camelback was designed by Mechanical Engineer F F Gaines. Its charge was to haul 400 tons of passenger train over the division between Easton and Wilkes-Barre over a ruling grade of 1.15%. It combined the wide Wootten firebox for anthracite coal with the Vauclain 4-cylinder compounding layout.

Retirements began in 1923 and were complete by 1929.


Lehigh Valley Class F-2 (Locobase #8950)

Class F-2 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers2400-2406
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1903
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter77
Tractive Effort22961
Grate Area76.9
Weight on Drivers107250
Locomotive Weight184650
Data from Clarence Roberts & Russell M Smith, Practical Locomotive Operating (Philadelphia: J B Lippincott Co, 1912), pp 61,67

The authors of the book intended this engine to be a typical Atlantic express passenger engine. They did pretty well in finding a standard camelback 4-4-2, although the tubes on this class were a bit longer than most.


Lehigh Valley Class J-55 1/2 (Locobase #7301)

Class J-55 1/2 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1590-1694
Builderseveral
Year Built1904
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure205
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort31183
Grate Area85.08
Weight on Drivers154000
Locomotive Weight203000
Data from LV 3 - 1934 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

This large class of camelback Ten-wheelers came from Baldwin and Alco and formed the underpinning for local passenger engines on the Lehigh Valley. The entire class of 105 locomotives was delivered with 23"-diameter cylinders, but the boiler proved too small to support that volume so 65 of them were rebuilt with 21" cylinders. Many were superheated in the 1920s; see Locobase 7302.


Lehigh Valley Class M-35 (Locobase #7304)

Class M-35 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers700-769, 780-812
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1914
Cylinders(2) 21" x 30"
Boiler Pressure205
Driver Diameter62.5
Tractive Effort36885
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers183810
Locomotive Weight211420
Data from LV 3 -1934 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

102 camelback Consolidations comprised this large class that was originally delivered as Vauclain compounds in 1899 to 1902. Only three years later they were converted to simple expansion and, beginning in 1914, fitted with superheaters and piston valves.

As one might guess of one of the most numerous classes on the LV, retirements covered a long period. The first went in 1916 (possibly an accident victim?) and the last held out until 1951.


Lehigh Valley Class M-36 (Locobase #7305)

Class M-36 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers813-832
BuilderAlco-Schenectady
Year Built1916
Cylinders(2) 23" x 30"
Boiler Pressure205
Driver Diameter62.5
Tractive Effort44246
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers187900
Locomotive Weight214900
Data from LV 3 -1934 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Five years after Baldwin delivered its big batch of camelback Consolidations (Locobase 7304), Alco followed with 20 more simple-expansion engines in 1907 with the same-size grate but a bigger boiler. Beginning in 1916, some were fitted with superheaters and piston valves.

Retirements of this class began in 1928 and were completed 17 years later in 1945.


Lehigh Valley Class J-55 1/2 - superheated (Locobase #7302)

Class J-55 1/2 - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Buildershops
Year Built1923
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure205
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort31183
Grate Area85.08
Weight on Drivers154964
Locomotive Weight207234
Data from LV 3 - 1934 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

The large class of camelback Ten-wheelers described in Locobase 7301 came in for a superheater upgrade in the 1920s. 172 of the 2" tubes were removed to allow for 24 superheater flues.


Long Island Class 151 (Locobase #2619)

Class 151 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers151-153
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1898
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter51
Tractive Effort37044
Grate Area69.5
Weight on Drivers135000
Locomotive Weight155000
Data from 1899 Brooks Catalogue.

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #3101-03, manufactured in December 1898.

If ever a locomotive design got hit in the face with an ugly stick, this Mother Hubbard Consoldation qualifies as a showpiece of unaesthetic ironmongery. Using a wide firebox to burn anthracite coal meant exiling the fireman to the rear deck under his own overhang. The engineer rode in a cab that bestrode the barrel over the drivers and ahead of the steam dome. With the fat barrel and small drivers to further disrupt any sense of proportion and grace, this camelback engine must have been very serviceable because it couldn't depend on its looks.


Long Island Class (Locobase #2969)

Class Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers123-127
BuilderBrooks
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter60.5
Tractive Effort28997
Grate Area69.5
Weight on Drivers115000
Locomotive Weight151000
Data from 1899 Brooks catalogue.

