Burlington & Missouri River / Chicago, Burlington & Quincy / Colorado & North-Western / Colorado & Southern / Deadwood Central / Iowa & St Louis / Trinity & Brazos Valley / Union Pacifc, Denver & Gulf 2-8-0 "Consolidation" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 397 (Locobase 11774)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 10, p. 256 . Works numbers were 5759 and 5762 in September 1881.

These Wootten wonders were based on the D class Consolidations then entering service on the Burlington in relatively large numbers (Locobase 5478). They burned bituminous soft coal instead of the anthracite culm for which the firebox was designed. 28 sq ft (2.6 sq m) of the firebox heating surface could be found in the combustion chamber. According to a January 1889 report in the Railroading and Engineering Journal (p. 3), the combination of wide grate and soft coal was said "...to give excellent results."

Still, they were somewhat odd ducks. An earlier report in the Locomotive Engineers Journal, Volume 22, No 1 (January 1888), pp. 43-44 includes a discussion by the Burlington G W Rhodes that outlined in detail their shortcomings in CB & Q service: "You will ask, probably, why, if these Wootten engines do the work so thoroughly, we do not have more of them? The reason is partly that our experiments are not thoroughly completed. In the first place we find the fire-box, constructed as these engines are, to be very expensive to maintain. The fire-box doesn't last any length of time; we have to renew it constantly.

"Further than that, with the ordinary fuel, such as we get in Iowa, the ordinary lump fuel, these engines won't steam well. If you use that lump fuel in such a large grate surface you cannot stop up the air passages; there are too large openings among the large lumps of coal, so that the engines won't steam; but when you take this same fuel and crush it the engines steam remarkably well, and without sparks and hardly any smoke. But it is almost impracticable to use the engines in this way, for we cannot get a sufficient quantity of this pea coal, or screenings, to supply the demand for freight engines on a road like the C. B. & Q. I think, then, that in taking up this matter of extension fronts it is going to be Vital with us to consider what kind of fuel we use."

By the time Rhodes spoke, 397 had been transferred to the Hannibal & St Joseph as their 51; 398 would join its sibling in 1891 as 52 and both would be classified D-1. According to Gene Connelly's Baldwin production list, both were renumbered in 1898 as 612-613, but only 612 was rebuilt at that time as a conventional-firebox locomotive with 20" x 25" [sic] cylinders and 50" drivers.

According to Bernard Corbin & William Kerka's compilation in their Steam Locomotives of the Burlington Route, the 612 was taken in by the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern, which in turn merged with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy in 1901. The 613 went to the Kansas City, St Joseph & Council Bluffs as their 613. The KCStJ&CB also merged with the CB&Q in 1901.

Both ended their days as G-4A class 0-6-0s 1625-1626.


Class 6 (Locobase 12420)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 23 p. 44. See also George Woodman Hilton, American Narrow-Gauge Railroads (Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1990), p 514+. Works number was 17795 in May 1900.

The DC connected Galena Junction and Two Bit in the Black Hills of South Dakota. In 1902, the railway came under the Burlington & Missouri River. The B&MR was absorbed by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy in 1904 and this 3-ft gauge line operated the now-renumbered 538 operated for years before going to the scrap pile in December 1930.


Class 644 / B-4-R (Locobase 13036)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 29, p. 255. Works numbers were Works numbers were 30996, 31017-31018, and 31066-31068 in June 1907.

Five of the six in this class were superheated in the mid-1920s; see Locobase 6760.


Class B-4-A - Cooke (Locobase 7684)

Data from C & S 7 -1939 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were 1478-1483 in June 1883, 1484-1487 in July, 1494-1499 in August, 1500-1503 in September.

The Union Pacific, Denver & Gulf took delivery of these little Cooke Consolidations and numbered 198-216. The C & S took over the UP, D & G in 1899 and renumbered them 37-56. John Crandall's roster -- http://home.att.net/~nginfo/roster.htm#b4a, accessed 13 July 2006 -- credits 37-40 to Baldwin.


