Baltimore & Ohio / Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern / Buffalo & Susquehanna / Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh / Chicago & Alton / Chicago Terminal Transfer / Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton / Cincinnati, Indianapolis, & Western / Coal & Coke / Indian Creek Valley / Morgantown & Kingwood / Pittsburgh & Western / Pittsburgh Junction / Roaring Creek & Belington / Staten Island Rapid Transit 2-8-0 "Consolidation" Locomotives in the USA


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 105 / E-28a (Locobase 2095)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 23, p. 220. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Baltimore & Ohio Chicago Terminal Railroad came into B&O possession in January 1910 after the CT had gone into receivership.

They were converted to 0-8-0 switchers between 1929 and 1933 and their numbers changed. In switcher service they lasted until 1959.


Class 11/E-32 (Locobase 2101)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 27, p. 27; and See also the online West Virginia Encyclopedia entry on the Coal & Coke by Donald L Rice at [] . Works numbers were 24114-24115 in February 1904 and 25098-25099 in February 1905.

Low-drivered Consolidation class one would expect to see on a coal road buried in the West Virginia hills. The WV encyclopedia entry explains that the C&C combined some existing trackage with 107 new miles that opened in 1905.

Rice summarizes what this new railroad meant to the surrounding towns: "When the Coal & Coke Railway was completed, it provided a much needed north-south route through the heart of West Virginia. The Coal & Coke connected with the Western Maryland Railroad at Elkins and with the Kanawha & Michigan at Charleston. The Coal & Coke Railway provided a way for West Virginia coal to get to outlets on the Great Lakes, as well as an alternate route to Atlantic Ocean ports."

The Coal & Coke Railroad was bought by the B&O in 1917, operated by the B&O from 1920 to 1933, when it was absorbed into the B&O system.

A later diagram reflected a reduction in the firebox heating surface to 140.1 sq ft (13.02 sq m), which reduced evaporative heating surface to 1,988 sq ft (184.69 sq m).

This engine class was out of service by 1939.


Class 19/E-33 (Locobase 2102)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and B & O to 1954 Assorted Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 28, p. 225. Works numbers were 27316, 27330 in January 1906; 27720, 27723, 27774 in March; and

28126-28128, 28251-28252 in May.

A dozen Consolidations set the C&C's 2-8-0 tractive power at 42,900 lb each; later locomotives (70-75) shown in Locobases 13905 and 6700 had substantially larger fireboxes and grates and a few more boiler tubes. Compared to those engines, this design's front truck swung a generous 7" (179 mm) to either side.

After the B&O acquired the C&C in 1918, these engines were renumbered 2934-2945 and lasted until 1950.


Class 3 /E-46 (Locobase 13798)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Volume 39, p. 7. See also "'Movies' to Boost a Railroad," Industrial World, Volume 47, No 2 (18 August 1913), p. 976. Works number was 36669 in July 1911,

The ICV began as a Fayette County, Pennsylvania logging road and this little Consolidation would seem to fit that bill. Over time, the ICV's exploitation of the Indian Valley coal seam and its connection with the B & O at Indian Creek gained more of its attention. In 1913, according to the Industrial World reported, "The enterprising men at the head of the little road, which has grown from a logging enterprise into a well managed railroad property with substantial roadbed and standard motive power and rolling stock, are seeking in every possible way to popularize their line for summer resort travel and also to attract investors into the romantic reaches of the Laurel Ridge."

How? "Recently they hit upon the moving picture idea, and had a series of moving pictures placed in the hands of the Western Pennsylvania circuit."

In other words, commercials for the ICV were interspersed among the 2-reelers at the local bijous. The ICV soon gained the notice of other railroads: "Austin Gallagher, industrial commissioner of the Western Maryland, dropped into a moving picture house at Connellsville the other night and got a glimpse of the Indian Creek screens, which happened to be on the bill that night."

The IW allows the the Connellsville Courier to relate the result:

"The idea struck Mr. Gallagher forcibly as the views along the Indian Creek Valley Railroad were shown. The industrial commissioner was keenly disappointed that more of the pictures were not shown and regretted that he could not remain for another evening to get a glimpse of a further installment.

"'I believe this would be just the thing to advertise our route,' said Mr. Gallagher. Mr. Gallagher said he would suggest that the passenger department communicate with the men who took the Indian Creek views, and have them take the Western Maryland pictures."

The IW assessed the initiative in another perspective, saying it all "...goes to show that in rai1roading, as in other lines, the big fellows haven't a corner on all the bright ideas."

Chartered in 1902 to link Indian Creek to Rockwood, Pa some 55 miles away, the ICV never achieved that ambition; in 1920, the railroad had reached Jones Mill, which lay 23 miles from Indian Creek on the Youghiogheny River. The B & O took over the road in 1928, renumbered the 3 as 440 and placed it in its own E-46 class. The 440 was scrapped in 1934.


Class 3/E-37 (Locobase 2107)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and B & O to 1954 Assorted Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 29, p. 58. Works number was 27897 in April 1906.

Morgantown & Kingwood Railroad had 18 miles (29 KM) of hills south of Morgantown in West Virginia. The B&O bought it in February 1920 and erased the name in 1922. This low-drivered Consolidation was renumbered 413, later 588, and ran until 1946.


Class 5/13/E-33 (Locobase 16198)

See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 26, p. 149. See also the entry on the Coal & Coke Railway on "Abandoned: the Story of a Forgotten America" at http://abandonedonline.net/locations/railroads/coal-and-coke-railway/, last accessed 3 June 2016. Works numbers were 23169 and 23179 in November 1903.

Former West Virginia senator Henry Gassaway Davis founded the Coal & Coke Railway in 1902 to connect the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad and the Kanawha and Michigan Railway at Charleston to the West Virginia Central & Pittsburg Railway (WVC&P) near Elkins. His goal was to exploit large coal seams and virgin pine forests.

The RC&B was one of Davis's short lines (once he sold the WVC&P in 1902) and he ordered two new Consolidations to operate on the 12 mile road. None of the usual sources credit the RC&B with this purchase and the Baldwin specs show that the tenders were lettered for the Coal & Coke, but Gene Connelly's rosters insist on the RC&B.

The RC&B grew through a merger with the bankrupt Roaring Creek & Charleston and reached 17.8 miles. Although the corporate union of the RC&B and the C&C didn't occur until 1919, operations were unified by 1905 and the 5 and 6 received C&C numbers 13 and 14.

As Consolidations, this middle-sized pair shared its dimensions with small studs in several other parts of the country. They had long working lives on the C&C and later on the B&O before being sold in March 1946 to the Interstate Railroad.


Class 70/E-34 (Locobase 13905)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volumes 41, p.101 and Volume 48, p. 230. Works numbers were 38178-38179 in August 1912, 40669-40670 in September 1913

These Coal & Coke Consolidations followed the same power dimensions as the earlier batches (Locobase 2102), but had a few more fire tubes and quite a bit more grate area. They also abandoned the inside Stephenson gear for the outside Baker radial gear.

The second pair introduced significant changes in the swing-bolster truck. Wheel diameter dropped 2" to 28", the swing bolster now had a center bearing, and the swing to either side increased from 2" (50.8 mm) to 4 3/4" (121 mm). They also changed the supplier of the two 3" (76.2 mm) safety valves to Coale

Two years later, Baldwin added two more that had a little less heating surface area; see Locobase 6700.

2946 was retired in March 1939. The other three continued in service all through World War II. Retirements then came to 2948 in May 1947 and 2947, 2949 in June 1949.


Class 74/E-35 (Locobase 6700)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and B & O to 1954 Assorted Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 50, pp. 180+. Works numbers were 41414-41415 in May 1914.

These Consolidations were virtually identical to the four supplied to the C&C in 1912-1913 (Locobase 13905). The pair faced the same operating environment in which the sharpest main line curves were 16 degrees, the tightest branch-line curves were a tight 32 degrees. Grades rose at a relatively modest 86 feet to the mile (1.6%).

Compared to the 70 class, this pair's spec changes included greater firebox heating surface area owing to a 6 1/2" (165 mm) deeper firebox; front sheet height increased to 78 1/2" (1,994 mm), rear sheet lengthened to 70 1/2"(1,778 mm). The modified swing bolster truck introduced in 72-73 also appeared in this pair.

The B&O's diagram showed a 30 sq ft (2.79 sq m) decrease in firebox heating surface area to 155 sq ft (14.12 sq m), which dropped the evaporative heating surface area to 2,662 sq ft (247.4 sq m).

2950 was retired first in September 1939. 2951 operated throughout World War II before being scrapped in November 1948.


Class 8/E-40 (Locobase 2110)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964). and data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005. See also DeGolyer, Volume 30, pp. 102-103, 191 and Volume 45, p. 271. Works numbers were 30086 in February 1907; 30667 in April; 32128, 32153 in November; 33679 in August 1909, 33734 in September..

