Allegheny Valley / Buffalo, New York & Philadelphia / Cornwall & Lebanon / Cumberland Valley / Grand Rapids & Indiana / Pennsylvania / Pennsylvania & Northwestern / Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis / Western New York & Pennsylvania 2-8-0 "Consolidation" Locomotives of the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1 / 3685 (Locobase 12028)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 17, p. 252 and Volume 23, p. 38.. Works number was 12632 in April 1892 and 17876 in June 1900.

These relatively large Vauclain compound Consolidations had 10 1/2" diameter piston valves. The only significant difference between the 1 and the 2, which came 8 years later, was an incrrease in boiler pressure to 200 psi.

Both served the C & L until that short line was absorbed by the Pennsylvania in 1918. Apparently not converted to simple-expansion during their career, both were sold for scrap in short order. The 03686 in February 1922 going to Michlovitz and 03865 to J Caplan in July 1923.


Class 110 (Locobase 8458)

Data from DeGolyer, Volume 15, p. 254. Works number is 9739-9740 in January 1889.

(Note: Official name for the Cotton Belt was St. Louis-Southwestern.)

This pair of Consolidations was delivered to the WNY&P Railroad, a railroad incorporated in 1887 as a result of the organization of the Buffalo, New York & Philadelphia. The design was a relatively large and powerful 2-8-0 when delivered.

(The WNY&P Railway emerged from the railroad's bankruptcy in 1895 and was leased by the Pennsylvania in 1900.)

After a renumbering to 158-159, the two 2-8-0s went to the Pennsylvania in 1902 as 6284-6285.

The PRR sold both to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment in May 1908. SI&E sold the ex-6284 to the Pittsburgh, Somerset & Westmoreland of Ligonier, PA as their #6. Ex-6285 went to the Saint Louis-Southwestern (aka the Cotton Belt) in 1908.

This latter engine didn't stay on the Cotton Belt for long, moving to the Blytheville, Leachville & Arkansas Southern in December 1910; see Locobase 16069 for the 7's career and new boiler..


Class 163/H odd (Locobase 11648)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 15, p. 232. Works numbers were 10567-10568, 10575, 10597, 10608, 10610 in January 1890.

Although its evaporative heating surface fell in the upper half of Consolidations built in that period, this class's firebox and grate were quite small for the time.

When the PRR bought the WNY & P in 1902, it took the class and put them in H odd along with several other orphan 2-8-0s. All had been sold to Southern Iron & Equipment by 1913.

6291 found a buyer early as it traveled to Cimmaron, Colo August 1907 to operate on the Cimmaron & Northern as the road's #1.

6289 went to the Gilmore & Pittsburg of Armstead, Idaho in September 1909 as their #13. Scrapping came in December 1920.

6294 stay at SI&E ended in July 1912 when the Cornie Valley of Wesson, Ark bought the engine and gave it number 9. The road was dismantled in 1928 and presumably the 9 was scrapped.

6293 ventured north to Massachusetts in September 1912 to operate as #15 on the Hoosac Tunnel & Wilmington.

6292 languished for six years at SI&E before the reseller found a buyer May 1913 in the Tennessee Railway as their #23. Logger Sabine Tramway bought the 23 in 1917 when the TRR folded and owned it until its scrapping in 1931.

6290's stay at SI&E lasted until September 1913 when she was bought by Louisiana Saw Mill of Alexandria, La.


Class 169/H odd (Locobase 16215)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 17, p. 49. Works numbers were 11990, 11992-11993, 11997, 11999 in June 1891; and 12008 in July 1891.

This sextet was an only slightly different design from the 1890 locomotives shown in Locobase 11648, but it included cylinders with two-inch (50.8 mm) longer strokes and a wider, shallower firebox.

Locobase 11994 shows the original Vauclain compound built as a variant of this class. Before too long, it too emerged as a simple-expansion sister to the other six. In 1902, the Pennsylvania absorbed the WNY&P and placed thes engines in the H odd class as 6294-6301.

In October 1911, the Pennsy sold the 6301 to locomotive recycler/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment, which sold it on 28 April 1913 to the Atlantic & Western of Sanford, NC as their #6. The A & W ran it until the early 1920s.


Class 175 (Locobase 11994)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 17, p. 97. works number was 12031 in July 1891.

A variant of the Consolidations that were delivered to the WNY&P at the same time (Locobase 16215), this Vauclain compound had relatively large 10 1/2" (267 mm) piston valves that jointly served both the HP and LP cylinders. Before long, the 175 was rebuilt with 19" x 26" cylinders; see Locobase 16215.


Class 176/H odd (Locobase 6631)

Data from 1919 MD&G [Memphis, Dallas & Gulf] locomotive diagram book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 22, p. 184. Works numbers were 17119-17122 in October 1899.

These were the last Consolidations built for the WNY&P and showed a signficant rise in tractive effort from the earlier engines shown in Locobases 11648, 16215, and 11994. This was particularly due to the substantial increase in boiler pressure as well as a slightly larger boiler. Otherwise, the locomotives didn't represent ground-breaking changes.

After their takeover by the Pennsylvania and subsequent exile to Class H odd, the four were sold to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment. 6302 was sold in December 1909 to the Tennessee Central as their 23. Soon renumbered 23 and again to 330. A little more than a year later, SI&E sold 6304 to the TC in March 1911 and took first 31 then 331. 331 suffered a boiler explosion in May 1942 and was scrapped a month later.

6303 went first to the Tennessee Railway in February 1910 and took road 22. The TRR sold it back to SI&E in , SI&E bored the cylinders out to 20", then sold it to the TC as their 32/332.