Class B-4-C (Locobase 6752)

Data from C & S 7 -1939 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Very light-rail Consolidation freight engines that served the branch lines of the Union Pacific, Denver & Gulf as numbers 261-268. The C & S took over the UP, D & G in 1899 and renumbered them as shown in the specs

Compared to the Moguls of two years earlier (Locobase 6751), these were smaller and lighter locomotives. A look at the photograph from Ted Kiercey'sRaildata collection shown on http://www.narrowgauge.org/images/tkcok/m00158.jpg, accessed 13 July 2006, shows a variety of "field modifications": A tall pipe led from the rhomboid spark-arresting cap on the stack itself down to the trackbed. It turns out that the stack is a patented apparatus is called the Ridgway Stack. http://home.att.net/~nginfo/locodetails.htm, also accessed 13 July 1913, gives full details of the design. The purpose was to keep any stray cinders from setting fire to the highly combustible right of way.

John R Crandall, editor of the nginfo site, comments on why he thinks the extra pipe was added: "The most novel aspect of this cinder catcher is the pipe running down the side which deposits the hot cinders along the side of the track, where in theory, they would do the least amount of harm. It seems, however, that if these new cinder catchers had been all that they seemed to be cracked up to be, they would have been adapted to more railroads than the C&S. The top did fold over and can be seen this way in many photos of engines in yards or in snow covered areas, where the threat of fire was greatly reduced. Perhaps there were problems with the screens becoming clogged and reducing the draft."

Between the two old-style steam domes are two cylindrical tanks laid side-by-side across the boiler.

All but one had been scrapped by the end of the 1920s; for some reason, 58 avoided the torch until April 1939.


Class B-4-F - pv (Locobase 2636)

Data fromCatalogue Descriptive of Simple and Compound Locomotives built by Brooks Locomotive Works, Dunkirk, NY (Buffalo, NY: Matthew-Northrup Company, 1899). See also Mike Trent, Rio Grande Southern Railroad Technical Information Page (Vol 3, # 2 - July 1999) on #74 by Mike Trent, published on

http://users.viawest.net/~bdwhite/74b.htm (visited 1 Feb 2004-http://www.riograndesouthern.com/RGSTechPages/_bdwhite/74b.htm.) Works numbers were 2969-2970 in June 1898.

Same data as the Colorado & NorthWestern's #30 (Locobase 2635), but with a different "Code Word" (for use in telegraphy). #30 was Quidam, #32's is Quiddit. The only discernible difference is a change in the shape of the valve chest from a simple slide valve to perhaps a patent version of a piston valve.

Locobase's hunch -- suggested in 2002 -- was borne out by Mike Trent's comments in 2004. He notes that the problems of the outboard-canted slide valves on the first engine of the trio led to the adoption of the inboard piston valves. Trent comments that piston valves tended to "wear out" rather than wearing in (as slide valves did because of the constant pressure on only one side) they needed replacement more often. Even so, the piston valve was better suited for higher-pressure applications.

Both of these locmotives had long careers. The Denver, Boulder & Western sold them to Morse Brothers Machinery & Supply Co, which in turn sold them to the Colorado & Southern as road #75-76. Eventually the pair ended up on Cerro de Pasco Copper Co of Lima, Peru in 1948 and served that producer until the mid-1960s.


Class B-4-F - sv (Locobase 2635)

Data from Catalogue Descriptive of Simple and Compound Locomotives built by Brooks Locomotive Works, Dunkirk, NY (Buffalo, NY: Matthew-Northrup Company, 1899). See also Mike Trent, Rio Grande Southern Railroad Technical Information Page (Vol 3, # 2 - July 1999), published on

http://users.viawest.net/~bdwhite/74b.htm (visited 1 Feb 2004--revisted 3 August 2013 at http://www.riograndesouthern.com/RGSTechPages/_bdwhite/74b.htm.)