The heart of the M&K Railroad Consolidation roster in 1920; these were substantially bigger and more powerful than the 3 shown in Locobase 2107. Ruling grades on this short line were pitched at 2 1/2% and curve radii reached 18 deg on the main line and 21 deg on the Y-track.

Specifications for the second pair, Locobase surmises, a focus on maintainability and sought more insensivity to changes in clearances due to use and wear. M&K requested that the firebox width be reduced by 2" while keeping the water space the same. This modification yielded 1" (25.4 mm) increases in clearances between firebox and the back driving wheels on each side. Another tweak required the driver journals to be 3/16" (1.9 mm) longer than the axle boxes, "so, when being worn, bearings will not come in contact with inside shoulder of journal." This apparently was related to the provision for 1/4" (6.35 mm) lateral motion on each side between the driving wheel and the axle box. See also the detailed spec on pilot construction to allow the railroad to adapt easily to the engine's settling in service.

All springs were supplied by Pittsburgh Spring & Steel Company.

Renumbered 417-422 and retired by 1947 (first 4), 1938 (last 2).


Class 80E-36 (Locobase 2104)

Data from Record of Recent Construction #98 (Baldwin Locomotive Works, 1920), p. 3-4 and Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 53, pp. 383+. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964). Works numbers were 43564-43565 in June 1916.

Slightly enlarged versions of earlier Baldwin-built Consolidations delivered to the Coal & Coke Railroad. Photograph shows a stocky profile with 11" (279 mm) piston valves, small domes. The C&C's profile had a relatively modest maximum grade of 86 feet/mile (1.6%).

These two engines were renumbered 2952-2953 when the B & O bought out the C & C in 1918.

2953 was retired before World War II (June 1940) while 2952 served until December 1949.


Class Class C (Locobase 2030)

Data from Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964). Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 934-937 in October 1887.

Small Pittsburgh and Western standard-gauge Consolidation. B&O Class E odd, 350-351.

According to Rumary, 62-63 went to the Baltimore & Ohio as the 351 and 353. 86 wound up on the Ursina & North Fork in Pennsylvania.


Class Class E/E-26 (Locobase 2022)

Data from "Heavy Consolidation for Pittsburgh Junction Railroad," Railway and Locomotive Engineering, Volume VIII, No 5 (May 1895). p. 288. See also Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details.Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Rumary credits eight with 21x28" cylinders, but given the consecutive works numbering, it's more likely that the two had the same power dimensions. Works numbers were 1545-1546 in March 1895.

Very low-drivered Consolidation originally delivered to the PJ short line. Its large boiler and cab visually overpower the small drivers in a Smithsonian Institution photograph. The R&LE report states that the design was "a very symmetrical one in outline, with no 'notions' about her; she is as near as possible a standard 'Pittsburgh'". If "standard" includes the small clerestory over the cab, then Locobase can't disagree.

Renumbered and reclassified as E-26 in 1902 by the B&O.


Class Class H (Locobase 2031)

Pittsburgh and Western standard-gauge Consolidations built in at least two batches and probably totalled more than 9. B&O Class E-20, 1759, 1760-1761, 1763, 1765.

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 1571-1572 (August 1895), 1715 (June 1897), 1836, 1838 (July 1898).

Three -- 63, 67, and 88 -- were classed E-20a, 1756, 1762, 1764 and used 21x28" cylinders. The works numbers were 1545 (March 1895), and 1835, 1837 (July 1898), which shows that they were produced at the same time as the others.


Class Class H-1 /E-22 (Locobase 2032)

These standard-gauge Consolidations were repeats of the 1899 batches, but weighed about 2 tons more. B&O numbers were 1950-1954.

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 2205-2209 (February 1901).


Class Class H-3 (Locobase 2033)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).

Builder information from B Rumary list supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers were 2112-2113 (June-July 1900).

Standard-gauge Consolidations built as compounds with 23" HP and 35" LP cylinders; later modified as simple-expansion locomotives as shown in the specifications. B&O Class E-21b, 1941-1942.


Class E (Locobase 1443)

The SIRT's most powerful locomotive, this Wooten-boilered "brute" operated on the SIRT until 1945. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964).


Class E / E-30 (Locobase 6565)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005. Works numbers were 25531-25532, 25555, 25576, 25585-25586 in April 1905; 25626, 25641-25642, 25656-25657, 25663, 25681-25682, 25693 in May.

This class had an unusual diameter/stroke ratio in its cylinders. For some reason, the CH & D wanted small-bore. Perhaps the relatively small volume was a reason for the relatively early retirement dates. The B & O withdrew 1732-1733 in 1929 while the rest didn't go until 1933.


Class E-11a (Locobase 5871)

Summarized in a description of several locomotive classes recently delivered to the Baltimore & Ohio in American Engineer, Car Builder and Railroad Journal (AERJ) in 1895.

This was the larger of two Consolidation designs delivered at the same time, according to AERJ.

According to a compilation of Cooke locomotives by B.Rumary (25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND) and supplied to Locobase by Allen Stanley in March 2004, works numbers were 2345-2354 (August 1898).


Class E-14 (Locobase 3147)

Data from McShane (1899) and showing an engine that was probably a follow-on class to those described in Locobase 5872. See also DeGolyer, Volume 21, pp. 85 and 169

15345-15350, 15353-15357, 15359-15367 in June 1897; 15665-15669, 15674-15678 in January 1898; 15735-15744 in February; and 16140-16154 in August.

Heavy freight engine of the 1890s.

Most of the class began and ended their 30-year careers on the B & O and were retired in the 1920s. For some reason, 1294 lingered long enough to be leased in 1942 to the Strouds Creek & Muddlety; the West Virginia shortline struck out from the B & O at Allingdale, WVa and traveled its 5.7 miles up and over a divide to Tioga in Nicholas County. After its return, the engine was retired in December 1951.

Two other E-14s -- 1527 and 1529 -- were sold to the Buffalo Creek & Gauley in 1925 and April 1946 as the BC & G's 6 and 7. Both were retired 1953. The BC & G website -- [] -- notes that the 1526 was on the BC & G's roster in 1944 and speculates that it may have been leased for a time but never actually purchased or renumbered.


Class E-16 (Locobase 12591)

Data from "The Year in Locomotive Construction", Daily Railway Age (14 June 1899), pp. 9-16 , esp. p.12-13. Works numbers were 1863-1871 in October 1898; 1872 in November; 1886; 1887-1892 in December; 1893-1904 in January 1899; 1905-1916 in February; 1917-1925 in March; 1926-1932 in April; 1933-1935 in May

Very similar to the Baldwin Consolidations that immediately preceded the class, this much larger order was fulfilled by Pittsburgh over a two-year period.

NB: Tube length is an estimate based on the calculation of tube surface area by subtracting reported firebox heating surface from reported total evaporative heating surface


Class E-17 / E-17a (Locobase 6563)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005 and from DeGolyer, Volume 21, p. 271.. Works numbers were 16191-16195 in September 1898.

The class was later rebuilt with 21"-diameter cylinders and about 6 sq ft more direct heating surface. They were nearly repeats of the 1896 E-13s (1630-1639), but had slightly longer, but slightly shallower fireboxes.

1642 retired in 1923, 1641 and 1644 in 1925, 1643 in 1926, and 1640 in November 1928.


Class E-18 (Locobase 3928)

Railroad Gazette (15 June 1900) profiles this large class, which was intended to be a good deal larger. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 250-251. Works numbers ran as follows: 17406-17407 in January 1900; 17437-17438, 17496-17497 in February; 17527-17530, 17575-17577 in March; 17642-17643, 17671-17678, 17697, 17711-17713 in April; 17733-17736, 17769-17770 in May; and 17816-17817, 17851-17852, 17867-17868 in June.

RG notes that the original plan was to build to the same design 165 engines for the Baltimore & Ohio, 60 for the Union Pacific, and 10 more for the Kansas City, Pittsburgh & Gulf. But along the way 24 of the B&O order received Wootten wide-firebox boilers in a camelback arrangement. Within a year, according to Drury (1993), that layout accounted for a total of 111 locomotives. Two more E-18s were delivered with Vanderbilt boilers with a corrugated, cylindrical firebox. (These were E-19s 1939-1940).

The 39 shown here were delivered as Vauclain balanced compound conventional-cab Consolidations and operated for years, the last being retired in 1936.


Class E-19 (Locobase 4142)

Data from "The Vanderbilt Boiler,", Railroad Gazette, Volume XXXIII, No 19 (10 May 1901), pp. 316- 317; and DeGolyer, Volume 30, pp.30+. Works numbers were 17958 and 17978 in July 1900.