6305 took an entirely different path when the SI&E sold it in September 1911 to Louisiana Railway & Navigation as their 88. Successor Louisiana & Arkansas kept #88 until its scrapping in March 1934.


Class 2 / H (Locobase 12424)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 23, p. 79. works number was 17876 in July 1900.


Class 37 / H odd (Locobase 12017)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 17, p. 194. Works numbers were 12436-12440, 12445-12447, 12460 in January 1892; 12496, 12464 in February.

Part of the rush of Vauclain compound orders, these ten engines were typical Consolidations as fitted with the system that featured HP and LP cylinders on each side driving on common crossheads and fed by 10 1/2" diameter piston valves.

Within months of the P & NW's absorption by the Pennsy, the class was converted to simple expansion using two 20" x 24" cylinders. Given their small size, however, it isn't difficult to understand why the Pennsy would scrap the class entirely in 1912 (2) and 1913 (8).


Class 39 (Locobase 9155)

Data from Clinch 1943ca Locomotive Diagrams book supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 11, p.65. Baldwin works numbers were 6698, 6701, 6709, 6713 in April 1883, 6765 in May.

The BNY & P's Consolidations featured a firebox with corrugated sidewalls (for strength, presumably, because the corrugations were only 1/4" deep).

The Western New York Railroad Archive (http://wnyrails.org/railroads/prr/bnyp_home.htm, last accessed 14 February 2012) offers a tidy summary of the explosive expansion of this road after the board renamed the Buffalo & Washington in April 1871: "During its explosive growth by acquisition phase, the BNY&P purchased the Olean, Bradford & Warren Railroad, the McKean & Buffalo Railroad, 16,000 acres of land, and the 121 mile main line of the Western New York & Pennsylvania Railway in Pennsylvania. During 1883 the BNY&P purchased the Kendall & Eldred Railroad, The Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Western Railroad Company, The Olean and Salamanca Railroad Company, Bradford Railroad, Kinzua Railroad, Genesee Valley Canal Railroad, The Oil City and Chicago Railroad Company, and the Rochester, New York & Pennsylvania Railroad."

When the Buffalo was absorbed by the Western New York & Pennsylvania in 1887, the class retained its numbers until 1890, when they received 153-157.

The Pennsylvania Railroad gained control in 1902 and placed the 5 in its H odd class (for "odd" think "assorted"), but didn't keep them for long before selling them to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Southern Iron & Equipment. 6280 went in April 1903, 6279 in February 1905, 6281 and 6283 in May 1906, 6282 in May 1908.

SI & E sold 3 of the quintet to Virginia's South & Western Railroad. Ex-6279 took road number 35, 6281 wore 37, and 6283 was renumbered 36. The S & W was acquired by the Carolina, Clinchfield in 1908 and the trio now comprised class H-2. Clinchfield scrapped the 35 in July 1916, the 36 in October 1916, and the 37 almost a decade later in May 1925.

Ex-6280 served the Danville & Western for a few years before that Southern Railway affiliate sold it to locomotive rebuilder/reseller Georgia Car & Locomotive. GC&L found a buyer in Caryville, Florida's Henderson-Waite Lumber Company, which gave the engine road number 10.

Ex-6282 had a shorter second career after its sale to the Bentley Lumber Company of Brantley, Ala. Renamed the Ida Williams, the locomotive's later history is lost after the lumber company closed in 1913.

NB: The tube counts, diameters, and lengths are given as delivered in 1883, the heating surface area (which includes the firebox) was found in the 1943a Locomotive Diagram book.


Class 80 / H6a/H6sa (Locobase 11548)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1903, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 26, p. 37. Works numbers were 22774, 22839, 22844 in September 1903; 22923-22924, 22929-22930, 22963 in October; 23123-23124 in November. See also http://explorepahistory.com/hmarker.php?markerId=640 (last accessed 3 August 2010).

The CV was one of the oldest operating railroads in the United States when it ordered this decade of Consolidations. In 1859, the Pennsylvania bought a controlling interest in the profitable western Maryland line and from that time, the CVRR's motive power design took its cues from the much bigger road. These 2-8-0s were duplicates of the H6 engines (Locobase 4795) going into widespread service on the PRR at the same time.

When the Pennsy finally took over the CV in 1919, these locomotives were dropped into the H6 class and renumbered. Most were superheated (Locobase 5490), but all were scrapped in the late 1920s and early 1930s.


Class 92 / H-3b (Locobase 12437)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 23, p. 78. Works numbers were 18034-18035 in August 1900.

Relatively small Consolidations with wider fireboxes than heretofore and based entirely on the large class of H3a delivered to the Pennsy beginning 1890; see Locobase 2816.

The Pennsy took them over in 1903 and renumbered them twice. But the Standard Railroad of the World apparently had no interest in keeping them and scrapped them in March 1915 (3284) and December 1916 (3279).


Class GH-2/H-32 (Locobase 3177)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Works numbers were 12682-12687, 12694-12696, 12711-12717 in May 1892.

This was a subset of Pennsylvania's numerous R class of Consolidations (Locobase 1150) that was built for the quasi-independent GR&I.

Except for the 39, 42, and 44 (ex 304, 307, 309), which were retired before 1917, this class was given related ID H-33 when the GR&I's motive power was assigned Pennsylvania Railroad numbers. 09633 was cut up in 1920, the others sold for scrap between February 1923 and July 1924.


Class GH-3/H-33 (Locobase 12031)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 17, p. 262 and Volume 18, p. 166. Works number was 12682-12687, 12694-12696, 12711-12717 in May 1892 and 13232-13233 in February 1893.