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works #3229-3233 in June 1899

Camelback freight engine with the wide firebox (10 x 8 feet) burning fine anthracite coal. The catalogue gives the engine's rigid wheelbase as 6 feet, which implies lateral driving-axle boxes at least on the lead axle and flangeless drivers.


Long Island Class (Locobase #4118)

Class Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1-2
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 19.5" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter76
Tractive Effort22115
Grate Area75.5
Weight on Drivers97850
Locomotive Weight166110
Railroad Gazette (5 July 1901) has a brief description of these camelback Atlantics, which ran the length of the line from Long Island City clear out to Montauk.


Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT) Class G3 (Locobase #7737)

Class G3 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers251
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1895
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort31327
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers136500
Locomotive Weight148600
Data from MKT 1903 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

The camelback locomotive layout operated almost exclusively in the anthracite regions of Pennsylvania that had seen its invention by John Wootten in the 1870s. Once in a great while, though, other railroads would sample the big firebox. According to Drury (1993), the Katy's adoption of the few they acquired was motivated by a wish to burn the low-grade coal they were extracting from mines near McAlester, Oklahoma.

The first such engine for the Katy was this Baldwin product, which was unusually lavish in its accommodations for the fireman in the rear -- overhead canopy even had windows. The engineer's cab, which straddled the boiler over the 2nd and 3rd drivers, had a clerestory and 3 panes a side. As with the other camelbacks, this one would be rebuilt as a conventional-cab engine.


Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT) Class G4 / K-6-b (Locobase #7739)

Class G4 / K-6-b Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers432, 437
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort34808
Grate Area76.1
Weight on Drivers151915
Locomotive Weight166815
Data from MKT 1903 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

As noted in Locobase 7738, the camelback was rare outside of Pennsylvania. But the Katy had some low-calorie coal coming out of its McAlester mines and wanted to burn it in the wide Wootten fireboxes. A few years after the single G3, the railroad bought 2 more G4s. These were a bit bigger and had longer boilers. Like the G3, they were converted to conventional cab engines.


Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT) Class G5 (Locobase #7740)

Class G5 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers494
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 22" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter56
Tractive Effort41140
Grate Area76.2
Weight on Drivers156500
Locomotive Weight180000
Data from MKT 1903 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Continuing its acquisition of a few camelbacks (see Locobases 7738 & 7739), the Katy acquired this substantially larger example a year after the second of the two G4s was delivered. Little increased in grate, the firebox actually had a little less heating surface overall. The tubes were longer and there were more of them, hence the generous evaporative heating surface area.

The last of its kind, this camelback was converted to a conventional cab as were the others.


New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR) Class L / H-5 (Locobase #9204)

Class L / H-5 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers10-17 / 1300-1307
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year Built1886
Cylinders(2) 20" x 24"
Boiler Pressure140
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort22848
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers122900
Locomotive Weight136000
Data from Erie 1907 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 8224, 8227-8229, 8244-8245, 8272-8273.

As noted in other classes of Erie's camelback Consolidation conglomeration, many had uneven axle loadings. In this case, the leading coupled axle was measured at 23,900 lb load while the third coupled axle, which took the main rod, and turned under the cab, bore almost 6 1/2 tons more. Locobase wonders if these locomotives had any unusual wear issues.


New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR) Class N / F-3 (Locobase #372)

Class N / F-3 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers745-746
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year Built1886
Cylinders(2) 20" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter62
Tractive Effort25665
Grate Area77
Weight on Drivers125330
Locomotive Weight142840
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

F-3s had the largest boilers in an Erie Mogul type, a fitting achievement for these sizable Camelbacks. Unlike most of the other engines, however, these had small and short 1 1/2" tubes and needed 431of them to supply enough heating surface for the sizable grate.


New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR) Class L / H-7 (Locobase #9205)

Class L / H-7 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1360-84
BuilderRogers
Year Built1888
Cylinders(2) 20" x 24"
Boiler Pressure140
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort22848
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers110700
Locomotive Weight130200
Data from Erie 1907 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Locobase was struck by the uneven weight distribution across the 4 axles of this class of camelback Consolidations. The rearmost coupled axle bore 18,900 lb with weight steadily increasing as the axle count decreased until the first coupled axle, which was located under the dome, supported almost 9 tons more.


New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR) Class L / H-6 (Locobase #6018)

Class L / H-6 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers733-747 / 1318-1332
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year Built1890
Cylinders(2) 20" x 24"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort26112
Grate Area78
Weight on Drivers115800
Locomotive Weight130200
Data from Westing's Erie Power (1970) and tables in December 1894 American Engineer and Railroad Journal (AERJ). Works numbers were 10893-10897, 10904-10906, 10913, 10921.