) and Martin E Hansen, "Landslide of Emotion", Trains, September 2013, pp. 40-43. Works number was 2951 in April 1898.

See 2636 for the other two locomotives--fitted with piston valves--in this order.

A year after the Colorado & NorthWestern's first engine -- a Brooks-built 2-6-0 -- we see this burlier Consolidation with even smaller drivers. The driving wheel base gains only four inches to permit this more powerful locomotive to work on light, curvy track.

See the full account of engine #74 as it passed through several transformation on Trent says that 30 represented an odd, short-lived choice of valve-chest layout: "In order to set the steam chests containing the engine's flat, or slide, valves under the large 60" diameter smokebox, the chests were canted outboard. This peculiar Brooks design had been applied to some of Brook's recently built standard gauge engines. Unfortunately, increased steam pressure made possible by new boiler technology and size caused an unbalanced load on the old-fashioned slide valves. This in turn caused damage and excessive wear to the traditional Stephenson valve gear, which was "standard" at that time. Also, the sloping nature of the steam chests caused major lubrication problems"

The outboard cant was abandoned in the other two locomotives in favor of inboard piston valves, but 30 kept her difficult-to-operate slide gear for some time.

Hansen's article concerns the fatal landslide that engulfed #30 on 18 April 1901 as it worked with another engine to clear snow from tracks near Ward, Colo. 30's engineer was Hansen's great-grandfather Joseph William Hannum. When the call came to clear the snow, says Hansen, the experienced engineer called for the 30, his "favorite engine" and her sister, #31 as the helper locomotive. Just as the pair of engines was about to break through the last bit of snow blocking the track, an avalanche that began well above them roared down and swept both engines and all four crewmen away. Remarkably, James Marks, the engineer on 31, survived with relatively minor injuries but the other three men were gone.

Both locomotives were recovered, repaired, and returned to service. (The rest of the story of intertwined lives is well worth seeking out and reading.) Trent quotes famed illustrator Howard Fogg, who said in 1981: "In my opinion, the 30, 31, and 32 when delivered from Brooks, were the best proportioned, aesthetically beautiful narrow gauge engines ever built. I love to draw them."

In 1909, the now-bankrupt C&NW was succeeded by the Denver, Boulder & Western. As the DB&W ran into increasing difficulties, it began to sell off its equipment. On 20 January 1921, the Colorado & Southern bought both locomotives. In 1926, says Trent, the Colorado & Southern's George Lundberg of the mechanical department "designed a distinctive, customized Walschaerts valve gear for No.74" that worked to free up the Johnson bar and greatly ease the engineer's job.

Clinton Eshe, long-time C&S engineer, was quoted by Trent as saying in 1983:"Those DB&W engines were real popular with the engineers, because they always had steam and pulled their tonnage and had plenty of 'snap' on the throttle. They was great engines."

See Trent's full account at the link shown above. Later 74 operated in tourist service from 1948 to 1952 when the Rio Grande Southern closed. Although surveyed for a possible operational rebuild, the 74 was too far gone. But it was salvageable for cosmetic restoration and display. And, after years of effort, the 74's restoration was completed in May 2012. See the Narrow Gauge Railroad Discussion Forum thread that began on 30 April 2012 at http://ngdiscussion.net/phorum/read.php?1,215763,215763#msg-215763.


Class B-4-M (Locobase 8322)

Data from the C&S 6 - 1941 Locomotive Diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. (NB: Page 95, Volume 21 is missing from the DeGolyer Library collection available online.) Works numbers were 15608-15612 in December 1897 and 17178 in December 1899; 17653 in April 1900.

This class was ordered by a C&S predecessor., which was absorbed in 1898. The last two were delivered with C&S road numbers.

The class was dismantled in the late 1920s.