Class GH4 (Locobase 11463)

Data from "Locomotive Building," The Railroad Gazette, Vol XXXVIII, No 15 (14 April 1905), p 119.

These apparently were designed to conform to Pennsylvania Railroad standards, at least as far as the Belpaire boiler was concerned. Perhaps a list of equipment suppliers may illuminate:

Westinghouse American air brakes

Pennsylvania Railroad specification axles and journal bearings

"Little Giant" bell ringers

Keasby and Mattison magnesia boiler lagging

National hollow brake beams

American Steel Foundry's brake shoes and wheel centers

Kelso couplers

Star headlights

Nathan and Sellers' injectors

United States and Jerome piston and valve rod packings

Kunnle safety valves

Leach sanding devices

Nathan sight-feed lubricators

Union Spring Company's springs

Crosby steam gages

Latrobe driving and truck wheel tires.

NB: The direct heating surface (firebox) is an estimate based on calculating the tube surface area and subtracting it from the given total evaporative heating surface.


Class GH4 / H34a (Locobase 11422)

Data from "Locomotive Building," The Railroad Gazette, Vol XLIII, No 11 (13 September 1907), p 307. Works numbers were 44852-44855 in March 1908.

See Locobase 9513 for details on this Michigan railroad's beginnings and expansion. When the GR & I bought this quartet of Consolidations, it had just seen its peak passenger volume in 1907. All were renumbered in 1910, superheated in 1915-1918 and redesignated H34s

In 1918, the Pennsylvania bought the GR & I and these engines went with the deal. They were renumbered in 1920 and served a few more years before being scrapped between April 1925 (9603) and September 1926 (9602).


Class H10s (Locobase 1035)

Similar to H-9s, but with a 1" larger piston diameter (2" larger than the H-8s) and built for Lines West. All had Belpaire fireboxes. (See Locobase 32 for a comment on the unique design of Pennsy's Belpaire firebox.) Data from Railway Age comparative table 13 May 1921.

According to the 1928 locomotive diagram offered on Robert Schoenberg's site (http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=H10s-E85283.gif&sel=ste&sz=sm&fr=, Consulted Sept 2002), however, the heating-surface areas had changed and now matched those of the H9 and H8s. This is borne out by the table from a Pennsylvania Railroad 1956 summary of locomotives.

273 built in 1913-1916 for Lines West -- 95 by ALCO-Pittsburgh, 75 by Baldwin, 73 by ALCO-Brooks, and 40 by Lima. Many H-8, H-9 converted as well.


Class H28 (Locobase 5374)

See also "Locomotive for Experiment, Pennsylvania Railroad," Railway Master Mechanic, Vol XXX, # 2 (February 1906), pp. 42-46. Works numbers were 25548 in April 1905, 25606 in May.

Bob Berkey of http://broadway.pennsyrr.com/Rail/Prr/Rosters/steam_class.html#class_j notes that Pennsy's development of large-boiler 2-8-0s followed these two.

Data from table in July 1906 AERJ. Clearly two representatives of New York Central thinking sneaking onto Pennsy property. These had the radial-stay boilers, long piston stroke, inside valves, and large grate of the NYC Consolidation.


Class H4 (2 1/4"") (Locobase 2818)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . H4 designation covers two slightly different boiler layouts -- this one with 2 1/4" flues and another of 376 tubes of 2" diameter (Locobase 2817). All of the locomotives ran on the lines west of Pittsburgh. Although

NB: The direct heating surface (including the firebox heating surface) is an estimate calculated by subtracting the calculated tube heating surface from the reported total evaporative heating surface.


Class H4 (2"") (Locobase 2817)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Baldwin works numbers were 17045-17054 in September 1899; 17847-17848, 17869, 17891 in June 1900; 17905-17906, 17952, 17965, 17985 in July; 18014-18015, 18026, 18055-18058 in August; 18089-18091 in September.

H4 designation covers two slightly different boiler layouts -- this one with 2" flues and another of fewer tubes of 2 1/4" diameter (Locobase 2818). Built for Lines West operation. The Baldwins were delivered to PRR subsidiaries Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago (21) and the the Cleveland & Pittsburgh (8).

The design also featured the increasingly common Belpaire firebox.


Class H5 - large tubes (Locobase 2819)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net and PRR 3 - 1904 109-D Class and Description of Locomotives dated 1 March 1904 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Like all other Pennsy engines of this time (and later), this class had Belpaire boilers. According to McShane (1899), preliminary tests with the H5s yielded drags of 578 tons light and 643 tons loaded. This eclipsed the Class Rs by more than 200 tons.

But they were used primarily as pushers. See http://www.northeast.railfan.net/prr_steam2.html . The 1904 109-D shows that the H5 boiler came in two version. This entry shows the 2 1/4" tube layout; see Locobase 16240 for the 2" tube boiler. Locobase hasn't been able to determine if one boiler was exchanged for another or if the class was split into two groups.


Class H5 - small tubes (Locobase 16240)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net and PRR 3 - 1904 109-D Class and Description of Locomotives dated 1 March 1904 supplied in August 2013 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection.

Like all other Pennsy engines of this time (and later), this class had Belpaire boilers. According to McShane (1899), preliminary tests with the H5s yielded drags of 578 tons light and 643 tons loaded. This eclipsed the Class Rs by more than 200 tons.

But they were used primarily as pushers. See http://www.northeast.railfan.net/prr_steam2.html . The 1904 109-D shows that the H5 boiler came in two version. This entry shows the 2" tube layout; see Locobase 2819 for the 2 1/4" tube boiler. Locobase hasn't been able to determine if one boiler was exchanged for another or if the class was split into two groups.