Heavy road freight camelback with the usual weird appearance. Axle loadings, which often varied considerably among camelback layouts, were somewhat more balanced in this class. The two center coupled axles, turning under the cab and taking the thrust of the main rod, had loads of 32,800 and 30,700 lb (2nd and 3rd axles, respectively). The outer two had mid-20s loadings (26,700 lb on the lead, 25,600 lb on the trailing axle0.

Later renumbered 1314 and converted for switching with a conventional cab that uncomfortably straddled the Wootten firebox.


New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR) Class G-8/G-9 (Locobase #398)

Class G-8/G-9 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Builderseveral
Year Built1891
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure175
Driver Diameter62
Tractive Effort27509
Grate Area77
Weight on Drivers118500
Locomotive Weight144500
Data from Erie's 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

50 engines built by Susquehanna shops and Baldwin in 1891 and 1896. Note very large grate in this camelback design, used for burning low-calorie coal. Most were simple-expansion, some (possibly only 975) were built as compounds with 14-in high-pressure, 24-in low-pressure cylinder diameters. Compounds worked at 180 psi.


New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR) Class S / J-1 (Locobase #3271)

Class S / J-1 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-10-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers800-805
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1891
Cylinders(2) 16" x 28"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 27" x 28"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort32467
Grate Area89.5
Weight on Drivers172000
Locomotive Weight195000
Data from http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/erie-j1d.gif, a locomotive diagram dated 4-20-1917 (last accessed 4 July 2007), a History of the Baldwin Locomotive Works from 1831 to 1897 (J. B. Lippincott company, 1897), p 81, and Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

The earliest source, the Baldwin history, gives the tube length and firebox heating surface as shown (12 ft, 185 sq ft) and notes a combustion chamber. They were later converted to simple-expansion operation with two 21 x 28" cylinders, boiler pressure reduced to 165 psi, and a tractive effort of 34,640 lb. The 1907 diagram add the data that the combustion chamber contributed 57 sq ft to the firebox heating surface. The 1917 diagram suggests that the chamber was later removed; see Locobase 8530 for the data on this later modification.

These engines were among the first decapods -- almost certainly the only Camelbacks of the wheel arrangement -- and relatively small compared to later 2-10-0s. The Baldwin history notes that the first, fourth, and fifth driver sets were flanged and that the last had 1/4" lateral play. The history described the role played by this quintet: "These locomotives are used as pushers on the Susquehanna Hill,where curves of five degrees are combined with grades of 60 ft per mile [1.5%], doing the work of two ordinary 'Consolidation' locomotives."


New York, Lake Erie & Western (ERR) Class J-1 - simpled (Locobase #8530)

Class J-1 - simpled Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-10-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers800-805
BuilderErie
Year Built1907
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure165
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort34636
Grate Area89.5
Weight on Drivers173700
Locomotive Weight200550
Data from http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/loco/erie-j1d.gif, a locomotive diagram dated 4-20-1917 (last accessed 4 July 2007) and the Erie 1907 locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

As noted in Locobase 3271, these camelback Decapods were delivered as compound locomotives. Some time around the turn of the century, the class was simpled. It retained its 36" combustion chamber (contributing 57 sq ft to firebox heating surface) for some time after that and that configuration is shown in the specifications.

By the time of the 1917 diagram, however, the combustion chamber had been eliminated and the specs show 15 ft 0 3/8" tubes. Yet a comparison with the earlier version unearths an anomaly. With the deletion of the combustion chamber, the Erie diagram shows that tube evaporative heating surface came to 2,228 sq ft, only 16 sq ft more than the same number of tubes measuring a full 3 ft less in 1907. A straight upscale based on the longer tubes suggests instead a total tube area of 2,785 sq ft.


New York, Ontario & Western Class S (Locobase #3150)

Class S Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers191-192
BuilderDickson
Year Built1893
Cylinders(2) 20" x 24"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort26112
Grate Area80
Weight on Drivers111000
Locomotive Weight135000
Data from McShane (1899), supplemented by D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

A typical anthracite-road camelback freight engine pair of the turn of the century; although this design - Dickson works #911-912 -- is relatively small. They were delivered as compounds, but didn't stay with the NY, O & W for long.