Class B-4-P (Locobase 1335)

Data from C & S 7 -1939 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

The result of a trial of three builders' locomotives in which Rhode Island outdid Baldwin (B-4M #428, the last of a 7-engine run) and Cooke (B-4N; works #2510). Drury (1993) describes the winner as having a higher boiler and taller drivers. These left service between 1937 and 1946.


Class B-4-R (Locobase 1337)

Data from C & S 7 -1939 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection

Juiced-up versions of the B-4Ps ordered a year earlier, these were considerably bigger. Rhode Island built the first 10, Richmond followed a year later (1902) with 15, and Brooks supplied 19 in 1906. Baldwin's 6 B-4R1 engines (1907) had slide valves instead of piston valves and sported other changes in the smokebox and cab.

Many of the class were later superheated. The class operated until 1960, although retirements began as soon as the later 1920s.


Class B-4-R1 (Locobase 6760)

Data from C & S 7 -1939 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Beginning in 1924, all of the B-4-Rs first delivered as saturated engines (Locobase 13036) but 649 were superheated and fitted with piston valves.

The class left service over a long period, the first in 1934, the last in 1960.


Class B-4-S - compound (Locobase 6759)

Data from C & S 6 - 1941 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Firebox heating surface included 12.3 sq ft of arch tubes.

These tandem compounds were among the most successful compounds in US service, Drury (1993) notes, and weren't converted to a simple-expansion configuration shown in Locobase 8323 until 1924-1926. Indeed, they were superheated first and retrofitted with 12" piston valves.


Class B-4-S - simpled (Locobase 8323)

Data from C & S 7 -1939 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Firebox heating surface included 12.3 sq ft of arch tubes.

As noted in Locobase 6759, the tandem compounds purchased by the C & S in 1903 proved so satisfactory that they were superheated first. Only in 1924-1926 were they converted to the simple-expansion layout shown in the specs and given outside Walschaert radial valve gear to supply the new cylinders. After their conversions, the former compounds retired over a long period of time, the first leaving in 1939, the last in 1956.


Class B-4Q1 (Locobase 11364)

Data from "Equipment and Supplies: Locomotive Building, Railway Age Gazette, Vol 43 (27 September 1907), p. 369. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 29, p. 270. Works numbers were 31097-31098, 31149-31150, 3164, 31172 in June 1907; 31197-31198 in July.

According to Drury (1993), p. 134-135, these had the same power dimensions as several other C & S batches, "but a much smaller boiler." The result: "They were extremely poor steamers and quickly placed in local freight and switching service." In order to pay for some 4-6-0s, the class was sold to the Fort Worth & Denver City in 1908. There, they "...performed little better on the level plains of Texas than they did in Colorado and Wyoming, and all but one were scrapped by 1935."


Class D (Locobase 5478)

Data from the locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/D/d1old.tif (accessed 22 March 2003) and DeGolyer, Vol 9, p. 113 and Vol 10a, p. 203 . Works numbers were

1879

June 4682-4683

1880

June 5146, 5150, 5179, 5181; August 5202-5203

1881

June 5692, 5696; July 5717, 5719, 5729, 5734; August 5749, 5752

1882

July 6296, 6298, 6301, 6308, 6313; August 6327-6328

1884

May 7327-7328; June 7331, 7337, 7342-7343, 7351-7352, 7359, 7361.

A numerous class of Consolidations that operated on the Burlington & Missouri River; Kansas City, St Joseph & Council Bluffs, and the Hannibal & St Joseph. Most were converted to 0-6-0 switchers and redesignated G-4.

See Locobase 11774 for the Wootten-firebox camelback pair that arrived on the road in 1881.


Class D-1 (Locobase 5481)

Data from the locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/D/d287.tif (accessed 22 March 2003). See also DeGolyer, Vol 12, p. 59. Corbin & Kerka's (1960) description of all the early Consolidations covers several batches, but overall, this seems to be the best fit between the diagram marked "D old" and their information. Works numbers were 7327-7328 in May 1884, 7331, 7337, 7342-7343, 7351-7352, 7359, 7361 in June.