Class H6 (Locobase 15816)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 17, p. 262 and Volume 18, p. 166. Works numbers were 16819 -16822 in June 1899; 16868-16884, 16919-16922 in July; 18186, 18190-18193, 18225, 18226-18227, 18252-18253 in September 1900; 18273-18274, 18295, 18306, 18335-18336 in October; 18372-18373, 18403-18405 in November; 18430, 18432-18433, 18464-18465, 18489-18490, 18498-18499 in December; 18538-18539, 18557-18558, 18605-18608, 18634, 18645 in January 1900.

This was the last Consolidation narrow-firebox design delivered to the Pennsylvania. Its Belpaire firebox had a flat grate and proved difficult to fire properly. Increasing its width by 65% led to the 1901 H6a, one of the few locomotive classes to have more than 1,000 engines; see Locomotive 4795.

The H6 did not enter a superheater upgrade program. Most were retired in the mid-1920s.


Class H6a (Locobase 4795)

See Railway and Locomotive Historical Bulletin #124 for a full account of this the most numerous single class built by the Pennsy (or any other US railroad).

Richard D. Adams explains that the original H6 (Locobase 15816) had a narrow firebox that proved balky to fire properly. Pennsylvania designers and the Baldwin Works applied the wide firebox (Belpaire of course) introduced by the E1 and E2 Atlantics to the Consolidation and a star was born. Adopting the new firebox included increasing the width from 40" (1,016 mm) to 65 7/8" (1,673 mm), a 65% increase.

Adams notes that the need on the road was so great that Baldwin produced 1,017 H6a locomotives from 1902-1905.

Further development, including the introduction of larger piston valves and Walschaerts valve gear, led to the H6b, which see at Locobase 1030. 154 H6a were later superheated with larger cylinders (23" x 28") and piston valves, but retained their Stephenson motion.


Class H6b (Locobase 1030)

See Railway and Locomotive Historical Bulletin #124 for a full account of this quite numerous class. Although like its H6a predecessors in the essential dimensions of its Belpaire boiler and firebox, the H6b had 12" piston valves and introduced Walschaerts valve gear. They were never fitted with automatic stokers.

All but 38 were later superheated as H6sb with a few being fitted with 23" x 28" cylinders. In this configuration, Adams reports, "they were one of the finest freight engines that the PRR ever owned ..."

Some data from Robert Schoenberg's equipment diagram collection http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=H6b-E85285.gif&sel=all&sz=sm&fr= (Consulted September 2002)


Class H6sa/H6sb (Locobase 5490)

Data from Robert Schoenberg's equipment diagram collection http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=H6sa-E80742.gif&sel=all&sz=sm&fr= (Consulted 11 April 2003)

Of the hundreds of H6a-class Consolidations built (Locobase 4795) 156 were later superheated as H6sa. The upgrade retained the Belpaire firebox and Stephenson link motion, but rearranged the boiler innards to accommodate the large superheater flues. The refit also replaced the slide valves with 12" piston valves. See Locobase 32 for a comment on the unique design of Pennsy's Belpaire firebox.

543 H6sb (Locobase 1030) that had been built with Walschaerts gear (and 4 H6a) received identical upgrades. Some of the 6sb kept their 22"-diameter cylinders (and the 205 psi boiler pressure) while others received the 23"-diameter cylinder and slightly lower, 195-psi rating.

Many 6sb remained in service until dieselization and were fitted with power reverse. According to Richard Adams in Railway and Locomotive Historical Bulletin #124, 117 still carried on in 1947. By 1954, however, only 2 were left.


Class H8a (Locobase 1032)

Data from series of diagrams scanned by Robert Schoenberg and archived on http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=h8.gif&sel=ste&sz=sm&fr=, last accessed 5 January 2012.

Hundreds of H-8s built in several slight variations, most of which were converted to superheating, reclassified as H-8sb (Locobase 5492) or H-9s (Locobase 1034). All used the by-now trademark Belpaire fireboxes and had boilers with the highest tube count ever deployed in a Pennsy engine.

25 H-8 (242,000 lb) by Juniata in 1907

117 H-8a (235,000 lb, 14" piston valves) for Lines West 1907-1911 -- 50 Baldwin, 55 Juniata, 12 ALCO-Pittsburgh

238 H-8b (240,700 lb, 12" piston valves) -- 158 Juniata, 80 Baldwin -- and 114 H-8sb (252,500 lb) -- all Juniata-built -- for Lines East in 1908-1913

160 H-8c (239,500 lb, designed for mechanical stokers) and 32 H-8sc (249,500 lb) for Lines West in 1910-1913

-- 115 ALCO-Brooks, 25 ALCO-Pittsburgh, 20 Juniata H-8c and 32 Juniata H-8sc


Class H8sa/H8sb (Locobase 5492)

Data from Robert Schoenberg's equipment diagram collection http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html/Steam//sm_H8sb.gif (Consulted 11 April 2003)

Like the earlier H6 series, most H8's were delivered as saturated steamers -- like virtually all Pennsy engines, these had Belpaire boilers. Soon, many of them were superheated, apparently through the expedient of removing about half of the firetubes and replacing them with 5 1/2" flues. 35 H8a and 228 H8b were so converted, the H8as weighing less (219,500 lb on the drivers). Of the H8sb group, 143 were later fitted with 25" cylinders, thus being transformed into H9s.

Like the other superheated Consolidations, many of the H8 series kept working until the late 1940s.