The D & H diagram book reveals that these engines were sold to the D & H in 1896 and renumbered 93-94 (and later 700-701) as their class E. They were disposed of by 1927.


New York, Ontario, & Western Class 1 (Locobase #8991)

Class 1 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1-3
BuilderCooke
Year Built1895
Cylinders(2) 17" x 24"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort15606
Grate Area63
Weight on Drivers76000
Locomotive Weight110000
Data from Charles McShane, One Thousand Pointers for Machinists & Engineers (By Charles McShane (Chicago: Griffin & Winters, 1897), pp 266, 268.

McShane explains that this locomotive (Cooke works #2325) was produced "...in order to demonstrate whether an engine of these dimensions and weight would give better results than a compound engine, also whether an engine of this weight in passenger service with cylinders 17x24" and a constant boiler pressure of 180 pounds would not be better than one with 18x24" cylinders, and lagging for steam on heavy grades. It was intended, also, to demonstrate whether such an engine could not be run at a much reduced cost of fuel."

As is often the case with writeups like this, the locomotive proved to be peerless and is described as having met "... the highest expectations of its designer,Mr. George

W. West, Supt. M. P. of the New York, Ontario & Western railway. It has shown a surprisingly good fuel record, as it is run opposite one of their best anthracite coal burners with 18x24" cylinders, and during a test of 14 days when every pound of coal used by both engines was weighed; this engine hauled the same train 2,020 miles at a cost of 3 3/4 cents per engine mile, while the other engine's fuel cost 6 1/4 cents per engine mile: this is considered as near perfect as an engine can be built for burning cheap fuel."

Noting that it is an 8-wheel camelback, McShane adds details: The boiler is supplied by two No. 8 Monttor injectors. The Smith triple expansion exhaust pipe is used, also the Leach track sanding apparatus, and Nathan triple slight feed lubricator."


New York, Ontario, & Western Class P (Locobase #3944)

Class P Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers201-220
BuilderCooke
Year Built1900
Cylinders(2) 21" x 32"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter55
Tractive Effort43619
Grate Area87.4
Weight on Drivers170200
Locomotive Weight198130
Typical anthracite-burning camelback delivered to the NYO&W at the turn of the 20th century as described in . Railroad Gazette (23 March 1900). This locomotive was intended for pusher service on coal trains, according to George W. West, Superintendent of Motive Power, who designed it.

Cooke delivered the class over 4 years, the last three arriving in March 1904. All of them remained in service until the late 1940s.

See William D. Edson's roster in Railroad History Bulletin 175 for builder's numbers. Note that the first 14 had Cooke serials (2509, 2566-2568, 2646-2651, 2710-2713) and the last 6 were blended into the total Alco count (26242-26244, 29286-29288).


New York, Ontario, & Western Class U (Locobase #4120)

Class U Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Builderseveral
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 19.5" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort26232
Grate Area80
Weight on Drivers134000
Locomotive Weight151000
This anthracite-burning camelback Mogul was a conversion by Mr. George W West of the NYO&W and built by Cooke. Railroad Gazette (26 July 1901) notes it was intended for heavy passenger train operation in the summer and milk-train service over the winter. At the time of the article's publication, RG said that the railroad had yet to see if the summer demand required such a design.

According to the roster published in Railroad History Bulletin 175 by William D. Edson, Cooke & Dickson each supplied a locomotive (143/works #2645 & 144/works #1218) in 1901. These were renumbered 149 & 148 in 1903 (and 249 & 248 in 1905). Also in 1903, Cooke delivered 146-147 (renumbered 246-247 in 1905). 143-145 came in 1904 -- they were renumbered 243-245 in 1905. The class was finished off with 10 more engines in 1905 -- 240-242, 250-256.

Apparently the design was something of a hit, even though the first two (143 & 144) suffered a terrible accident on August 3, 1902. Ronald J. Stanulevich's vivid article -- Called Home to Glory: The Disaster at Chiloway Switch -- is published on http://nyow.org/glory.html (viewed 23 Feb 2004). He explains that both were hauling milk trains, a premium service on the railroad that made it the number 1 milk supplier to New York City at the time. Milk Train 12 (#143) had freight cars spliced into the train in an effort to clear overcrowded classification yards. When the engineer inexplicably barged into a section without waiting to meet Milk train #11, the freight cars' lack of air brakes and faulty bypass setups meant the two collided head-on in a "cornfield meet" at a combined 40 mph. Four men were killed in the accident.