These Vauclain compounds were delivered with Vanderbilt boilers with a corrugated, cylindrical firebox. Compared to the E-18s, these engines had much bigger boilers, but the grate area and firebox heating surface area were much smaller. The Vanderbilt design appealed because of its lack of staybolts, and RG's enthusiastic report of coal savings suggested a bright future.

The limitations in the expandability of a cylindrical firebox design, especially in combination with the forest of narrow fire tubes spaced 5/8" (15.875 mm) apart that the design encouraged, doomed the unorthodox approach to a very short-lived career. Both were rebuilt in 1904 as conventional-firebox, simple-expansion (21" x 30") E-19a; 1939 was retired in 1929, 1940 in 1933.

See also Bruce's comment under the Union Pacific engines.(entry 2851).


Class E-19A (Locobase 12627)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 25, p. 100. Works numbers were 21842, 21859, 21875, 21883 in March 1903; 21898, 21927, 22021 in April.

Locobase 6564 shows the Vauclain compounds (as converted to simple expansion) while this entry shows the only group of Consolidation camelbacks delivered with simple-expansion cylinders. They had slightly more cylinder volume and smaller drivers.

Like the others in this larger group of camelbacks, the seven were retired in 1925 (4) and 1933 (3).


Class E-19A (Locobase 12628)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 22, p. 250. Works numbers were

1900

17578, 17586-17589, 17598-17601, 17621-17623 in March; 17639-17641 in April; 17912-17913, 17930, 17934-17938 , 17957-17958, 17978, 17982, 17990-17993 in July; 18001-18003, 18024-18025, 18044-18048, 18076 in August; 18094, 18120-18122, 18160, 18177-18178, 18228-18229 in September; 18275-18277 in October; 18374, 18392-18394 in November; 18416-18418, 18441, 18466-18467, 18500-18503 in December.

1901

18533-18537, 18628-18630, 18651-18661 in January; 18706-18711 in February; 18725, 18736-18740 in March; 18975-18976, 19001-19006, 19030-19033 in May; 19083-19086, 19099-19102 in June.

Five were originally delivered to the Cleveland Terminal & Valley as their 1-5; works numbers were 19501-19503 in August 1901, 19518-19519 in September.

During the period that the two E-18s were completed as Vanderbilt-firebox oddities (Locobase 4142), another 109 Camelbacks were delivered as Vauclain compounds with 15 1/2" diameter HP cylinders and 26" diameter LP cylinders. As with all Wootten-type fireboxes, the ratios can seem weirdly skewed but the overall performance is in the middle of the pack. Seven more were supplied by Baldwin as simple engines in 1903 (works numbers were 21842, 21859, 21875, 21883 in March 1903; 21898, 21927, 22021 in April).

By 1905, compounding was no longer seen as an answer and the entire class was simpled; see Locobase 6564. .


Class E-19A - simpled (Locobase 6564)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005. Works numbers were:

1900

17578, 17586-17589, 17598-17601, 17621-17623 in March; 17639-17641 in April; 17912-17913, 17930, 17934-17938 , 17957-17958, 17978, 17982, 17990-17993 in July; 18001-18003, 18024-18025, 18044-18048, 18076 in August; 18094, 18120-18122, 18160, 18177-18178, 18228-18229 in September; 18275-18277 in October; 18374, 18392-18394 in November; 18416-18418, 18441, 18466-18467, 18500-18503 in December.

1901

18533-18537, 18628-18630, 18651-18661 in January; 18706-18711 in February; 18725, 18736-18740 in March; 18975-18976, 19001-19006, 19030-19033 in May; 19083-19086, 19099-19102 in June.

Five were originally delivered to the Cleveland Terminal & Valley as their 1-5; works numbers were 19501-19503 in August 1901, 19518-19519 in September.

During the period that the two E-18s were completed as Vanderbilt-firebox oddities (Locobase 4142), another 109 Camelbacks were delivered as Vauclain compounds with 15 1/2" diameter HP cylinders and 26" diameter LP cylinders. Seven more were supplied by Baldwin as simple engines in 1903 (works numbers were 21842, 21859, 21875, 21883 in March 1903; 21898, 21927, 22021 in April).

By 1905, compounding was no longer seen as an answer and the entire class was simpled to the configuration shown here. As with all Wootten-type fireboxes, the ratios seem skewed but the overall performance is in the middle of the pack.


Class E-23 (Locobase 9477)

Data from Angus Sinclair (ed), Railway and Locomotive Engineering, February 1903, p. 90.

For some reason, Sinclair does not include wheelbases or the tender's loaded weight. In any case, these were unusual Consolidations on the B & O for a couple of reasons. First, they were built by Schenectady, not Baldwin, and second, they were quite a bit bigger than other contemporary 2-8-0s in B & O service.


Class E-24 (Locobase 4796)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005.

See Railway and Locomotive Historical Bulletin #124 for a full account of this, the most numerous single class built by the Pennsy (or any other US railroad). As Richard D. Adams explains, these locomotives dated from the days when the Pennsylvania Railroad controlled the Baltimore & Ohio (1901-1906). As such, they were duplicates of the Pennsy's H-6 class and were among the few B&O engines with Belpaire boilers. Most were later superheated as H-6sb (New EHS was 2,140 sq ft to which was added 378 sq ft of SHS -- 15% of the total)

Pittsburgh, Richmond, and Rogers each supplied engines from 1902-1904.

148 built from 1906-1908. ALCO-Pittsburgh constructed 90, Baldwin 25, and Juniata 33.

In1911, the B & O ordered a special 2-6-8-0 based on these Consolidations. Using the E-24 to power the rear cylinders, the B & O bought another boiler and engine set that had a feedwater heater with 369 2" tubes of much shorter length (8 feet 3 inches) and a total heating service area of 1,594 sq ft. The LP cylinders under this boiler section had 34" diameters.

Thirty-one E-24s became E-24a in 1930 when they were fitted with Walschaerts gear and piston valves. These endured until 1951-1956.


Class E-26 - simpled (Locobase 16201)

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details. Data from B & OSW diagram book dated July 1900 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 21, p. 248 and "New Freight Locomotives for the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern," Engineering News, Volume 40, No. 17 (27 October 1898), p. 262. Baldwin works numbers were 16232-16233 in September 1898.

These were delivered as Vauclain compounds in which each of two 12" (305 mm) piston valves served a set of one high-pressure and one low-pressure cylinder. The valve alternated between supplying live steam to the HP cylinder and that cylinder's exhausted steam to the larger LP cylinder.


Class E-26 simpled (Locobase 2021)

Data from B&OSW 10-1901 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. See also Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details.

Sturdy, powerful freight engines that entered service as Vauclain compounds; see Locobase 16199.

Converted to simples soon after they entered service. Renumbered and reclassified as H-2s in 1900 by the B&O and ran until 1936, except for the 1586, which ran until 1945.


Class E-27 (Locobase 2885)

Data from "Consolidation for the B&O", Railway and Locomotive Engineering, Volume 19, No 1 (January 1906) with additional information from J Snowden Bell (1912). Works numbers were 38233 in August 1908, 38234-38280 in November 1905, 38281-38372 in 1906; Richmond continued with

38373-38386 in December 1905 38387-38434 in January 1906, and 38435-8442 in April

By far the largest single class of Consolidations built for the B&O. Schenectady and Richmond both supplied locomotives over a five-year period with Schenectady delivering the first 134 and Richmond supplying the last 75. R&LE reported that five of the engines were to be equippped with Walschaert valve gear.

One of the two superheated updates of this class in found in Locobase 3095. The last of these retired in 1959.


Class E-27b - 2 1/4"" tubes (Locobase 14451)

Data from B&O to 1954 Assorted Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were 46736 in December 1909, 46737-46768 in January 1901, 47122-47171 in February.

When Richmond resumed production in 1909 of this large class of 22"x 30" Consolidations (see Locobase 2885 for the first 205), its first 84 locomotives were essentially repeats of the 1905 design. Tube diameter remained 2 1/4" (57.15 mm) and the count only dropped by two. One change was the use of outside Walschaert radial valve gear in place of the inside link motion. Another was a 2" (50.8 mm) increase in driver diameter.

The next 120 would adopt a new arrangements of tubes; see Locobase 11373. Many E-27s were superheated; see Locobase 3095.


Class E-27b - 2"" tubes (Locobase 11373)

Data from "Equipment & Supplies", Railway Age Gazette, Vol XLVIII, No 19 (13 May 1910), p. 1240 and B&O to 1954 Assorted Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. Works numbers were , 48204-48228 in April, 48590-48634, 48737-48764 in July, and 48765-48786 in September.

The RAG report simply notes the order, but does not comment on the fact that the boiler in these Consolidations now held almost four dozen more tubes of a smaller diameter than any of the E-27 class that had preceded them.