These were converted to G-4A 0-6-0 switchers.


Class D-2 (Locobase 5479)

Data from the locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/D/d287.tif (accessed 22 March 2003). See also DeGolyer, Volume 14, p. 68Baldwin works numbers were 8939, 8942-8943, 8951 in December 1887; 8990-8993, 8995-8996, 8998, 9001 in January 1888; 9063-9064, 9066-9067, 9069, 9074-9075, 9084 in February; 9633-9634, 9636, 9639-9640

These larger Consolidations had fireboxes that rode above the axles, thus gaining 10" (254 mm) of grate width .The first 25 were built by Baldwin in 1887-1888 with the Burlington shops at Aurora and West Burlington adding five more. Almost all were converted to G-4 class 0-8-0 switchers, many before 1910. Three served out their days as 2-8-0s and were retired in 1922.


Class D-3 (Locobase 5484)

Data from the locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/D/d37193b.tif (accessed 22 March 2003).

Locobase is puzzled by this diagram. It's clearly different from the other D3 (see Locobase 3278), which appears as "pre-1912" in Beck's series.

This was a much larger Consolidation than the Burlington had operated before. Its grate, boiler dimensions, number of tubes (though not length), axle loading -- all pointed to a more powerful freight hauler. Although the class had a Belpaire firebox, however, its volume was not remarkably high.


Class D-4A (Locobase 5485)

Data from CB&Q Asstd Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Delivered to CB&Q subsidiaries (most likely Hannibal & St Joseph and Burlington & Missouri River). This entry represents the Alco order. See Locobase 11468 for the Baldwins that came in the same year. Both the Alcos and the Baldwins had 12" piston valves.

Drury (1993) comments that these engines proved less well-suited to requirements than the lighter Prairies or the 2-8-2s that followed shortly afterward. See Locobase 425 for the result when the Burlington equipped these engines with Emerson superheaters.


Class D-4A superheated (Locobase 425)

Originally delivered to CB&Q subsidiaries by Alco-Schenectady in 1903 (Locobase 5485), these locomotives were superheated by the CB&Q not long after they entered service.

They retained the power dimensions of the original locomotives, although Locobase is not sure if the 12"(305 mm) piston valves were supplied in 1903. The superheaters were the relatively inefficient Emerson design, which may have suited the slow freights they hauled during their years of service.

Over the course of almost two decades, the Burlington withdrew all of the locomotives in this class, the last leaving in 1946.


Class D-4B (Locobase 11468)

Data from CB&Q Asstd Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Works numbers were

B & MR 21675-21676, 21690, 21695 in February 1903; 21743-21744, 21762, 21765, 21802, 21806, 21821, 21849, 21858, 21869, 21892 in March (Road numbers 3310-3316, 3326-3333)

H & St J 21899, 21915, 21943, 21953, 21960, 21977, 21985, 22075-22076 in April 1903; 22214 in May (Road numbers 693-700, 860-861)

Baldwin delivered these Consolidations to CB&Q subsidiaries Burlington & Missouri River and the Hannibal & St Joseph. This entry represents the Baldwin order delivered with a little less firebox heating surface, but 29 more tubes and more total evaporative heating surface They also rode a little lighter than the Alcos. The original Baldwin spec shows that they were delivered with 12" piston valves.

These were soon superheated; see Locobase 11469.


Class D-4B superheated (Locobase 11469)

Data from CB&Q Asstd Steam Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

When the Burlington added an Emerson superheater to the Baldwin boilers of the D-4B Consolidations, they managed to retain more of the small tubes than when they performed the same surgery on their Alco-built D-4As (Locobase 425). The Emerson was relatively inefficient and the installation didn't contribute a substantial percentage of area to the boiler in any case. Locobase does not know for sure that the 12" piston valves were added at the same time, but suspects as much.

The D-4Bs were withdrawn in the late 1920s-early 1930s, except the 3188 for some reason, which endured until November 1940.