Both locomotives were rebuilt, according to Stanulevich. #144 kept her 2-6-0 arrangement, but #143 was rebuilt as U-1 class 4-6-0 #249; see Locobase 9007.

All survived into the 1930s with several seeing out World War II.


New York, Ontario, & Western Class I (Locobase #9002)

Class I Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers30-44
Builderseveral
Year Built1903
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure190
Driver Diameter63
Tractive Effort29393
Grate Area30
Weight on Drivers148000
Locomotive Weight170000
Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. See William D. Edson's roster in Railroad History Bulletin 175 for builder's numbers. He shows that the I class came from two builders. Cooke supplied

10 as a single batch (works #28586-28595 in December 1903 and January 1904) and Baldwin finished the class with 5 in April 1907 (works #30636-30640).

Six were later rebuilt as 4-6-0s; see Locobase 9004. the others (36-44) continued in service until virtually the entire class was scrapped in February-March 1937.


New York, Ontario, & Western Class E (Locobase #9003)

Class E Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers225-228
BuilderAlco-Brooks
Year Built1911
Cylinders(2) 21" x 26"
Boiler Pressure190
Driver Diameter68
Tractive Effort27232
Grate Area47
Weight on Drivers134500
Locomotive Weight181500
Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. See William D. Edson's roster in Railroad History Bulletin 175 for builder's numbers. His accounting shows that Brooks produced these engines as a single batch (works #50035-50038) in May 1911.

Conventional Ten-wheelers with passenger-sized drivers, this quartet served the cash-strapped NYO & W until the late 1940s with 225 & 228 scrapped first in February 1947 and 227 in May 1948.


New York, Ontario, & Western Class U-1 - superheated (Locobase #9007)

Class U-1 - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
BuilderNYO&W
Year Built1916
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort30423
Grate Area80
Weight on Drivers141000
Locomotive Weight184000
Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

As noted in Locobase 4120, 6 of the camelback Moguls put into service on the NYO & W were converted into Ten-wheelers. According to Ronald J. Stanulevich's vivid article -- Called Home to Glory: The Disaster at Chiloway Switch -- published on http://nyow.org/glory.html (viewed 23 Feb 2004) -- #249 gained a reputation as a free-steaming locomotive. "A fine runner", she earned her curious nickname of "Ostrich" in honor of "her good speed and easy gait" and her ability "to really stretch out and run". One factor in such high performance were her relatively tall drivers, although such height must have affected her ability to start a heavy train. Conversion from a Bissell to a front bogie truck undoubtedly contributed to #249's grace as well.

Altogether 9 were converted to a 4-6-0 arrangement (Class U-1) in 1916 (251), 1917 (244, 246, 249, 256), 1919 (250), 1920 (241), 1923 (253), and 1924 (245). In the process, boiler pressure was increased to 200 psi (boosting tractive effort to 30,400 lb), and total engine weight to 184,000 lb.After that, the class was superheated ans supplied with Baker radial valve gear.


New York, Ontario, & Western Class P - superheated (Locobase #9005)

Class P - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers201-220
BuilderNYO&W
Year Built1920
Cylinders(2) 22" x 32"
Boiler Pressure185
Driver Diameter55
Tractive Effort44282
Grate Area87.5
Weight on Drivers180000
Locomotive Weight202000
Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Locobase 3944 describes the original configuration of this camelback Consolidation design.


New York, Ontario, & Western Class U - superheated (Locobase #9006)

Class U - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
BuilderNYO&W
Year Built1920
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure190
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort28901
Grate Area80
Weight on Drivers139800
Locomotive Weight162800
Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Described in its saturated-boiler state in Locobase 4120, this set of camelback Moguls later received superheaters and Baker radial valve gear. Locobase isn't sure when or how many were treated to this overhaul, so the date and count are estimates.


New York, Ontario, & Western Class V - superheated (Locobase #9008)

Class V - superheated Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers271-284
BuilderNYO&W
Year Built1920
Cylinders(2) 21" x 28"
Boiler Pressure190
Driver Diameter63
Tractive Effort31654
Grate Area80
Weight on Drivers155000
Locomotive Weight178200
Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. See William D. Edson's roster in Railroad History Bulletin 175 for builder's numbers. The first four (works #45420-45423) were produced in June 1908 . Price Pancoast Coal Company originally took delivery of the next engine in line - 45424 - as their 100, but later sold it to the NYO&W as 285. Production continued with another 6 (45660-45665) in October. Four more (45841-45844) appeared in January 1909.