Class H9as (Locobase 5477)

Data from Rob Schoenberg's prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html treasury consulted 9 April 2003.

Very similar to the H9s on the Pennsy, but with less superheater area. The first driving axle had a high loading compared to the other 3.

The Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad Company was formed through the consolidation of the Chicago, St Louis & Pittsburgh; the Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railway Co., the Cincinnati & Richmond Railroad Co. (No. 2), and the Jeffersonville, Madison & Indianapolis Railroad Co on June 10, 1890.

A later combination involved the Vandalia; Pittsburgh, Wheeling & Kentucky Railroad Co., the Anderson Belt Railway Co.; and Chicago, Indiana & Eastern Railway Co -- this agglomeration was confirmed on Sseptember 28, 1916.

The Pennsylvania negotiated a 999-year lease of the line on March 26, 1921.


Class H9cs (Locobase 5482)

Data from Rob Schoenberg's prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html treasury consulted 9 April 2003. The full name of this Pennsy subsidiary was Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad Company as of 1916, when it also incorporated the Vandalia and several others. The PRR leased the line for 999 years in 1921.

Rebuilds similar to the Pennsy's H9s, but with smaller superheaters. For some reason, these 11 did not have arch tubes. Berkey (http://broadway.pennsyrr.com/Rail/Prr/Rosters/steam_class.html#class_l -- 1 Feb 2004), says three were later converted to H-10s by installing 26" x 28" cylinders.


Class H9s (Locobase 1034)

Similar to H-8, but with a 1-in larger piston diameter; all had Belpaire firebox. See Locobase 32 for a comment on the unique design of Pennsy's Belpaire firebox.

274 built in 1913-1914 for Lines East -- 194 by Baldwin, 80 by Juniata. 279 H-8, H-8sb converted to H-9s as well.

18 H-9sa (237,200 lb) converted.

11 H-9sc (240,945 lb)

Data for the heating surfaces come from the Pennsylvania's 1956 summary of locomotives, as confirmed by several diagrams from Rob Schoenberg's PRR website.-- http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=H9s-45442_2.gif&sel=ste&sz=sm&fr= (visited 11 June 2004).

There are other figures, however. One of Schoenberg's scans was:

Class: H9s - 2-8-0 Steam Loco

Tracing#: 45442(B) (Other revisions available: (none) - 45442(A) - E45442 - E428887)

Although all the basic data seems the same (number of tubes & flues and their length, e.g.) as other diagrams and the numbers shown in the 1956 summary. But the superheater is credited with 782 sq ft, while the firebox area is 190 sq ft.

The 45442(A) drawing shows yet a different set of areas:

187 sq ft in the firebox, 1173.9 sq ft of superheater. Were these both experiments?


Class I/H1 (Locobase 1141)

Most of the data comes from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Class data from Bob Berkey's The Broad Way website. http://broadway.pennsyrr.com/Rail/Prr/Rosters/steam_class.html#class_j (visited 16 Feb 2003). See also Baldwin Locomotive Works, International Exhibition 1876, Exhibit of Locomotives by Burnham Parry Williams & Co (Philadelphia: J P Lippincott & Co, 1876), pp. 14-16.

One of the classes established by Alexander J. Cassatt in 1867 when he became Master of Machinery. In fact, it is this class that is credited with re-invigorating the 2-8-0 layout after a very slow acceptance rate following its introduction on the Lehigh Valley (Locobase ).

John White (1968) reported that after its 1876 adoption, the new I class regularly moved trains of 80-90 cars at 14 mph (22.5 km/h).

As with the Lehigh Valley exhibition piece described in Locobase 11179, an example of this locomotive displayed at the 1876 International Exhibition at Philadelphia (often known as the Centennial Exposition) listed many of the suppliers of components for the engine:

Boiler, Bay State Iron Co.'s Homogeneous Cast Steel [Boston, Mass];

Fire-Box, Singer, Nimick & Co.'s Homogeneous Cast Steel [Pittsburgh, Pa];

Tires, Standard Steel Works' Crucible Cast Steel [Philadelphia, Pa];

Truck-Wheels, A. Whitney & Sons' Double-plate Chilled Wheels [Philadelphia, Pa];

Flues, Morris, Tasker & Co.'s Lap-welded Charcoal Iron Boiler-Tubes [Philadelphia, Pa];

Injector, William Sellers & Co.[Philadelphia, Pa];

Steam-Gauge, H. Belfield & Co.[Philadelphia, Pa];

Headlight, Pennsylvania Railroad Co.;

Brass and Copper Piping, American Tube Works [Boston, Mass] ;

Jacket Iron, W. D. Wood & Co.'s Patent Planished Sheet Iron [Pittsburgh, Pa].

A chronology of 1875 events put up in February 2006 -- http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:IOfRgoFtrK0J:www.prrths.com/Hagley/PRR1875%2520Feb%252006.pdf+pennsylvania+railroad+H1&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=9&client=safari, accessed 2 June 2006, notes that the type were also called "Modocs" after the Modoc Indians for their hauling power. They had a steel boiler barrel and "....firebox sloping to the rear with the space between the roof sheet and crown sheet filled with water, called the "Altoona boiler"; possibly influenced by Isaac Dripps's firebox on Camden & Amboy Crampton locomotives in late 1840s; "Altoona boiler" possibly influences Collin's adoption of Belpaire firebox 10 years later. (RyW, Warner, PRRTHS)"

Richard Adams's article on the Belpaire boiler on the Pennsylvania, hosted on the http://www.prrths.com/PRR_Belpaire.html, last accessed 2 June 2006, gives more detail on the "sloping firebox": "...top front of the firebox was 9 1/2" lower than the top of the boiler barrel and the sloped steeply to the rear. The space between the roof sheet and the crown sheet, which were flat and had the same slope, was filled with water. This type of construction became so closely identified with the PRR that is was officially known as the "Altoona Boiler". Its mechanical appeal was that it had the roof and crown sheets on the same plane, which meant they could be tied together effectively with stay bolts."