Class D-7 (Locobase 7691)

Data from CB&Q 3 - 1953 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection and from the locomotive diagram published on Vernon Beck's website -- http://home.earthlink.net/~vnlbeck/D/d77194b.tif (accessed 22 March 2003). Works numbers were 22390, 22408 in June 1903.

Delivered to the I & StL shortly before its takeover by the Burlington, this pair of light Consolidations were quite modest in their design and performance. Baldwin built them as single units (works# 22390, 22408). Like the parent road's 2-8-0s, they were not really well suited to the Burlington's freight requirements and both were out of service in November 1928.


Class Q / D3 (Locobase 3278)

These engines were described in the 26 August 1898 Railroad Gazette as being headed for the Black Hills. The B&MR was part of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and the latter's Superintendent of Motive Power was credited with the "direction" of this design. Its capacity was to be 50% greater than the engines then in use, making it capable of pulling 15 loads where the others could only manage 10.

Drury (1993) comments that the Consolidation didn't get much use on the CB&Q, the railroad preferring their Prairies for light freight service.

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 1845-1848 (August 1898).

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class3976644 / B-4-RB-4-A - CookeB-4-C
Locobase ID11774 12420 13036 7684 6752
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Deadwood Central (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class816166
Road Numbers397-398 / 51-52 / 612-6136 / 496 /538644-64941-5657-62
GaugeStd3'Std3'3'
Number Built816166
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoCookeRhode Island
Year18811900190718831886
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.75' 9.92'15.33'11.33'11.33'
Engine Wheelbase22.83'17'23.67'17.96'17.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.58 0.65 0.63 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.50'59.73'47.58'50.50'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)14050 lbs15920 lbs
Weight on Drivers88000 lbs87500 lbs174500 lbs54600 lbs61690 lbs
Engine Weight100000 lbs96500 lbs193500 lbs62900 lbs71030 lbs
Tender Light Weight142000 lbs49833 lbs48330 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight335500 lbs112733 lbs119360 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals2000 gals8000 gals1600 gals2200 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)2608 gals5 tons6 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)37 lb/yard36 lb/yard73 lb/yard23 lb/yard26 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter50"38"57"37"37"
Boiler Pressure130 psi180 psi200 psi145 psi150 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 24"17" x 20"22" x 28"15" x 18"16" x 18"
Tractive Effort21216 lbs23272 lbs40418 lbs13491 lbs15879 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.15 3.76 4.32 4.05 3.89
Heating Ability
Firebox Area165 sq. ft82 sq. ft209 sq. ft92.13 sq. ft93.50 sq. ft
Grate Area76 sq. ft20 sq. ft32.70 sq. ft13.80 sq. ft13.80 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1134 sq. ft1441 sq. ft2555 sq. ft809 sq. ft842 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1134 sq. ft1441 sq. ft2555 sq. ft809 sq. ft842 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume129.95274.26207.40219.74201.01
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation98803600654020012070
Same as above plus superheater percentage98803600654020012070
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2145014760418001335914025
Power L124324016555230842892
Power MT243.71404.74280.57498.10413.41

