New York, Ontario & Western / New York, Ontario, & Western 2-8-0 "Consolidation" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class P (Locobase 3944)

Typical anthracite-burning camelback delivered to the NYO&W at the turn of the 20th century as described in . Railroad Gazette (23 March 1900). This locomotive was intended for pusher service on coal trains, according to George W. West, Superintendent of Motive Power, who designed it.

Cooke delivered the class over 4 years, the last three arriving in March 1904. All of them remained in service until the late 1940s.

See William D. Edson's roster in Railroad History Bulletin 175 for builder's numbers. Note that the first 14 had Cooke serials (2509, 2566-2568, 2646-2651, 2710-2713) and the last 6 were blended into the total Alco count (26242-26244, 29286-29288).


Class P - superheated (Locobase 9005)

Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Locobase 3944 describes the original configuration of this camelback Consolidation design.


Class S (Locobase 3150)

Data from McShane (1899), supplemented by D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

A typical anthracite-road camelback freight engine pair of the turn of the century; although this design - Dickson works #911-912 -- is relatively small. They were delivered as compounds, but didn't stay with the NY, O & W for long.

The D & H diagram book reveals that these engines were sold to the D & H in 1896 and renumbered 93-94 (and later 700-701) as their class E. They were disposed of by 1927.


Class S (Locobase 11381)

Data from McShane (1899), supplemented by D&HCo 1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

A typical anthracite-road camelback freight engine pair of the turn of the century; although this design - Dickson works #911-912 -- is relatively small. They were delivered as compounds, but didn't stay with the NY, O & W for long.

The D & H diagram book reveals that these engines were sold to the D & H in 1896 and renumbered 93-94 (and later 700-701) as their class E. They were disposed of by 1927.


Class S (Locobase 11382)

Data from "Essais comparatifs d'un train anglais et d'un train americain," Bulletin de la Commission internationale du CongrFs des chemins de fer, Volume 8, pp. 736-751. (extracted from Railroad Gazette, 30 March 1894, p.225).

Works numbers were 873-877 in July 1892; 878-882 in August; 883-884 in September; 885-887 in October.

A typical anthracite-road camelback freight engine pair of the turn of the century; although this design -


Class W / W-2 (Locobase 11360)

Data from "Equipment and Supplies: Locomotive Building, Railway Age Gazette, Vol 48 (25 February 1910), p. 433. See William D. Edson's roster in Railroad History Bulletin 175 for builder's numbers. It shows that production of this class began in July 1910 with 48137-48142 and 48355-48363. Six months later, the class resumed with works #49410-49415 and ended in February 1911 with 49704-49709.

After building up a big stud of camelback Consolidations, the NYO & W chose a conventional-firebox design for its last procurement of new 2-8-0s. The axles were made of nickel steel with Cyprus bronze journal bearings, the driving boxes of cast steel holding sectional bronze bearings, wheel centers of cast steel. Locobase reproduces the list of suppliers to this class to preserve the network of names that meant US locomotive building before World War One:

Bell ringer Sanson

Boiler lagging Ehrets sectional magnesia

Brakes American

Brake-beams Kewanee

Brake-shoes IVrfeeto; Am. Brake-Shoe Co.

Couplers Gould pilot

Headlight 18-in. Dressel

Injector No. 10 Simplex

Piston and valve rod packings King

Safety valve Consolidated. 3-ln.

Sanding devices Hanlon

sight-feed lubricators Nathan, No. 9

Springs Railway Steel-Spring Co.

Staying "Tate" and "Hreakless" bolts

Steam gages Ashcroft, 6%-in.

Tires MIdvale, flanged

Tubes Spellerlzed

Valve gear Baker-Pllliod

The tender frame was made of Commonwealth cast steel as well.

Like most of the rest, these came from Alco's Cooke works in Paterson, New Jersey. Mal Houck notes that the "Long Johns" were rough-riders at first "...with small drivers and firebox supported by the fourth driver set, but ride was somewhat improved when these engines were successively shopped and returned to service with 5" thick driver tires that served to increase overall driver size to 58" from the original 56" with 3" thick tires. The thicker tires were called "Balloon Tires" and the additional steel of the larger tires added unsprung weight that could account for at least a marginally improved ride."