Adams comments on the limitations of the design as well: "Although experts claimed the sloping firebox had superior steaming qualities, there was a problem of fluctuating water levels in the sight glass while the engine was being worked. The reduction in water space made it difficult to carry water at the proper level. Generally, engineers carried their water higher than necessary. Despite problems, the boiler and sloping firebox remained on PRR freight locomotives until 1885."

57 of this class were later converted to Class B5 0-6-0s. See also Locobase 2453 for the Frisco entry covering some pass-alongs.


Class R/H3 (Locobase 1150)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Replaced I class (Locobase 1141). Freight traffic or heavy freight trains. Also represented the first use of a Belpaire boiler on a Pennsy locomotive. Tonnage rating on the Pittsburgh division was 350 tons light, 383 tons loaded.

Many were upgraded to H3a; see Locobase 2816.


Class R/H3a, 3b, 3c (Locobase 2816)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . Later R class (see Locobase 1150 for the earlier Rs). Although given the same class ID, the later engines had smaller boiler, longer boiler tubes, more weight on the drivers; all had Belpaire fireboxes. Note on the diagram notes that this is the R class "built after 12/31/89." Building dates (1890-1893) confirmed by Class data from Bob Berkey's The Broad Way website. http://broadway.pennsyrr.com/Rail/Prr/Rosters/steam_class.html#class_j (visited 16 Feb 2003).

329 H3a, 143 H3b were built new. Also, many H3 (1150) were converted to H3a.


Class S/H2 (Locobase 1151)

Data from diagram scanned in by Robert Schoenberg of http://prr.railfan.net . http://www.northeast.railfan.net/prr_steam2.html

Replaced I class. Virtually identical to R, but lower axle load. Note the high boiler demand factor. 105 additional engines were delivered as H2a.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class1 / 3685110163/H odd169/H odd175
Locobase ID12028 8458 11648 16215 11994
RailroadCornwall & Lebanon (PRR)Western New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)Western New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)Western New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)Western New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class22671
Road Numbers1-2 / 3865-3866110-111/158-159/6284-6285163-168/6289-6294169-174, 175/6295-6301175
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built22661
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18921889189018911891
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14'14'14'14'14'
Engine Wheelbase22.50'21.08'21.08'21.75'21.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.62 0.66 0.66 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)44.75'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers135000 lbs104000 lbs108000 lbs108000 lbs
Engine Weight150000 lbs128250 lbs118000 lbs122000 lbs122000 lbs
Tender Light Weight67000 lbs67000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight195250 lbs185000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3600 gals3200 gals3200 gals3300 gals3300 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)15 tons tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)56 lb/yard043 lb/yard45 lb/yard45 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter50"50"50.25"50.25"50.25"
Boiler Pressure175 psi150 psi150 psi160 psi175 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)14" x 28"20" x 24"19" x 24"19" x 26"13" x 26"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)24" x 28" (2)21" x 26" (2)
Tractive Effort24363 lbs24480 lbs21983 lbs25403 lbs18807 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.54 4.73 4.25 5.74
Heating Ability
Firebox Area172.70 sq. ft159.60 sq. ft152 sq. ft139 sq. ft139 sq. ft
Grate Area35.30 sq. ft23.80 sq. ft23.50 sq. ft29.30 sq. ft29.30 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2311 sq. ft2018 sq. ft1890 sq. ft1897 sq. ft1897 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2311 sq. ft2018 sq. ft1890 sq. ft1897 sq. ft1897 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume463.24231.25239.98222.34474.93
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation61783570352546885128
Same as above plus superheater percentage61783570352546885128
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3022323940228002224024325
Power L131584034422740713645
Power MT206.29358.42332.41297.62

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class176/H odd2 / H37 / H odd3980 / H6a/H6sa
Locobase ID6631 12424 12017 9155 11548
RailroadWestern New York & Pennsylvania (PRR)Cornwall & Lebanon (PRR)Pennsylvania & Northwestern (PRR)Buffalo, New York & Philadelphia (PRR)Cumberland Valley (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class4110510
Road Numbers176-179/6302-63052 / 368637-46 / 6628-663739-42, 49/153-157/6279-628380-89 / 3813-3822
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built4110510
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18991900189218831903
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase14.92'14'13.67'14'16.54'
Engine Wheelbase22.33'22.50'21.58'21.67'24.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.67 0.62 0.63 0.65 0.67
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)48.83'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers126000 lbs135000 lbs91000 lbs160000 lbs
Engine Weight140000 lbs150000 lbs116000 lbs116000 lbs180000 lbs
Tender Light Weight84000 lbs56000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight224000 lbs172000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity4000 gals4000 gals3000 gals7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons tons tons tons tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)53 lb/yard56 lb/yard038 lb/yard67 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter51.25"50"50"50"56"
Boiler Pressure190 psi200 psi175 psi130 psi205 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)19.5" x 26"14" x 28"13" x 24"20" x 24"22" x 28"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke)24" x 28" (2)22" x 24" (2)
Tractive Effort31155 lbs27844 lbs17887 lbs21216 lbs42169 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.04 4.85 4.29 3.79
Heating Ability
Firebox Area168.80 sq. ft172.70 sq. ft142.40 sq. ft167 sq. ft
Grate Area30.20 sq. ft35.30 sq. ft24.90 sq. ft30 sq. ft49 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2007 sq. ft2311 sq. ft1726 sq. ft1404 sq. ft2844 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface2007 sq. ft2311 sq. ft1726 sq. ft1404 sq. ft2844 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume223.32463.24468.13160.89230.86
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation573870604358390010045
Same as above plus superheater percentage573870604358390010045
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area320723454024920034235
Power L151483609336705714
Power MT360.30235.750314.93