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassB-4-F - pvB-4-F - svB-4-MB-4-PB-4-R
Locobase ID2636 2635 8322 1335 1337
RailroadColorado & North-Western (CB&Q)Colorado & North-Western (CB&Q)Union Pacifc, Denver & Gulf (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class227544
Road Numbers76/3230-31 / 74-75103-107/422-428451-455600-643
Gauge3'3'StdStdStd
Number Built227544
BuilderBrooksBrooksBurnham, Williams & CoRhode Islandseveral
Year18981898189719001901
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase10.67'10.67'15'15.33'15.33'
Engine Wheelbase18.33'18.33'22.67'23.67'23.67'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.58 0.58 0.66 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)43.75'43.75'51.50'51.85'53.42'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)38780 lbs46320 lbs
Weight on Drivers86000 lbs86000 lbs126700 lbs144000 lbs175000 lbs
Engine Weight94500 lbs94500 lbs142800 lbs163360 lbs194180 lbs
Tender Light Weight67000 lbs67000 lbs115500 lbs104200 lbs112880 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight161500 lbs161500 lbs258300 lbs267560 lbs307060 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3100 gals3100 gals6000 gals8500 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)7 tons7 tons12 tons8 tons10 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)36 lb/yard36 lb/yard53 lb/yard60 lb/yard73 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter37"37"51"56"56"
Boiler Pressure180 psi180 psi180 psi185 psi205 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)16" x 20"16" x 20"20" x 26"21" x 28"22" x 28"
Tractive Effort21172 lbs21172 lbs31200 lbs34674 lbs42169 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.06 4.06 4.06 4.15 4.15
Heating Ability
Firebox Area130 sq. ft130 sq. ft168.70 sq. ft171.30 sq. ft210.53 sq. ft
Grate Area19.30 sq. ft19.30 sq. ft24.70 sq. ft32.65 sq. ft34.66 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1289 sq. ft1289 sq. ft2032 sq. ft2223 sq. ft2992 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1289 sq. ft1289 sq. ft2032 sq. ft2223 sq. ft2992 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume276.95276.95214.94198.05242.87
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation34743474444660407105
Same as above plus superheater percentage34743474444660407105
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2340023400303663169143159
Power L146244624465447376282
Power MT474.15474.15323.92290.09316.56

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassB-4-R1B-4-S - compoundB-4-S - simpledB-4Q1D
Locobase ID6760 6759 8323 11364 5478
RailroadColorado & Southern (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)Colorado & Southern (CB&Q)Trinity & Brazos Valley (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class61212830
Road Numbers644-649520-531520-53132-39325-326
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1212830
BuilderC&SRhode IslandRhode IslandBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & Co
Year19241903192419071879
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonWalschaertStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.33'15.33'15.33'16'14.75'
Engine Wheelbase23.69'22'22'24.50'22.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.70 0.70 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)59.75'56.50'56.50'46.40'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)49650 lbs46375 lbs46375 lbs
Weight on Drivers175250 lbs181700 lbs181700 lbs157000 lbs87830 lbs
Engine Weight194650 lbs206100 lbs206100 lbs176500 lbs101800 lbs
Tender Light Weight142000 lbs151666 lbs151666 lbs142000 lbs61950 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight336650 lbs357766 lbs357766 lbs318500 lbs163750 lbs
Tender Water Capacity8000 gals8000 gals8000 gals8000 gals2900 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons12.5 tons12.5 tons10 tons7.1 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)73 lb/yard76 lb/yard76 lb/yard65 lb/yard37 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"56"56"57"52"
Boiler Pressure200 psi210 psi210 psi200 psi145 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)22" x 28"16" x 32"22.5" x 32"20" x 28"20" x 24"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)28" x 32" (2)
Tractive Effort40418 lbs39369 lbs51638 lbs33404 lbs22754 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.34 4.62 3.52 4.70 3.86
Heating Ability
Firebox Area209 sq. ft195.90 sq. ft195.90 sq. ft202 sq. ft138 sq. ft
Grate Area32.70 sq. ft48 sq. ft48 sq. ft32.50 sq. ft27.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2219 sq. ft2299 sq. ft2299 sq. ft2169 sq. ft1281 sq. ft
Superheating Surface475 sq. ft455 sq. ft455 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2694 sq. ft2754 sq. ft2754 sq. ft2169 sq. ft1281 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume180.13308.73156.12213.04146.79
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6540100801008065003988
Same as above plus superheater percentage7717117941179465003988
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4932448133481334040020010
Power L1116286337981459332838
Power MT585.11307.55476.30333.25284.95

