Santa Fe 2-10-2 "Santafe" Locomotives

The Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad bought a pair of "Decapod" type locomotives for use as pushers on the Raton Pass over the mountains to and from California. These locomotives did a good job of ascending the steep grade. After they reached the summit and were relieved from pusher duty there was no facility to turn them around. They had to back down the mountain and with their long ridged wheelbase they had difficulty negotiating the tight curves of this twisting line.

In 1903, the AT&SF asked Baldwin Locomotive Works then known as the Burnham, Williams & Co to build it several 2-10-0 locomotives with a pair of tailing wheels that could be used to guide the drivers when the locomotives were operated in reverse. With this modification to the "Decapod" type a new wheel arrangement was born and the new type of locomotive was named "Santa Fe" for the railroad that first used it.

These first "Santa Fe" types were just 2-10-2 design locomotives on a 2-10-0 frame. Locomotives on subsequent orders for this new type of locomotives would have vastly improved boilers. Because of the addition of the trailing truck a deeper and wider firebox could be placed behind the rear driving wheels instead of between them as was the case in the 2-10-0 wheel arrangement. There were eighty-six of these new type locomotives delivered to the AT&SF during 1903 and 1904. They were assigned road numbers 900 through 985. These locomotives were a tandem-compound design in which the high-pressure and low-pressure cylinders were lined up one behind the other with the high pressure chambers in the leading position. The leading two driven axles and the leading truck were equalized together; behind them, the rear 3 driven axles and the trailing truck were equalized together.

Some of the engines were delivered with fireboxes designed by two Frisco engineers - Jacobs & Shupert, which eliminated staybolts. The inside and outside shells of this firebox are each composed of a series of channel sections, which are bent to a horseshoe form. The usual stay-bolts are replaced by plates, which have openings cut in them to permit the free circulation of steam and water, and are riveted between the adjacent channels..

Although staybolts were a big maintenance headache for all railroads, the J-S alternative didn't prove much more durable. Designed to be extremely rigid, the structures worked themselves loose under the wracks and strains of the forces generated by such big locomotives. Numbers 900 through 985 as delivered had 57. diameter drivers, 19./32. x 32. cylinders, a 225 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 57314 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 287,240 pounds.

In 1916, the railroad started simpling and superheating the Class 900 and Class 1600 to a common design. Apparently they accomplished the simple-expansion makeover simply by removing the HP cylinders in front, shortening the piston rod, and bushing the LP cylinders to achieve the 28" diameter. The firebox acquired two arch tubes that contributed 13.95 sq ft to the firebox heating surface. Two were fitted with Baker valve gear; all of the others used Walschaert gear. These rebuilt locomotives had 57. diameter drivers, 28 x 32. cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 74,824 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 302,490 pounds.

Starting in 1905 and completed by 1907, the Burnham, Williams & Co. delivered seventy-four locomotives that were duplicates of the Class 900s except they were oil-fired. This group was designated as Class 1600 and was given road numbers 1600 through 1673.

The Class 900 and Class 1600 locomotives would be made simple and superheated to a common design beginning in 1916. The shops of the AT&ST accomplished the simple-expansion makeover simply by removing the HP cylinders in front, shortening the piston rod, and bushing the low pressure cylinders to achieve a 28. diameter. The firebox acquired two arch tubes that contributed 13.95 sq ft to the firebox heating surface. Two were fitted with Baker valve gear; all of the others used Walschaert gear. These rebuilt locomotives had 57. diameter drivers, 28. x 32. cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 74,824 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 302,490 pounds.

In 1912 and 1913, Baldwin delivered thirty-two simple-expansion locomotives that had 57. diameter drivers, 28. x 32. cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 74,824 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 312,060 pounds. This batch was designated as Class 2674 and assigned road numbers 1674 through 1705. Compared with previous classes the grate stayed the same, but the boiler was superheated from the start and they had 4 arch tubes that contributed 29 sq ft to the firebox heating surface.

Beginning in 1916 the Class 900 and Class 1600 locomotives were made simple and superheated to a common design beginning. The shops of the AT&ST accomplished the simple-expansion makeover simply by removing the HP cylinders in front, shortening the piston rod, and bushing the low pressure cylinders to achieve a 28. diameter. The firebox acquired two arch tubes that contributed 13.95 sq ft to the firebox heating surface. Two were fitted with Baker valve gear; all of the others used Walschaert gear. These rebuilt locomotives had 57. diameter drivers, 28. x 32. cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 74,824 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 302,490 pounds.

While converting the Class 900 and Class 1600 the AT&SF shops built two classes of new "Santa Fe" type locomotives, one class of ten were coal-fired and designated as Class 3010 with road numbers 3010 through 3019 and the other class were oil-fired and designated as Class 3020 with road numbers 3020 through 3029. These twenty engines are probably the result of disassembling the 10 2-10-10-2s that the Santa Fe tried out in 1911. The rear units had the lower numbers. The conversion was to a simple-expansion design. The twenty locomotives were built between 1915 and 1918 and they had 57. diameter drivers, 28. x 32. cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 74,824 pounds of tractive effort. The 3020s weighed 293,200 pounds and the 3030s weighed 302,490 pounds.