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class92 / H-3bGH-2/H-32GH-3/H-33GH4GH4 / H34a
Locobase ID12437 3177 12031 11463 11422
RailroadAllegheny Valley (PRR)Grand Rapids & Indiana (PRR)Grand Rapids & Indiana (PRR)Grand Rapids & Indiana (PRR)Grand Rapids & Indiana (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class21015104
Road Numbers92-93 / 6478, 6483 / 3279, 328457-66/9581-9590304-321/241, 243, 245, 46-56/9570-958032-35 / 78-81 / 9602-9605
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built21015104
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoAltoonaBurnham, Williams & CoAlcoAlco-Pittsburgh
Year19001896189219051908
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13.83'13.67'13.67'
Engine Wheelbase21.75'21.50'21.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)49.75'49.45'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)30950 lbs32100 lbs
Weight on Drivers112610 lbs101500 lbs98000 lbs155000 lbs152000 lbs
Engine Weight128740 lbs129900 lbs110000 lbs175000 lbs178000 lbs
Tender Light Weight63700 lbs63800 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight192440 lbs193700 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3600 gals3600 gals3600 gals6000 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)7.5 tons tons12 tons12 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)47 lb/yard42 lb/yard41 lb/yard65 lb/yard63 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter50"50"50"56"56"
Boiler Pressure160 psi165 psi160 psi200 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 24"20" x 24"20" x 24"22" x 28"21" x 28"
Tractive Effort26112 lbs26928 lbs26112 lbs41140 lbs37485 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.31 3.77 3.75 3.77 4.05
Heating Ability
Firebox Area140.30 sq. ft166.80 sq. ft126.45 sq. ft150 sq. ft146 sq. ft
Grate Area31.50 sq. ft31.10 sq. ft23.90 sq. ft45 sq. ft44.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1498 sq. ft1731 sq. ft1442 sq. ft2600 sq. ft2530 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1498 sq. ft1731 sq. ft1442 sq. ft2600 sq. ft2530 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume171.66198.36165.24211.05225.40
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation50405132382490008900
Same as above plus superheater percentage50405132382490008900
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area2244827522202323000029200
Power L133614042316950765421
Power MT263.20351.18285.16288.79314.51

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH10sH28H4 (2 1/4"")H4 (2"")H5 - large tubes
Locobase ID1035 5374 2818 2817 2819
RailroadPennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class273210515
Road Numbers70012762, 7748
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built273210515
BuilderSeveralAlcoseveralseveralJuniata
Year19131905190018971898
Valve GearWalschaertStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase17.04'17.50'16.92'16.92'17.50'
Engine Wheelbase25.80'26.42'25.42'25.42'25.97'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.66 0.66 0.67 0.67 0.67
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)62.44'60.31'54.75'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)60000 lbs40100 lbs41000 lbs48000 lbs
Weight on Drivers226900 lbs198000 lbs156100 lbs156100 lbs175700 lbs
Engine Weight249500 lbs220000 lbs174300 lbs174300 lbs196500 lbs
Tender Light Weight181500 lbs140500 lbs104600 lbs104600 lbs112000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight431000 lbs360500 lbs278900 lbs278900 lbs308500 lbs
Tender Water Capacity8100 gals7000 gals6000 gals6000 gals6000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)17.1 tons13.5 tons11 tons11 tons11 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)95 lb/yard83 lb/yard65 lb/yard65 lb/yard73 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"63"56"56"56"
Boiler Pressure205 psi200 psi185 psi185 psi185 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)26" x 28"23" x 32"22" x 28"22" x 28"23.5" x 28"
Tractive Effort53197 lbs45679 lbs38055 lbs38055 lbs43421 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.27 4.33 4.10 4.10 4.05
Heating Ability
Firebox Area175 sq. ft177.10 sq. ft154 sq. ft154 sq. ft197 sq. ft
Grate Area55 sq. ft55.40 sq. ft29.70 sq. ft29.70 sq. ft33.33 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface3016 sq. ft3774 sq. ft2322 sq. ft2470 sq. ft2721 sq. ft
Superheating Surface623 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3639 sq. ft3774 sq. ft2322 sq. ft2470 sq. ft2721 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume175.29245.26188.49200.50193.58
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1127511080549554956166
Same as above plus superheater percentage1319211080549554956166
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area4197435420284902849036445
Power L1116946359433445414552
Power MT454.49283.22244.84256.53228.47