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD-1D-2D-3D-4AD-4A superheated
Locobase ID5481 5479 5484 5485 425
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Burlington & Missouri River (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class1030475100
Road Numbers449-458173-197, 198-2023000-30033100-3175
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1030475
BuilderBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoAlco-Schenectadyseveral
Year1884188718981903
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.75'14.75'15'15.67'15.67'
Engine Wheelbase22.83'22.83'23.50'24.50'24.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.65 0.64 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)46.40'47.79'56.75'57.62'58.48'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)24900 lbs30470 lbs43100 lbs48200 lbs
Weight on Drivers87830 lbs101820 lbs164400 lbs179200 lbs179200 lbs
Engine Weight101800 lbs118310 lbs183500 lbs202600 lbs202600 lbs
Tender Light Weight61950 lbs74000 lbs141000 lbs150200 lbs150200 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight163750 lbs192310 lbs324500 lbs352800 lbs352800 lbs
Tender Water Capacity2900 gals3480 gals8000 gals8000 gals8000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)7.1 tons8 tons14 tons14 tons14 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)37 lb/yard42 lb/yard69 lb/yard75 lb/yard75 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter52"50"52"57"57"
Boiler Pressure160 psi150 psi180 psi200 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 24"20" x 24"22" x 28"22" x 28"22" x 28"
Tractive Effort25108 lbs24480 lbs39874 lbs40418 lbs40418 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.50 4.16 4.12 4.43 4.43
Heating Ability
Firebox Area163.20 sq. ft164 sq. ft171.40 sq. ft254.05 sq. ft260 sq. ft
Grate Area27.64 sq. ft34.72 sq. ft48 sq. ft54.20 sq. ft54.20 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1292 sq. ft1555 sq. ft2984 sq. ft3769 sq. ft2873 sq. ft
Superheating Surface467 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface1292 sq. ft1555 sq. ft2984 sq. ft3769 sq. ft3340 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume148.05178.19242.23305.95233.21
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation4422520886401084010840
Same as above plus superheater percentage4422520886401084012358
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2611224600308525081059280
Power L1335034024864777212918
Power MT336.35294.64260.91382.46635.70

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassD-4BD-4B superheatedD-7Q / D3
Locobase ID11468 11469 7691 3278
RailroadChicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q)Iowa & St Louis (CB&Q)Burlington & Missouri River (CB&Q)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class252524
Road Numbers3176-32007-8 / 3030-3031333-336
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built2524
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoCB&QBurnham, Williams & CoPittsburgh
Year190319031898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.67'15.67'15'15'
Engine Wheelbase24.33'24.50'23'23.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.64 0.65 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)57.62'58.48'53'53.17'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)48200 lbs38200 lbs
Weight on Drivers176700 lbs176700 lbs128800 lbs166000 lbs
Engine Weight200000 lbs200000 lbs143600 lbs180000 lbs
Tender Light Weight150200 lbs150200 lbs100000 lbs98600 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight350200 lbs350200 lbs243600 lbs278600 lbs
Tender Water Capacity8000 gals8000 gals5000 gals5000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)14 tons14 tons tons10 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)74 lb/yard74 lb/yard54 lb/yard69 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter57"57"56"52"
Boiler Pressure200 psi200 psi180 psi180 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)22" x 28"22" x 28"20" x 26"22" x 28"
Tractive Effort40418 lbs40418 lbs28414 lbs39874 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.37 4.37 4.53 4.16
Heating Ability
Firebox Area205.50 sq. ft239.50 sq. ft160.30 sq. ft188.60 sq. ft
Grate Area54.05 sq. ft54.05 sq. ft30.70 sq. ft31.67 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface3947 sq. ft3083 sq. ft1888 sq. ft2675 sq. ft
Superheating Surface456 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3947 sq. ft3539 sq. ft1888 sq. ft2675 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume320.40250.26199.71217.14
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation108101081055265701
Same as above plus superheater percentage108101221555265701
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area41100541272885433948
Power L176721293247794582
Power MT382.88645.39327.20243.41

Photos

Reference


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