Obviously the NYO & W was pleased with the Mogul configuration for its camelbacks and it went back to Alco-Cooke in 1908-1909 for 15 more. Many of these were later superheated and all but one served into the 1940s.


Pennsylvania Class E1 (Locobase #3877)

Class E1 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers10+
BuilderJuniata
Year Built1899
Cylinders(2) 20.5" x 26"
Boiler Pressure185
Driver Diameter80
Tractive Effort21477
Grate Area69.2
Weight on Drivers101550
Locomotive Weight173450
Notice the big anthracite-burning firebox. Data from an article in Railroad Gazette (3 August 1900). Comments in an article on the E-2, which see (RG, 14 September 1900), comment on the "unsatisfactory cab arrangement of the class E-1" although the author does not elaborate. Locobase concludes that such a big grate meant that the fireman and engineer couldn't communicate across the footplate very easily.

In fact, http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/prr820s.jpg (last accessed 20 February 2007) shows that this was a camelback with a Wooten firebox, a very rare type on the Pennsylvania. Locobase contends that this is one of the most stylish looking camelbacks, possibly because the cab rides relatively low on the boiler and the dome, stack, and headlight stand tallest on the profile.


Reading Class D-3p (Locobase #6796)

Class D-3p Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Cylinders(2) 18.5" x 22"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter61.6
Tractive Effort16624
Grate Area68
Weight on Drivers81050
Locomotive Weight114150
Data from Rdg 11 - 1926 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Like many anthracite roads, this Eight-wheeler was a camelback. It's also likely to date from the mid-1880s, although Locobase cannot confirm the date. The boiler's heating surface area seems very low, but is consistent with the number and length of tubes.


Reading Class D-3h (Locobase #3077)

Class D-3h Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Year Built1883
Cylinders(2) 18.5" x 22"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter61.6
Tractive Effort18702
Grate Area63.3
Weight on Drivers87250
Locomotive Weight127800
Data from Rdg 11 - 1926 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

As was the case on many railroads in the anthracite-coal region of Pennsylvania, this Eight-wheeler was a camelback. The arrangement allowed the line to burn the culm resulting from anthracite mining as fuel. The relatively small drivers indicate a mixed-traffic role for this sub-class.


Reading Class D-3h (Locobase #3951)

Class D-3h Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers318-321
BuilderReading
Year Built1889
Cylinders(2) 21" x 22"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter78
Tractive Effort16916
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers76300
Locomotive Weight115700
This locomotive is the subject of a Railroad Gazette essay (22 June 1900) entitled "What is the Ideal Passenger Engine" by SM Prince, Jr., Superintendent of Motive Power and Railway Engineering for the Philadelphia & Reading. The engine was originally built in 1889 and rode on 68 1/2" drivers until Prince took it in hand in 1899 to demonstrate his argument.

"I firmly believe this [a high-drivered Camelback with wide Wootten firebox] to be the ideal type of high-speed passenger engine," declared the Super. What is so fascinating about Prince's assertions is how most of them would be overtaken by history, technology, and especially train demands within months rather than years. Prince, for example, asserted that there was no real value to be gained by adding a trailing truck to a locomotive with two driving axles. "Nothing can be said in favor of the Columbia or Atlantic type," he declared, adding later "Nothing has been accomplished by the Columbia or Atlantic types of engines that can not be more satisfactorily accomplished by the 8-wheel American and 10-wheel types." (Forced to choose between the two, Prince plumps for the 2-4-2 Columbia, further cementing his hold on the adverse trend of history in the face of the consensus that the arrangement rode badly.)

Prince backed up his claims with deeds, building several classes of Camelback 4-4-0s. But the Reading also built several dozen Atlantics, which became known as premium Flyers.


Reading Class M-1a/M-1b (Locobase #8879)

Class M-1a/M-1b Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers618-622, 679-684
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1892
Cylinders(2) 13" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 22" x 26"
Boiler Pressure180
Driver Diameter78
Tractive Effort12777
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers84023
Locomotive Weight131748
Data from Trait pratique de la machine locomotive ... By Maurice Demoulin, 1898

Librairie polytechnique, Baudry et Cie, p 380. Baldwin works #12433, 12672, 12676, 12679-80, 13370, 13408-09, 13411-13413. Additional data from 1907 Catalogue of Mechanical Engineering Collection in the Science Division of the Victoria & Albert Museum (Board of Education South Kensington)., pp 92.