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH5 - small tubesH6H6aH6bH6sa/H6sb
Locobase ID16240 15816 4795 1030 5490
RailroadPennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class15651041601699
Road Numbers1804-1828, 1850-1889189017011890
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built651041601
BuilderAltoonaBurnham, Williams & CoSeveralSeveralSeveral
Year18981899190119061912
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase17.50'16.54'16.50'16.50'16.54'
Engine Wheelbase25.97'24.75'24.75'24.75'24.75'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.67
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)54.75'57.98'58.12'57.98'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)48000 lbs46000 lbs45400 lbs
Weight on Drivers175700 lbs160000 lbs175700 lbs178700 lbs177900 lbs
Engine Weight196500 lbs180000 lbs194500 lbs200700 lbs198600 lbs
Tender Light Weight112000 lbs112000 lbs138800 lbs138800 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight308500 lbs292000 lbs333300 lbs337400 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals6000 gals7200 gals7200 gals7200 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)11 tons11 tons14 tons14 tons14.1 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)73 lb/yard67 lb/yard73 lb/yard74 lb/yard74 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter56"56"56"56"56"
Boiler Pressure185 psi185 psi205 psi205 psi195 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)23.5" x 28"22" x 28"22" x 28"22" x 28"23" x 28"
Tractive Effort43421 lbs38055 lbs42169 lbs42169 lbs43841 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.05 4.20 4.17 4.24 4.06
Heating Ability
Firebox Area197 sq. ft180 sq. ft189 sq. ft167 sq. ft188 sq. ft
Grate Area33.33 sq. ft33.33 sq. ft49 sq. ft49 sq. ft49 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface2902 sq. ft2813 sq. ft2878 sq. ft2844 sq. ft2234 sq. ft
Superheating Surface429 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface2902 sq. ft2813 sq. ft2878 sq. ft2844 sq. ft2663 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume206.46228.34233.62230.86165.92
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6166616610045100459555
Same as above plus superheater percentage61666166100451004511084
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3644533300387453423542526
Power L147755204593857149509
Power MT239.66286.82298.03281.97471.36

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH8aH8sa/H8sbH9asH9csH9s
Locobase ID1032 5492 5477 5482 1034
RailroadPennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis (PRR)Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class5402631811274
Road Numbers170117018825-88318817-882440347
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built5401811274
BuilderSeveralSeveralPittsburghPittsburghSeveral
Year191019121913
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertStephensonStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase17.04'17.12'17.04'17.04'17.04'
Engine Wheelbase25.60'25.79'25.79'25.79'25.80'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.67 0.66 0.66 0.66 0.66
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)59.35'62.40'59.45'59.45'62.49'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)61000 lbs62575 lbs57800 lbs62300 lbs
Weight on Drivers216450 lbs225000 lbs210575 lbs216450 lbs220000 lbs
Engine Weight240945 lbs252500 lbs237200 lbs240945 lbs250000 lbs
Tender Light Weight159000 lbs156000 lbs156800 lbs139000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight411500 lbs393200 lbs397745 lbs389000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity7000 gals7000 gals7800 gals7000 gals9000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)13.5 tons12.5 tons16.3 tons13 tons13 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)90 lb/yard94 lb/yard88 lb/yard90 lb/yard92 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter62"62"62"62"62"
Boiler Pressure205 psi205 psi205 psi205 psi205 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)24" x 28"24" x 28"25" x 28"25" x 28"25" x 28"
Tractive Effort45327 lbs45327 lbs49183 lbs49183 lbs49183 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.78 4.96 4.28 4.40 4.47
Heating Ability
Firebox Area192 sq. ft211 sq. ft217.40 sq. ft187 sq. ft190 sq. ft
Grate Area55 sq. ft55 sq. ft55.19 sq. ft55.19 sq. ft55.13 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface3844 sq. ft3070 sq. ft3059 sq. ft3028 sq. ft3070 sq. ft
Superheating Surface613 sq. ft620 sq. ft620 sq. ft613 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3844 sq. ft3683 sq. ft3679 sq. ft3648 sq. ft3683 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume262.20209.40192.29190.35192.99
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1127511275113141131411302
Same as above plus superheater percentage1127513192132371323713223
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area3936050608521434485245572
Power L1694113932129511270812700
Power MT282.79546.04542.36517.74509.07

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassI/H1R/H3R/H3a, 3b, 3cS/H2
Locobase ID1141 1150 2816 1151
RailroadPennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)Pennsylvania (PRR)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class545418105
Road Numbers
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built545418472105
BuilderAltoonaAltoonaAltoona
Year1875188518901888
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13.67'13.83'13.83'13.65'
Engine Wheelbase21.50'21.75'21'21.50'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.64 0.66 0.63
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)47.60'48.83'49.75'47.70'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)23300 lbs26750 lbs30950 lbs26760 lbs
Weight on Drivers82700 lbs100600 lbs112610 lbs96500 lbs
Engine Weight95700 lbs114625 lbs128740 lbs108550 lbs
Tender Light Weight57800 lbs63800 lbs80000 lbs69800 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight153500 lbs178425 lbs208740 lbs178350 lbs
Tender Water Capacity3000 gals3000 gals3600 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)6 tons tons7.5 tons7.5 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated)34 lb/yard42 lb/yard47 lb/yard40 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter50"50"50"50"
Boiler Pressure125 psi140 psi150 psi140 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)20" x 24"20" x 24"20" x 24"20" x 24"
Tractive Effort20400 lbs22848 lbs24480 lbs22848 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.05 4.40 4.60 4.22
Heating Ability
Firebox Area92 sq. ft166.80 sq. ft140.30 sq. ft113.52 sq. ft
Grate Area23 sq. ft31.10 sq. ft31.50 sq. ft22.75 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface1258 sq. ft1731 sq. ft1498 sq. ft1260 sq. ft
Superheating Surface
Combined Heating Surface1258 sq. ft1731 sq. ft1498 sq. ft1260 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume144.16198.36171.66144.39
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation2875435447253185
Same as above plus superheater percentage2875435447253185
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area11500233522104515893
Power L12051342931512443
Power MT218.70300.58246.75223.25

Reference


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