Class E-27ca (Locobase 3095)

Although the E-27s were delivered without superheaters, many were later converted. This set of specifications is the result, as detailed in a comparison of B&O locomotives in Railway Age 11 July 1931 and supplemented B&O to 1954 Assorted Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

E-27a and E-27b saturated-boiler locomotives were converted to superheated engines, some more than once. When the E-27bs received 25-element superheaters but retained their 22" cylinders, they were redesignated E-27c. When that design was modfied with the installation of 24" cylinders, they became E-27ca. One E-27b (2722) was retrofitted with Caprotti poppet valves and redesignated E-27j.

The amount of superheat isn't dramatic, but it doubtless made some difference. One E-27--2794--was refitted with yet another superheated boiler. The superheater now consisted of 34 5 1/2" flues with elements contributing 743.5 sq ft (69.1 sq m) to the overall heating surface area. The firebox now held a thermic syphon that added 46.8 sq ft (4.35 sq m) to the direct heating surface area. Small tube count dropped by 38 to accommodate the larger superheater. The overall result was very nearly the same evaporative heating surface area (now down slightly to 2,257.8 sq ft or 209.75 sq m), but the ratio of superheat to overall heating surface area zoomed to 24.8%). Boiler pressure increased by 10 psi.

Most E-27s were rebuilt as L-2 0-8-0s in 1924-1929.


Class E-29 (Locobase 2050)

This largest group of Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Consolidations was built by Brooks (401-402, 404-419) and Baldwin (420-434). 400-401 were not renumbered by the B&O, but 404-434 received 1706-1736. All were retired by 1937.

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964). Note that the Brooks locomotives had 304 tubes rather than the 299 shown in the specs. Their total evaporative heating surface amounted to approximately 2,380 sq ft.


Class E-31 (Locobase 2051)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005.

The last group of Consolidations built for the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton, these engines were renumbered by the B&O as 2914-2933.


Class E-38 (Locobase 2108)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005. See also DeGolyer, Volume 62, pp. 74. Works number was 48895 in June 1918.

M&K Railroad Consolidation of stubby profile. Although it had the same power dimensions as the #8 (later B & O class E-40) shown in Locobase 2110 , this was a smaller locomotive in all respects except for weight. 12" (305 mm) piston valves supplied the cylinders. Firebox heating surface area later reduced to 195.7 sq ft (18.2 sq m), leading to a commensurate drop in evaporative heating surface to 1,992 sq ft (185.13 sq m)

Renumbered 414 and retired by 1939.


Class E-39 (Locobase 2109)

Data from Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964). See also DeGolyer, Volumes 26, p. 34 and 29, p. 59. Works numbers were 22575 in July 1903 and 23301 in December.

Relatively light M&K Railroad Consolidations. Renumbered 415-416 and retired by 1947.


Class E-41 (Locobase 2072)

Data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005. See also DeGolyer, Vol 55, p. 238+. Works numbers were 42870-42879 in February 1916.

Rail weights were 56-70 lb/yard (28-35 kg/metre), grades ascended as high as 1.3% and curves arced around at 16 degrees. Twelve-inch (306 mm) piston valves let steam into the cylinders. Firebox heating surface included 21.4 sq ft (2 sq m) in three arch tubes.

Consolidations renumbered by the B&O to 425-434 in 1927 and 590-599 in 1943. The first of these to be scrapped went in September 1948 (592-593) and the last was broken up a year later in September 1949 (597).


Class E-6 (Locobase 16311)

Data from "Consolidation Locomotive, Class E-6, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad", Railroad Gazette, Volume 21 (2 August 1889), pp. 508-509.

After publishing the detailed specification prepared by the railroad, the RG's editor noted some "admirable points" that underscore how much little things might matter:

A slight countersinking of the rivet holes before driving in the rivets was "often neglected in the average locomotive specification.

" Each crown bar was braced by four stays to the shell of the boiler; "Generally only two to every other bar is specified".

"The caution against grooving the lower sheet when caulking joints should always be brought into prominence".

Apparently concluding that the B&O's frame welds might not be trustworthy, RG noted that the requirement that frame pedestal should be solid slabs was "novel but necessary".

Locobase can't say what "jumping on valve yoke stems to the yoke" might mean, but RG approved of the prohibition of such practice. "No other weld about a locomotive gives more trouble than the one at this point, and nothing short of forging the front sides of the yokes all in one piece will remove it." It is certain that at this point, welds were still made through hammering and single-piece components were forged rather than cast.


Class E-60/E-60a (Locobase 2083)

The class lasted until 1955-57. Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and data from Alvin F Staufer's Baltimore & Ohio Steam and Electric Locomotives (Medina, Ohio) supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005.

Similar to the BR&P X-class Consolidations, but fitted with much smaller drivers. Brooks delivered 123-125 (later E-60A) in 1904 and followed with 126-134 (1905) and 135-143, 147, 148 (1906). Pittsburgh contributed 149-158 in 1907, and Brooks finished the class with 159-168 in 1908.

NB: Railway Age Gazette of 28 January 1910 (p. 214) reported that the B & S had contracted for 10 Consolidations from Alco (works not specified). These were to have 375 2" tubes and a total evaporative heating surface of 2,676 sq ft. Locobase cannot determine if these were considered to be E-60b locomotives.

43 survivors were renumbered by the B&O from 3100-3142.


Class E-8 (Locobase 12069)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 18, p. 182. Works numbers were 12515-12516, 12520, 12522-12523, 12529-12531, 12536, 12545 in March 1893; 13349, 13365-13366, 13377 in April; 13528-13530, 13533-13536, 13545-13546, 13548-13552 in June; 13568, 13574 in July.

This set of 30 2-8-0s was one in a series of Consolidation batches supplied by several builders that shared most of the important dimensions. The E-8s enjoyed long careers, although the first few were retired in 1923 and a few more in 1928. Most, however, were scrapped in the late 1930s and throughout the 1940s.

1214 took a detour in 1942 when it was leased by the Strouds Creek & Muddlety in West Virginia; numbered 200, the engine operated on the SC & M for 2 years. 1239 was sold to the Middle Creek Railroad (also in West Virginia) in 1942. It was scrapped in 1951 after the MC RR was abandoned.


Class E-9 (Locobase 11687)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines, 1888, as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University Vol 16, p. 6.

Works number was 10759-10769 in April 1890.

After service with the B & O, some of these Consolidations had second careers. 1201 went to the Cheswick & Harmar, 1206 and 1210 were sold to the Winchester & Western. The C & H served western Pennsylvania and supplied Duquesne Power & Light in particular. The Ol' Weak & Weary operated between Winchester, WVa and Wardensville.


Class H-1/E-26 (Locobase 2020)

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details. Data from B & OSW diagram book dated July 1900 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 21, p. 248. Baldwin works numbers were 16184-16185, 16226-16231 in September 1898. See Locobase 2017 for the origins of the B & OSW.

Size and number make this a classic Consolidation class. The B&O reclassified them as E-26 in 1900 and ran them for 30 years. 1542-1543 were scrapped in 1928, 1537-1538 and 1540-1541 retired in 1933, and 1539 and 1544 were scrapped in 1935.


Class H-1/E-26 compound (Locobase 16200)

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details. Data from B & OSW diagram book dated July 1900 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 21, p. 248 and "New Freight Locomotives for the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern," Engineering News, Volume 40, No. 17 (27 October 1898), p. 262. Baldwin works numbers were 16232-16233 in September 1898.

These were delivered after the eight H-1s simple-expansion locomotives (as Vauclain compounds in which each of two 12" (305 mm) piston valves served a set of one high-pressure and one low-pressure cylinder. The valve alternated between supplying live steam to the HP cylinder and that cylinder's exhausted steam to the larger LP cylinder.

They were soon simpled as hybrids of the earlier


Class H-2 compound/E-26A (Locobase 16199)

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B&O Power (1964) for details. See also DeGolyer, Volume 22, p. 79; and ; and "Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Consolication Locomotive", Locomotive Engineering, Volume 12, No 2 (February 1899), p. 67. (Thanks to Wes Barris of steamlocomotive.com for his 28 June 2018 email reporting the missing metric equivalents to cylinder diameter and stroke.) Works numbers were 16232-16233 in September 1899; 16531-16534 in 1899; 16549-16559, 16596-16610 in March; and 16648-16655 in April.

Five months after the first of the Vauclain compound Consolidations built with the longer stroke (Locobase 2021), these slightly enlarged examples entered series production. Each set of one HP and one LP cylinder used a single 12" (305 mm) piston valve.

Converted to simples soon after they entered service; see Locobase 2020.