As unusual as the adoption of the Bicycle wheel arrangement was in the US, production of 10 Bicycles with the 4-cylinder Vauclain compound layout was rarer still. They didn't persist in this arrangement for long. One (682) was rebuilt as an Atlantic in May 1899, the others as N-4a camelback Moguls in 1904.

Even then, 5 were scrapped within a few years, while 4 underwent a further transformation as L-6a class 4-6-0s. In only one instance did an engine survive past 1911: 682 (now 315) was rebuilt again as a 4-6-0 (class L-6b) and operated until 1927.


Reading Class (Locobase #2563)

Class Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-2-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers385, 378
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1895
Cylinders(2) 13" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders(2) 22" x 26"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter84.5
Tractive Effort13104
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers48000
Locomotive Weight115000
Data from Bruce (1950).

Strongly resembling the Camelback 4-4-2s of the Atlantic City Railroad, this "Bicycle" was different only in having but one driving axle. Like the Atlantic, this engine was a Vauclain compound and had the camelback layout with the wide Wootten firebox. This accounts for the deceptively low A/S ratio.

According to Baldwin's own history, the engines ran the 90 miles from Jersey City to Philadelphia in 105 minutes, including stops. Despite the claims for lower friction and freer running, however, the locomotive's low factor of adhesion meant it would be overmatched very soon by heavier rolling stock. The two engines were rebuilt as 4-4-0s in 1904 and carried on until the 1930s.


Reading Class D-5f (Locobase #3079)

Class D-5f Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers260-279
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1901
Cylinders(2) 21" x 22"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter68.5
Tractive Effort24078
Grate Area76
Weight on Drivers87680
Locomotive Weight132680
Another in a series of camelback Eight-wheelers, this class was one of the most numerous.


Reading Class L-5a (Locobase #6725)

Class L-5a Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers587-601
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1902
Cylinders(2) 22" x 28"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter69
Tractive Effort33389
Grate Area85
Weight on Drivers147550
Locomotive Weight186650
Data from CNJ 7 - 1944 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Drury (1993) notes that the 111 Camelbacks "were essentially the same locomotive" and served as mixed-traffic engines into the 1950s. This was among the first of the 20th Century batches. Shown in the specs is the result of a superheating upgrade that began in 1919 and that completely rebuilt the locomotives. In 1936, the Reading sold 5 of the engines -- 592-596 -- to the Central RR of New Jersey, which operated them as 631-635.


Reading Class I-8d (Locobase #6452)

Class I-8d Specifications
Wheel Arrangement2-8-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers1611-1615
Buildershops
Year Built1905
Cylinders(2) 23.75" x 30"
Boiler Pressure210
Driver Diameter55.5
Tractive Effort54424
Grate Area90
Weight on Drivers211350
Locomotive Weight235650
Data from Reading erecting diagram of 12 May 1916, which shows evaporative heating surface only. Drury notes that this class of Camelback consolidations, which was built over a 9-year period, was the most numerous on the Philadelphia & Reading. Baldwin and the railroad split orders. The drivers are relatively tall for a 2-8-0.


Reading Class P-6a (Locobase #2809)

Class P-6a Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers300
BuilderReading
Year Built1909
Cylinders(3) 18.5" x 24"
Boiler Pressure225
Driver Diameter80
Tractive Effort29455
Grate Area90
Weight on Drivers106150
Locomotive Weight205400
Another unusual Reading design, this one conceived by chief draftsman Edward O. Elliott. Add to the camelback with its enormous firebox (108" wide) a 3-cylinder layout that originally was compound, later simpled as depicted here. Edwin Alexander (1950) observes that this were the first Reading engines to have Walschaerts valve gear.

Paul T. Warner (RLHS Bulletin #58) supplied the heating surface and weights information, noting that the former included a Taylor superheater. This was a chamber some 3 feet long in the front boiler course. Warner concluded that it was probable " that the device ...gave only a very moderate degree of superheat." He notes that a later upgrade included the Schmidt type of superheater.


Reading Class L-10 (Locobase #4101)

Class L-10 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-6-0
GaugeStd
Road Numbers675-676
BuilderReading
Year Built1911
Cylinders(3) 19" x 24"
Boiler Pressure215
Driver Diameter74
Tractive Effort32095
Grate Area90
Weight on Drivers172600
Locomotive Weight226750
Interesting variation on the 3-cylinder locomotives that the Reading's Edward Elliott was experimenting with. The ten-wheeler layout obviously allowed more weight on the drivers while retaining the favored camelback layout.