The Not Young, Old & Weary moved the air pumps to the front pilot decks to reduce the adhesion weight below the automatic-stoker minimum of 190,000 lb on the drivers on all but six of the class (According to the NYO &W historical website, the locomotives so modified were 302-311, 313, 315, and 319-326). An unlooked for result of doing so, according to Houck, was that "...the equalization was so altered that they frequently derailed while backing with any load coupled to the rear."

The class was superheated in the 1920s; see Locobase 9009.


Class W/W-2 (Locobase 9009)

Data from NYO&W 1 - 1943 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

As noted in Locobase 11360, the Ws had issues with ride quality and tracking. But for two reasons (The NYO &W was not a wealthy road and these were powerful and relatively new Consolidations), the class was superheated in the 1920s.

The result was a still more powerful locomotive with a high superheat ratio that created t hot, dry steam.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassPP - superheatedSSS
Locobase ID3944 9005 3150 11381 11382
RailroadNew York, Ontario, & WesternNew York, Ontario, & WesternNew York, Ontario & WesternNew York, Ontario & WesternNew York, Ontario & Western
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class20202215
Road Numbers201-220201-220191-192191-192166-180
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built202215
BuilderCookeNYO&WDicksonDicksonDickson
Year19001920189318931892
Valve GearStephensonBakerStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase15.42'15.42'14.75'14.75'14.75'
Engine Wheelbase23.75'22.92'22.92'22.92'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.64 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)59.77'49.09'49.09'49.08'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)45000 lbs0
Weight on Drivers170200 lbs180000 lbs111000 lbs111000 lbs109000 lbs
Engine Weight198130 lbs202000 lbs135000 lbs135000 lbs126000 lbs
Tender Light Weight98000 lbs132000 lbs0
Total Engine and Tender Weight296130 lbs334000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4500 gals7000 gals3000 gals3000 gals4319 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons12.7 tons tons tons0 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)71 lb/yard75 lb/yard46 lb/yard46 lb/yard45 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter55"55"50"50"50"
Boiler Pressure200 psi185 psi160 psi160 psi160 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 32"22" x 32"20" x 24"20" x 24"20" x 24"
Tractive Effort43619 lbs44282 lbs26112 lbs26112 lbs26112 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.90 4.06 4.25 4.25 4.17
Heating Ability
Firebox Area194 sq. ft200 sq. ft201.93 sq. ft201.93 sq. ft147 sq. ft
Grate Area87.40 sq. ft87.50 sq. ft80 sq. ft80 sq. ft80 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface3289 sq. ft2348 sq. ft1887 sq. ft1887 sq. ft1628 sq. ft
Superheating Surface726 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3289 sq. ft3074 sq. ft1887 sq. ft1887 sq. ft1628 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume256.39166.77216.23216.23186.56
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1748016188128001280012800
Same as above plus superheater percentage1748020073128001280012800
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3880045880323093230923520
Power L1608711903442644263610
Power MT315.38583.15351.63351.63292.06

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassW / W-2W/W-2
Locobase ID11360 9009
RailroadNew York, Ontario, & WesternNew York, Ontario, & Western
CountryUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-0
Number in Class2626
Road Numbers301-326301-326
GaugeStdStd
Number Built26
BuilderAlco-CookeNYO&W
Year19101920
Valve GearBakerBaker
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase16'
Engine Wheelbase24.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)60.81'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)47950 lbs
Weight on Drivers182000 lbs191500 lbs
Engine Weight205000 lbs215900 lbs
Tender Light Weight172500 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight388400 lbs
Tender Water Capacity7000 gals8000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)11 tons16 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)76 lb/yard80 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter55"52"
Boiler Pressure200 psi190 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)21" x 32"22" x 32"
Tractive Effort43619 lbs48102 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.17 3.98
Heating Ability
Firebox Area205 sq. ft205 sq. ft
Grate Area49.80 sq. ft50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface3218 sq. ft2566 sq. ft
Superheating Surface682 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3218 sq. ft3248 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume250.85182.26
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation99609500
Same as above plus superheater percentage996011495
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4100047130
Power L1606411379
Power MT293.82524.00

Photos

Reference


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