Class H/E-25 (Locobase 2019)

See Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) for details. Data from B & OSW diagram book dated July 1900 supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange May 2005. See Locobase 2017 for the origins of the B & OSW.

Low-drivered Consolidations that were reclassified E-25 on the B&O in 1900 and ran until 1934. .


Class H2/E-47 (Locobase 9097)

Data from C&A 6 - 1918, 12 - 1920 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange. See also DeGolyer, Volume 25, p. 17; and "Some New Engines for the Chicago & Alton,", Railroad Gazette, Volume XXXIV [34], No 36 (5 September 1902), pp. 688. Works numbers ran 20623-20624 in June 1902, 20638-20639, 20658-20659, 20682-20683, 20722, 20743 in July.

These Consolidations stand as good representatives of the upper limit of tube count in a saturated boiler. 442 holes in a tube plate must have represented something of a maintenance nightmare. The Alton updated its Baldwin spec by omitting the combustion tubes originally intended for installation in the firebox.

Otherwise, the designs had the usual features for a turn-of-the-century 2-8-0, although 12" (305 mm) piston valves were not common. They were, however, not comely. The stubby frame supported a straight boiler topped by a small dome set well back. A large cab further distorted the proportions.

All of these were later superheated; see Locobase 9098.


Class H2a - superheatd/E47a (Locobase 9098)

Data from C&A 6 - 1918, 12 - 1920 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange.

Delivered with a saturated boiler stuffed with boiler tubes (see Locobase 9097), this class later adopted a modestly scaled superheater installation that, even so, nearly offset the the loss in heating surface from sacrificing 191 tubes for 36 flues. Unlike other C & A updates, this design retained its Stephenson valve gear.


Class P/ E-51 (Locobase 2610)

Data from Catalogue Descriptive of Simple and Compound Locomotives built by Brooks Locomotive Works, Dunkirk, NY (Buffalo, NY: Matthew-Northrup Company, 1899).

Builder info from B.Rumary, 25 Kingscombe, Gurney Slade, Radstock, BA3 4TH, ENGLAND and Jeremy Lambert as supplied by Allen Stanley in March 2004. Works numbers 2230-31, 2234, 2236, 2239, 2243, 2246, 2248, 2295-96, /road #117-126, 2-8-0s began delivery in February and May 1893 with works numbers 2413-2420 (128-135) following in March 1894.

Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh class with "improved" Belpaired boiler typically long and narrow and a firebox with 15.7 sq ft of arch pipes. Note the very small drivers for a standard-gauge engine.

Only 6 passed into B&O hands in 1932: 117, 120, 121, 123, 129, 131, and 135 became 3004-3006 respectively.

Locobase summarizes the successor railroads for some of the others because he's fascinated by the variety of destinations.

118 eventually wound up on the Tennessee Railroad;

119 on the Marinette, Tomahawk & Western;

122 to the Gosa-Steele Lumber Co as their 404;

124 was sold to the Nahma & Northern;

125 to the J. W. Wells Lumber Co., Monominee, Michigan;

126 went to the Plattsburgh Railway as their #2;

128 went to the New York & Pennsylvania

130 was owned successively by the Kosciusko & Southern in Mississippi and Georgia's Gainesville Northwestern.

133 wound up on the Pittsburgh & Susquehanna

The others were sold for scrap.


Class V-2, V-3, V-4//E-58a,-58b,-58c (Locobase 2062)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works, Record of Recent Construction ((1903), No. 36, p. 178-179. See also DeGolyer, Volume 24, p.279 and Volume 25, p. 277.. The 1902 locomotives formed the V2 class, the 1903 engines were dubbed V3. Works numbers were 20261, 20310-20311 in April 1902; 20719-20720 in July 1902; 22232, 22260, 22268 in May 1903; 22352, 22427 in June 1903; and 23215-23216, 23230, 23273, 23277 in November 1903.

High-boilered Consolidation series that varied from the Xs (Locobase 9480) by having a larger cylinder diameter and slightly smaller drivers. In most other respects, these Baldwins were smaller than the Brooks-built Xs, but still represented a typical Consolidation in size for its time.

B&O classes E-58/-58a/-58b, numbers 3083 to 3096; all retired by 1936.


Class V/VR/E-58b (Locobase 4149)

Data from Railroad Gazette 13 September 1901. See also DeGolyer, Volume 24, p. 13. Works number was 19198 in July 1901.

One of the few engines built with a Vanderbilt stayless boiler, this engine had all the earmarks of the unusual design. Cylindrical firebox with relatively small heating surface and lots of boiler tubes. The Baldwin specs described the firebox's combustion chamber as a "cinder pocket". Possibly because the Vanderbilt boiler was so unusual, Baldwin uncharacteristically over-estimated the adhesion and engine weights.

The 250 was rebuilt in 1907 with a conventional boiler as class VR.

See Locobases 4104 and 5257 entries for further comments on the Vanderbilt boiler.


Class X/X-2/X-3/X-4 - saturated (Locobase 9480)

Data from Angus Sinclair (ed), Railway and Locomotive Engineering, April 1903, p. 187. 2004. Also see "Comparative Service Tests of Locomotives," Railway Age Gazette (Vol. 53, No 11, 13 September 1912), pp.469-472. Works numbers were 26460-26468 in Febuary 1902 and 26469 in January; 26554-26563 in October 1902; 27748-27767 in May 1904; 30126-30135 in October; 30385-30389 in January 1905; 37755-37774 in July; 40672-40677 in October 1906; 42441-42454 in June 1907;44540-44542 and 44543-44549 in November; 46400-46407 in August 1908; 46652-46655 in September.

High-boilered Consolidation series built from 1902 to 1909. According to Sinclair's Twentieth Century Locomotives, written in 1902, the design "...embraces the ideas of C E Turner, the superintendent of motive power." They used piston valves instead of the more typical slide valves.

The superheated modification appears in Locobase 2061.


Class X/X-2/X-3/X-4 - superheated (Locobase 2061)

Alvin F Staufer & Lawrence W Sagle, B & O Power (1964) and data from 1942 L & A diagram book supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange in March 2004. Also see "Comparative Service Tests of Locomotives," Railway Age Gazette (Vol. 53, No 11, 13 September 1912), pp.469-472.

High-boilered Consolidation series built from 1902 to 1909 and shown in Locobase 9480. The tests described in the September 1912 RAG featured a boiler design that appears to have been shared with the superheated Atlantic (Locobase 9637) tested in the same year. Compared to the savings recorded in the 4-4-2s, those of the 2-8-0 were more that 100% greater. That is, whereas the Atlantic showed a 22% advantage in the superheated design, the superheated Consolidation used 47% less coal and water per ton-mile than the saturated variant.

Although assembled into many subclasses during the B&O renumbering, the design was essentially unchanged over the production run. The X-6 engines (12 in all) weighed slightly more. B&O classes E-52 to E-57a, numbers 3000 to 3070; somo X-3, X-4 engines lasted until 1950. Three were sold to the Louisiana & Arkansas as engine number 241-243.


Class unknown (Locobase 5872)

Summarized in a description of several locomotive classes recently delivered to the Baltimore & Ohio in American Engineer, Car Builder and Railroad Journal (AERJ) in 1895.

Quite a bit smaller in every dimension than the 10 described in Locobase 5871. However, the tubes were slightly longer. Brian Rumary's list of Richmond works numbers sets the production date as August 1896 and works numbers 2552-2576.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class105 / E-28a11/E-3219/E-333 /E-463/E-37
Locobase ID2095 2101 2102 13,798 2107
RailroadChicago Terminal Transfer (B&O)Coal & Coke (B&O)Coal & Coke (B&O)Indian Creek Valley (B & O)Morgantown & Kingwood (B & O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class641211
Road Numbers105-110 /1966-1971 / 794-79911-12, 15-16/40-43/1737-174019-20, 23-30/52-61/2934-29453 / 4403/413/588
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built641211
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwinBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19011904190619111906
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.67 / 4.4714.25 / 4.3414.25 / 4.3413.67 / 4.1714 / 4.27
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23.42 / 7.1422.33 / 6.8122.83 / 6.9621.83 / 6.6521.50 / 6.55
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.63 0.64 0.62 0.63 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)50.08 / 15.2653.12 / 16.1951.17 / 15.6047.29 / 14.41
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)45,000 / 20,412
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)168,000 / 76,204128,600 / 58,332167,600 / 76,022127,700 / 57,924118,000 / 53,524
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)190,290 / 86,314142,800 / 64,773184,000 / 83,461143,900 / 65,272135,000 / 61,235
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)110,000 / 49,895120,000 / 54,431105,000 / 47,62780,000 / 36,287100,000 / 45,359
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)300,290 / 136,209262,800 / 119,204289,000 / 131,088223,900 / 101,559235,000 / 106,594
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.734000 / 15.155000 / 18.94
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)6 / 5.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)70 / 3554 / 2770 / 3553 / 26.5049 / 24.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)51 / 129550 / 127051 / 129551 / 129550 / 1270
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)220 / 15.20180 / 12.40190 / 13.10180 / 12.40190 / 13.10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 28" / 559x71121" x 26" / 533x66022" x 28" / 559x71120" x 24" / 508x61020" x 24" / 508x610
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)49,691 / 22539.4935,086 / 15914.7642,915 / 19465.9428,800 / 13063.4831,008 / 14065.01
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.38 3.67 3.91 4.43 3.81
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)172.50 / 16.03166 / 15.42200 / 18.58162 / 15.05138 / 12.83
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)46.75 / 4.3433.40 / 3.1037.20 / 3.4632.90 / 3.0629.93 / 2.78
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2786 / 258.922022 / 187.852630 / 244.331971 / 183.111608 / 149.44
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2786 / 258.922022 / 187.852630 / 244.331971 / 183.111608 / 149.44
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume226.15194.00213.49225.86184.26
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation10,2856012706859225687
Same as above plus superheater percentage10,2856012706859225687
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area37,95029,88038,00029,16026,220
Power L155384104475948764169
Power MT290.69281.42250.40336.72311.56