Data from Paul T. Warner (RLHS Bulletin #58) shows heating surface area including a Taylor superheater. This area appears to be borne out by the RDG 11 - 1926 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

The 1926 diagram shows before and after configurations.

At the time of the diagram, both locomotives had been reconfigured with two 22" x 26" cylinders. 675 retained its saturated, 215-psi boiler while 676 had been superheated and had a boiler with 154 2" tubes and 26 5 1/4" flues totalling, with the firebox, 2,957 sq ft. . Alas, the diagram does not give the superheater area.


Reading Class P-6b (Locobase #4099)

Class P-6b Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers303
BuilderReading
Year Built1911
Cylinders(3) 19" x 24"
Boiler Pressure240
Driver Diameter80
Tractive Effort33140
Grate Area90
Weight on Drivers108000
Locomotive Weight208000
The second of three trial 3-cylinder camelback Atlantics (talk about an exclusive club!), this engine had a surprisingly high boiler pressure for the time. It was likely reduced soon after the 303 entered service. Data from Paul T. Warner (RLHS Bulletin #58), who notes that the heating surface area includes a Taylor superheater. (See notes for engine 300.)


Reading Class (Locobase #4100)

Class Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers344
BuilderReading
Year Built1912
Cylinders(3) 19" x 24"
Boiler Pressure230
Driver Diameter80
Tractive Effort31759
Grate Area94.5
Weight on Drivers128300
Locomotive Weight233200
It's hard to believe one could fit a larger grate on a camelback Atlantic that this one. Add to the novelty a three-cylinder layout and you have the third of three experiments by Edward Elliott of the Philadelphia & Reading.

Data from Paul T. Warner (RLHS Bulletin #58). Note that the BP is slightly lower than that of 303. Also, Warner notes that the heating surface includes the Schmidt superheater. Warner's best time behind any locomotive came one morning when 344 clipped off 12 miles of descending grade in the Lehigh Valley in 8 min 4 sec or 89 mph.


Reading Class P-5sc/d/e (Locobase #6453)

Class P-5sc/d/e Specifications
Wheel Arrangement4-4-2
GaugeStd
Road Numbers340-343, 345-349
BuilderReading
Year Built1912
Cylinders(2) 23" x 27"
Boiler Pressure200
Driver Diameter86
Tractive Effort28234
Grate Area94.5
Weight on Drivers134500
Locomotive Weight220500
Data from Philadelphia & Reading 9 Sept 1914 erecting diagram for this more conventional Atlantic camelback. The two piston valves each measured 13" in diameter and had 7" travel with 5/16" lead and 1 3/8" lap. The diagram notes that the P-5d has 23" x 26" cylinders with 80" drivers while the P-5e had the 23" x 27" and 86" drivers shown in the specs.

The EHS dropped when the locomotives were superheated. The RDG 11 - 1926 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection do not show superheater area.


St Clair Tunnel Company Class 598 (Locobase #2850)

Class 598 Specifications
Wheel Arrangement0-10-0T
GaugeStd
Road Numbers598-601
BuilderBurnham, Williams & Co
Year Built1891
Cylinders(2) 22" x 28"
Boiler Pressure160
Driver Diameter50
Tractive Effort36861
Grate Area38.6
Weight on Drivers180000
Locomotive Weight180000
A double ended camelback with small drivers, no guiding or trailing trucks, long water tanks and a center cab could only have one of a few purposes. This beast's job was to haul freight trains through the tunnel that connects Detroit, Michigan with Sarnia, Ontario on a ruling grade of 2%. Typical trains amounted to 25-33 loaded cars.

(Alexander, Iron Horse, pl 81). Data from Railroad Gazette (7 Jan 1898). (Alexander gives boiler pressure of 210 psi.)

William E Miller's website dedicated to the history of the St Clair Tunnel -- http://www.trainweb.org/elso/stclair.htm (2 July 2003) -- gives the Baldwin works numbers as 11586, 11589, 11590 & 11595. Although completed as camelback tank engines, they were later given tenders to increase capacity. The side tanks were removed in 1898 ( when the locomotives were renumbered 1301-1304). 1301 and 1304 later had conventional cabs fitted behind the firebox.

Miller adds that by 1908 they were relieved of tunnel duty (because of the suffocation hazard), but soldiered on for a few more years and one more renumbering (2650-2653 in 1910. 2652 was scrapped in 1916 and the others in 1920.


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