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class5/13/E-3370/E-3474/E-358/E-4080E-36
Locobase ID16,198 13,905 6700 2110 2104
RailroadRoaring Creek & Belington (B&O)Coal & Coke (B&O)Coal & Coke (B&O)Morgantown & Kingwood (B&O)Coal & Coke (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class26262
Road Numbers5-6/13-14/2934-293570-73/2946-294974-75/2950-29518-13/417-42280-81/2952-2953
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built26262
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwinBaldwinBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwin
Year19031912191419071916
Valve GearStephensonBakerBakerWalschaertBaker
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.25 / 4.3414.25 / 4.3414.25 / 4.3414.25 / 4.3414.25 / 4.34
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.83 / 6.9623.08 / 7.0323.08 / 7.0322.83 / 6.9623.25 / 7.09
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.62 0.62 0.62 0.62 0.61
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)53.12 / 16.1955.81 / 17.0155.79 / 1753.26 / 16.2355.83 / 17.02
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)159,800 / 72,484162,000 / 73,482159,850 / 72,507165,580 / 75,106176,000 / 79,832
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)175,900 / 79,787180,000 / 81,647177,850 / 80,671178,600 / 81,012198,800 / 90,174
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)120,000 / 54,431125,000 / 56,699125,000 / 56,699120,000 / 54,431131,200 / 59,511
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)295,900 / 134,218305,000 / 138,346302,850 / 137,370298,600 / 135,443330,000 / 149,685
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.737000 / 26.527000 / 26.526000 / 22.737000 / 26.52
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)14 / 12.7014 / 12.709 / 8.2017 / 15.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)67 / 33.5068 / 3467 / 33.5069 / 34.5073 / 36.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)51 / 129551 / 129551 / 129551 / 129552 / 1321
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)190 / 13.10190 / 13.10190 / 13.10200 / 13.80190 / 13.10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 28" / 559x71122" x 28" / 559x71122" x 28" / 559x71122" x 28" / 559x71123" x 28" / 584x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)42,915 / 19465.9442,915 / 19465.9442,915 / 19465.9445,173 / 20490.1546,003 / 20866.63
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.72 3.77 3.72 3.67 3.83
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)200 / 18.58179 / 16.63185 / 17.19199 / 18.49212 / 19.70
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)37.20 / 3.4648.20 / 4.4848.20 / 4.4835.40 / 3.2952.30 / 4.86
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2630 / 244.332690 / 249.912696 / 250.462629 / 244.242473 / 229.83
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)526 / 48.88
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2630 / 244.332690 / 249.912696 / 250.462629 / 244.242999 / 278.71
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume213.49218.36218.85213.41183.67
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation70689158915870809937
Same as above plus superheater percentage706891589158708011,726
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area38,00034,01035,15039,80047,530
Power L1475947004747500110,110
Power MT262.62255.84261.88266.34506.56

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassClass CClass E/E-26Class HClass H-1 /E-22Class H-3
Locobase ID2030 2022 2031 2032 2033
RailroadPittsburgh & Western (B&O)Pittsburgh Junction (B&O)Pittsburgh & Western (B&O)Pittsburgh & Western (B&O)Pittsburgh & Western (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class42952
Road Numbers71-74 / 85-86, 62-638-964-65, 87, 8955-5960, 95 / 1941-1942
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built42952
BuilderPittsburghPittsburghPittsburghPittsburghPittsburgh
Year18871892189519011900
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14 / 4.27
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.08 / 6.73
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.63
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)52.45 / 15.99
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)148,000 / 67,132
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)94,000 / 42,638160,000 / 72,575160,000 / 72,575176,000 / 79,832168,000 / 76,204
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)79,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)239,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3500
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)62 / 31
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)50 / 127050 / 127050 / 127054 / 137254 / 1372
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)145 / 10170 / 11.70160 / 11180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61022" x 28" / 559x71122" x 28" / 559x71122" x 28" / 559x71121.5" x 30" / 546x762
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)19,168 / 8694.4739,165 / 17764.9736,861 / 16719.8938,397 / 17416.6139,291 / 17822.12
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.78
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)169.50 / 15.38
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)35.50 / 3.30
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2319 / 215.52
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2319 / 215.52
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume188.24
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6035
Same as above plus superheater percentage6035
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area28,815
Power L13641
Power MT216.95

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassEE / E-30E-11aE-14E-16
Locobase ID1443 6565 5871 3147 12,591
RailroadStaten Island Rapid Transit (B & O)Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class115104560
Road Numbers28420-434 / 1722-17361600-16091266-1299, 1516-15361645-1704
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built115104560
BuilderCookeBurnham, Williams & CoCookeBurnham, Williams & CoPittsburgh
Year19061905189518971898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16 / 4.8815 / 4.5715.17 / 4.62
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.25 / 7.3923.17 / 7.0623.17 / 7.06
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.66 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)52.43 / 15.9851.58 / 15.72
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)39,290 / 17,822
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)152,000 / 68,946152,000 / 68,946137,000 / 62,142155,000 / 70,307
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)116,000 / 52,617172,000 / 78,018166,000 / 75,296150,000 / 68,039168,000 / 76,204
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)106,560 / 48,335102,260 / 46,38482,830 / 37,571
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)278,560 / 126,353268,260 / 121,680232,830 / 105,610
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)7000 / 26.524000 / 15.154000 / 15.154500 / 17.05
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)12 / 10.90 9.50 / 8.60
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)63 / 31.5063 / 31.5057 / 28.5065 / 32.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)50 / 127057 / 144854 / 137250 / 127054 / 1372
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40200 / 13.80180 / 12.40180 / 12.40185 / 12.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)20" x 28" / 508x71119.5" x 28" / 495x71121" x 28" / 533x71121" x 26" / 533x66022" x 28" / 559x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)34,272 / 15545.5431,754 / 14403.3934,986 / 15869.4035,086 / 15914.7639,464 / 17900.59
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.79 4.34 3.90 3.93
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)173.65 / 16.14182.50 / 16.96179.91 / 16.72185.36 / 17.23
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)45.30 / 4.2137.76 / 3.5133.83 / 3.1433.60 / 3.12
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2353 / 218.682338 / 217.291960 / 182.162317 / 215.33
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2353 / 218.682338 / 217.291960 / 182.162317 / 215.33
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume243.12208.29188.05188.08
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation9060679760896216
Same as above plus superheater percentage9060679760896216
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area34,73032,85032,38434,292
Power L16324469141154384
Power MT366.90272.15264.88249.42

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-17 / E-17aE-18E-19E-19AE-19A
Locobase ID6563 3928 4142 12,627 12,628
RailroadBaltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class539277
Road Numbers1640-16441900-19381939-19401959-19651815-1899, 1771-1799
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built539277
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year18981900190019031900
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)15.33 / 4.6715.33 / 4.6715.33 / 4.6715.33 / 4.67
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23.67 / 7.2123.67 / 7.2123.67 / 7.2123.67 / 7.21
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)53.42 / 16.2857.62 / 17.5657.62 / 17.56
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)42,100 / 19,096
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)155,600 / 70,579163,330 / 74,085170,800 / 77,474159,000 / 72,121
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)171,300 / 77,700182,330 / 82,704193,000 / 87,543187,890 / 85,226178,000 / 80,740
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)102,260 / 46,384100,000 / 45,359100,000 / 45,359
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)273,560 / 124,084282,330 / 128,063293,000 / 132,902
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)9000 / 34.095000 / 18.945000 / 18.947000 / 26.527000 / 26.52
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)10.50 / 9.50
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)65 / 32.5068 / 3471 / 35.5066 / 33
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)55 / 139754 / 137254 / 137254 / 137254 / 1372
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)190 / 13.10200 / 13.80190 / 13.10200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 28" / 533x71115.5" x 30" / 394x76215.5" x 30" / 394x76221.5" x 30" / 546x76215.5" x 30" / 394x762
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26" x 30" / 660x76226" x 30" / 660x76226" x 30" / 660x762
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)39,794 / 18050.2833,481 / 15186.7431,807 / 14427.4343,657 / 19802.5133,481 / 15186.74
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.91 4.88 5.37 4.75
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)188 / 18.09204.60 / 19.01135 / 12.55185.70 / 17.26187.50 / 16.68
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)33.60 / 3.1233.70 / 3.1333 / 3.0776 / 7.0676 / 7.06
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2331 / 216.262348 / 218.132750 / 255.582334 / 216.912355 / 218.22
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2331 / 216.262348 / 218.132750 / 255.582334 / 216.912355 / 218.22
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume189.22358.37419.73185.15359.44
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation63846740627015,20015,200
Same as above plus superheater percentage63846740627015,20015,200
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area35,72040,92025,65037,14037,500
Power L146253291317746593215
Power MT262.12177.69164.03178.31

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-19A - simpledE-23E-24E-26 - simpledE-26 simpled
Locobase ID6564 9477 4796 16,201 2021
RailroadBaltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class1164197240
Road Numbers1766-1899, 1939-401955-19581706-36, 39-53. 2200-239+1558-15591560-1599
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built11642
BuilderB&OAlco-SchenectadySeveralBurnham, Williams & CoB&O
Year19041902190119041904
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)15.33 / 4.6716.54 / 5.0415.25 / 4.6515.25 / 4.65
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23.67 / 7.2124.75 / 7.5423.50 / 7.1623.50 / 7.16
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.67 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)53.25 / 16.2357.33 / 17.4757.98 / 17.6753.42 / 16.2855.42 / 16.89
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)48,400 / 21,95444,520 / 20,19437,195 / 16,871
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)166,000 / 75,296162,000 / 73,482173,000 / 78,472147,700 / 66,996145,030 / 65,785
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)181,400 / 82,282186,000 / 84,368193,500 / 87,770162,200 / 73,573162,580 / 73,745
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)102,260 / 46,384143,370 / 65,03298,000 / 44,452104,650 / 47,468
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)283,660 / 128,666336,870 / 152,802260,200 / 118,025267,230 / 121,213
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)5000 / 18.945900 / 22.357000 / 26.525000 / 18.945000 / 18.94
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)10.50 / 9.5010 / 9.1015 / 13.6010.50 / 9.5012 / 10.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)69 / 34.5068 / 3472 / 3662 / 3160 / 30
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)55 / 139757 / 144856 / 142256 / 142256 / 1422
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80190 / 13.10190 / 13.10200 / 13.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)21" x 30" / 533x76221" x 30" / 533x76222" x 28" / 559x71120.5" x 28" / 521x71120.5" x 28" / 521x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)40,893 / 18548.7737,485 / 17002.9339,083 / 17727.7735,721 / 16202.7935,721 / 16202.79
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.06 4.32 4.43 4.13 4.06
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)189.27 / 17.59177.74 / 16.52184.35 / 17.13172.14 / 15.99152.14 / 14.14
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)76 / 7.0650.32 / 4.6849 / 4.5532.70 / 3.0432.70 / 3.04
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2350 / 218.403476 / 323.052847 / 264.592120 / 196.952251 / 209.20
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2350 / 218.403476 / 323.052847 / 264.592120 / 196.952251 / 209.20
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume195.40289.03231.10198.20210.44
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation15,2009561931065406540
Same as above plus superheater percentage15,2009561931065406540
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area37,85433,77135,02734,42830,428
Power L150256551542552025256
Power MT266.94356.60276.53310.59319.59

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-27E-27b - 2 1/4"" tubesE-27b - 2"" tubesE-27caE-29
Locobase ID2885 14,451 11,373 3095 2050
RailroadBaltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class2098412014133
Road Numbers2501-27092710-27932794-2913400-401,404-434 / 1704-1736
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built2098412033
BuilderAlcoAlco-RichmondAlco-RichmondB&Oseveral
Year1905190919101905
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertStephensonBakerWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.67 / 5.0816.67 / 5.0816.67 / 5.0816.67 / 5.0816 / 4.88
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)25.58 / 7.8025.58 / 7.8025.58 / 7.8025.58 / 7.8024.25 / 7.39
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.66
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)59.69 / 18.1959.62 / 18.1759.69 / 18.1959.71 / 18.20
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)53,900 / 24,449
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)185,900 / 84,323198,650 / 90,106195,580 / 88,714203,550 / 92,329151,000 / 68,493
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)208,500 / 94,574220,370 / 99,958220,300 / 99,927226,550 / 102,761171,000 / 77,564
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)143,500 / 65,091148,070 / 67,164148,070148,070 / 67,164
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)352,000 / 159,665368,440 / 167,122368,370374,620 / 169,925
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)7000 / 26.527500 / 28.417500 / 28.417000 / 26.525000 / 18.94
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)15 / 13.6018 / 16.4015 / 13.6018 / 16.4012 / 10.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)77 / 38.5083 / 41.5081 / 40.5085 / 42.5063 / 31.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)60 / 152462 / 157562 / 152462 / 157557 / 1448
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)205 / 14.10205 / 14.10205 / 14.10215 / 14.80200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 30" / 559x76222" x 30" / 559x76222" x 30" / 559x76224" x 30" / 610x76219.5" x 28" / 495x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)42,169 / 19127.5640,808 / 18510.2240,808 / 18510.2250,934 / 23103.3031,754 / 14403.39
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.41 4.87 4.79 4.00 4.76
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)179.30 / 16.66179.30 / 16.66179.30 / 16.66179.30 / 16.66157.20 / 14.61
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)56.24 / 5.2357.05 / 5.3057.05 / 5.3056.24 / 5.2245.30 / 4.21
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2809 / 261.062774 / 257.712848 / 264.682393 / 222.322334 / 216.91
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)425 / 39.48
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2809 / 261.062774 / 257.712848 / 264.682818 / 261.802334 / 216.91
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume212.82210.17215.77152.34241.16
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation11,52911,69511,69512,0929060
Same as above plus superheater percentage11,52911,69511,69513,9059060
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area36,75736,75736,75744,33231,440
Power L157555891601010,0626125
Power MT273.00261.51270.98435.92357.70

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-31E-38E-39E-41E-6
Locobase ID2051 2108 2109 2072 16,311
RailroadCincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (B&O)Morgantown & Kingwood (B & O)Morgantown & Kingwood (B & O)Cincinnati, Indianapolis, & Western (B & O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class20121011
Road Numbers601-62045-6301-310 / 590-599538-543, 545-549
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built20121011
BuilderBrooksBaldwinBurnham, Williams & CoBaldwinB&O
Year19101918190319161888
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertSouthernStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)16.67 / 5.0814.25 / 4.3414 / 4.2715.75 / 4.8015.17 / 4.62
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)25.58 / 7.8022.83 / 6.9621.50 / 6.5524.75 / 7.5423.17 / 7.06
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.62 0.65 0.64 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)59.14 / 18.0353.71 / 16.3767.37 / 20.5348.62 / 14.82
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)50,700 / 22,997
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)192,000 / 87,090170,900 / 77,519110,000 / 49,895176,000 / 79,832112,900 / 51,211
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)216,000 / 97,976188,200 / 85,366128,000 / 58,060195,100 / 88,496124,300 / 56,382
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)144,000 / 65,317120,000 / 54,43180,000 / 36,287145,000 / 65,77162,000 / 28,123
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)360,000 / 163,293308,200 / 139,797208,000 / 94,347340,100 / 154,267186,300 / 84,505
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)7000 / 26.526300 / 23.864000 / 15.157000 / 26.523500 / 13.26
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)14 / 12.7012 / 10.9012 / 10.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)80 / 4071 / 35.5046 / 2373 / 36.5047 / 23.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)61 / 154950 / 127050 / 127057 / 144850 / 1270
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80200 / 13.80180 / 12.40200 / 13.80170 / 11.70
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 30" / 559x76222" x 28" / 559x71120" x 24" / 508x61022" x 28" / 559x71120" x 26" / 508x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)40,466 / 18355.0946,077 / 20900.2029,376 / 13324.7540,418 / 18333.3230,056 / 13633.19
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.74 3.71 3.74 4.35 3.76
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)182 / 16.91208 / 19.32138187.40 / 17.41
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)54.50 / 5.0735.44 / 3.2929.90 / 2.7849 / 4.5528.75 / 2.67
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2779 / 258.272004 / 186.1816082068 / 192.12
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)498 / 46.27
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2779 / 258.272004 / 186.1816082566 / 238.39
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume210.55162.67184.26167.87
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation10,9007088538298004888
Same as above plus superheater percentage10,9007088538211,6624888
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area36,40041,60024,84044,601
Power L156834118395011,547
Power MT261.02212.49316.66578.56

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassE-60/E-60aE-8E-9H-1/E-26H-1/E-26 compound
Locobase ID2083 12,069 11,687 2020 16,200
RailroadBuffalo & Susquehanna (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class48201182
Road Numbers123-1661211-12401200-1210250-257/1537-1544258-259/1558-1559
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built48201182
BuilderseveralBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Parry, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & Co
Year19041893189018981898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14.25 / 4.3415.17 / 4.6214 / 4.2715.25 / 4.6515.25 / 4.65
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.08 / 6.7323.17 / 7.0622.08 / 6.7323.50 / 7.1623.50 / 7.16
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.65 0.63 0.65 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)54.25 / 16.5453.42 / 16.2853.42 / 16.28
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)41,575 / 18,858
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)164,000 / 74,389121,200 / 54,975114,000 / 51,710137,895 / 62,548137,000 / 62,142
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)185,000 / 83,915134,200 / 60,872128,000 / 58,060152,895 / 69,352152,000 / 68,946
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)130,000 / 58,967104,150 / 47,24298,000 / 44,452
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)315,000 / 142,882257,045 / 116,594250,000 / 113,398
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.733500 / 13.263500 / 13.265000 / 18.945000 / 18.94
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)14 / 12.7012 / 10.9012 / 10.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)68 / 3451 / 25.5048 / 2457 / 28.5057 / 28.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)51 / 129550 / 127050 / 127056 / 142256 / 1422
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80165 / 11.40130 / 9190 / 13.10200 / 13.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)21" x 28" / 533x71121" x 26" / 533x66021" x 26" / 533x66021" x 28" / 533x71115.5" x 28" / 394x711
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26" x 28" / 660x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)41,160 / 18669.8832,162 / 14588.4625,340 / 11494.0435,611 / 16152.9030,133 / 13668.12
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.98 3.77 4.50 3.87 4.55
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)179 / 16.64186 / 17.29159 / 14.78162.14 / 15.07161.10 / 14.97
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)54.40 / 5.0632 / 2.9723.30 / 2.1732.70 / 3.0432.70 / 3.04
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2643 / 245.632042 / 189.782020 / 187.732109 / 1962096 / 194.72
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2643 / 245.632042 / 189.782020 / 187.732109 / 1962096 / 194.72
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume235.46195.91193.80187.89342.76
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation10,8805280302962136540
Same as above plus superheater percentage10,8805280302962136540
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area35,80030,69020,67030,80732,220
Power L153583921292646133148
Power MT288.11285.29226.34295.00202.63

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassH-2 compound/E-26AH/E-25H2/E-47H2a - superheatd/E47aP/ E-51
Locobase ID16,199 2019 9097 9098 2610
RailroadBaltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern (B&O)Chicago & Alton (B&O)Chicago & Alton (B&O)Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class402101018
Road Numbers260-299/1560-1599200-201420-429/450-459/2977-2986450-459/2957-2966117-126, 128-135
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built4021018
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoRhode IslandBurnham, Williams & CoC&ABrooks
Year18991890190219221894
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)15.25 / 4.6515 / 4.5715.67 / 4.7515.60 / 4.7513.33 / 4.06
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23.50 / 7.1622.62 / 6.8924.33 / 7.4224.33 / 7.4220.83 / 6.35
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.65 0.66 0.64 0.64 0.64
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)55.42 / 16.8948.67 / 14.8354.54 / 16.6254.54 / 16.6247.83 / 14.58
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)38,780 / 17,59027,175 / 12,326
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)145,030 / 65,785108,700 / 49,306182,000 / 82,554180,500 / 81,874115,000 / 52,163
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)162,580 / 73,745121,800 / 55,248200,000 / 90,719200,000 / 90,719128,000 / 58,060
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)104,650 / 47,46875,050 / 34,042143,000 / 64,864143,000 / 64,86478,000 / 35,380
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)267,230 / 121,213196,850 / 89,290343,000 / 155,583343,000 / 155,583206,000 / 93,440
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)5000 / 18.943500 / 13.267000 / 26.527000 / 26.523900 / 14.77
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)12 / 10.90 7.50 / 6.8015 / 13.6015 / 13.60 6.50 / 5.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)60 / 3045 / 22.5076 / 3875 / 37.5048 / 24
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)56 / 142251 / 129557 / 144857 / 144848 / 1219
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80160 / 11200 / 13.80200 / 13.80180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)15.5" x 28" / 394x71120" x 24" / 508x61022" x 28" / 559x71122" x 28" / 559x71118" x 26" / 457x660
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)26" x 28" / 660x711
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)30,133 / 13668.1225,600 / 11611.9840,418 / 18333.3240,418 / 18333.3226,852 / 12179.88
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.81 4.25 4.50 4.47 4.28
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)162.14 / 15.06164 / 15.24182.20 / 16.93197.80 / 18.38173.70 / 16.14
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)32.70 / 3.0425.25 / 2.3554.30 / 5.0454.30 / 5.0524 / 2.23
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2251 / 209.121924 / 178.813573 / 331.942866 / 266.361626 / 151.12
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)576 / 53.53
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2251 / 209.121924 / 178.813573 / 331.943442 / 319.891626 / 151.12
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume368.11220.47290.04232.65212.34
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6540404010,86010,8604320
Same as above plus superheater percentage6540404010,86012,7064320
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area32,42826,24036,44046,28531,266
Power L133224276691613,9414691
Power MT201.99346.90335.10681.10359.72

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
ClassV-2, V-3, V-4//E-58a,-58b,-58cV/VR/E-58bX/X-2/X-3/X-4 - saturatedX/X-2/X-3/X-4 - superheatedunknown
Locobase ID2062 4149 9480 2061 5872
RailroadBuffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh (B&O)Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh (B&O)Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh (B&O)Buffalo, Rochester, & Pittsburgh (B&O)Baltimore & Ohio (B&O)
CountryUSAUSAUSAUSAUSA
Whyte2-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-02-8-0
Number in Class15111711725
Road Numbers270-284250/285300-396300-3961241-1265
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built15111725
BuilderBurnham, Williams & CoBurnham, Williams & CoAlco-BrooksBrooksRichmond
Year19021901190219121896
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertSouthernStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)15.25 / 4.6515.25 / 4.6515.75 / 4.8015.75 / 4.8015.17 / 4.62
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23.92 / 7.2923.92 / 7.2924.50 / 7.4724.50 / 7.4723.17 / 7.06
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.64 0.65
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)52.52 / 16.0153.73 / 16.3854.50 / 16.6154.50 / 16.6151.17 / 15.60
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)155,260 / 70,425151,900 / 68,901164,600 / 74,661164,000 / 74,389134,000 / 60,781
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)174,530 / 79,166169,600 / 76,929184,600 / 83,733184,000 / 83,461145,300 / 65,907
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)120,470 / 54,644120,000 / 54,431
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)295,000 / 133,810289,600 / 131,360
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)6000 / 22.736000 / 22.736000 / 22.735000 / 18.943500 / 13.26
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / ML/MT)10 / 9.1012 / 10.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)65 / 32.5063 / 31.5069 / 34.5068 / 3456 / 28
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)56 / 142256 / 142257 / 144857 / 144850 / 1270
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80200 / 13.80165 / 11.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22" x 28" / 559x71122" x 28" / 559x71121" x 28" / 533x71121" x 28" / 533x71121" x 26" / 533x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)41,140 / 18660.8141,140 / 18660.8136,827 / 16704.4736,827 / 16704.4732,162 / 14588.46
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.77 3.69 4.47 4.45 4.17
Heating Ability
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)172 / 15.98135 / 12.55204.50 / 19.01190 / 17.66173 / 16.08
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)46.70 / 4.3433 / 3.0754.40 / 5.0654.40 / 5.0628.64 / 2.66
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2797 / 259.852585 / 240.242877 / 267.382392 / 222.301952 / 181.41
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)461 / 42.84
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2797 / 259.852585 / 240.242877 / 267.382853 / 265.141952 / 181.41
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume227.05209.84256.31213.10187.28
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation9340660010,88010,8804726
Same as above plus superheater percentage9340660010,88012,6214726
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area34,40027,00040,90044,08028,545
Power L155414940660112,6803716
Power MT314.72286.79353.65681.82244.55

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