The final group of "Santa-Fe" locomotives on the AT&SF was a group of one hundred and forty locomotives built by Baldwin between 1919 and 1927. These locomotives were designated as Class 3800 and carried road numbers 3800 through 3828 and 3830 through 3940 (road number 3829 was assigned to a 2-10-4). They had 63" diameter drivers, 30" x 32" cylinders, a 220 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 85,485 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed 396,900 pounds when delivered.

Roster by Richard Duley

Class Qty. Road Numbers Year Built Builder Notes
900 85 900-984 1903-1904 Baldwin Number 940 is preserved. All the others scrapped between 1938 and 1956. The Topeka shops bought ten front ends from the Baldwin Locomotive Works and used ten Class 900 2-10-2s to build ten 2-10-10-2s in 1913. These 2-10-10-2s were numbered 3000-3009.
985 1 985 1904 Baldwin Number 985 scrapped in 1936.
1600 74 1600-1673 1905-1907 Baldwin Numbers 1600-1673 scrapped between 1939 and 1956.
1674 32 1674-1705 1912-1913 Baldwin Numbers 1674-1705 scrapped between 1940 and 1956.
3010 10 3010-3019 1915-1917 AT&SF Built using the rear section of AT&SF 2-10-10-2 numbers 3000-3009. Numbers 3010-3019 scrapped between 1939 and 1952.
3020 10 3020-3029 1915-1918 AT&SF lt using the front section of AT&SF6
3800 29 3800-3828 1919-1920 Baldwin Number 3829 was not used in this class it was a 2-10-4. These locomotives were delivered as follows: 29 delivered in 1919, 10 delivered in 1920, 10 delivered in 1921, 26 delivered in 1923, 15 delivered in 1924, 25 delivered in 1926 and 25 delivered in 1927. Numbers 3800-3940 scrapped by 1956.
3800 111 3830-3940 1920-1927 Baldwin Number 3829 was not used in this class it was a 2-10-4. These locomotives were delivered as follows: 29 delivered in 1919, 10 delivered in 1920, 10 delivered in 1921, 26 delivered in 1923, 15 delivered in 1924, 25 delivered in 1926 and 25 delivered in 1927. Numbers 3800-3940 scrapped by 1956.

Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1600 (Locobase 11184)

Data from table in July 1904 AERJ. Data from AT&SF 7 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

The 1600s were built in 1905-1907 and had works numbers as follows:

1905

July 26073, 26085, 26086, 26111, 26117

August 26152, 26166, 26183, 26229, 26252, 26259, 26291-26292, 26313, 26326, 26344, 26351-

26352

September 26386-26387, 26443, 26450, 26459-26460, 26472, 26490, 26499

October 26528-26529, 26554, 26582

November 26761, 26847, 26854, 26873, 26920, 26935, 26949

December 27046-27047

1906

March 27636-27637, 27705, 27712, 27745, 27763, 27795, 27807, 27830

April 27863, 28021, 28032

May 28273, 28280

June 28433, 28497

December 29647, 29694-29695, 29728, 29751-29752, 29781-29782, 29819, 29841-29842, 29886

1907

January 29982, 30012, 30034-30036; February 30151

This class was nearly identical to the 900s shown in Locobase 463, but burned oil and put about a ton more weight on the drivers. According to the Topeka State Journal of 4 Feb 1907, preserved in the clippingRaildata collection offered by Frank Ellington on http://atsf.railfan.net/snippets/locomotives.html (visited 23 July 2004), "The firebox contains clay balls about 10 inches in diameter. The oil is turned among these and lighted. The clay balls become intensely hot, giving a much more even heat than coal. "

Locobase had not heard of this aid to combustion, and cannot pin it down further.

All were later rebuilt as two-cylinder simples with 28 x 32-in cylinder dimensions, reduced boiler pressure (to 200 lb psi), and a resulting tractive effort of 74,800 lb See Locobase 8256.

Notice that Locobase 8249 shows a set of Mikados delivered at the same with a 4-cylinder-in-plane layout that shared many components with this set of Santa Fes. It's not clear who borrowed from whom, but the Mike's boiler had 62 more small tubes than did these SFs, which were delivered in much greater quantity.


Class 1674 (Locobase 8275)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were:

1912

June 37955-37958, 37976-37980; July 38059-38063; August 38133-38136, 38190-38191

1913

March 39432-39436, 39505-39510

Soon after the Santa Fe took delivery of its tandem-compound 1600-class 2-10-2s, it procured these simple-expansion engine. The grate stayed the same, but the boiler was superheated from the start. As delivered, they had 4 arch tubes that contributed 29 sq ft to the firebox heating surface.

Locobase doesn't know what changes might have been made to these locomotives, but does note that the last wasn't retired until 1956.


Class 3010 (Locobase 5389)

Data from table in May 1916 RME. Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

These twenty engines are probably the result of disassembling the 10 2-10-10-2s that the Santa Fe tried out in 1911 (Locobase 418). The rear units had the lower numbers. Note that the conversion was to a simple-expansion design. In their new guise, the daughter engines gave decades more service. Retirements began in 1939-1940 and continued until 1950.


Class 3020 (Locobase 70)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Rebuilds of tandem compounds. 3020 burned oil and her tender carried 3,160 gallons of oil. She also had 4 Nicholson arch tubes that contributed 27 sq ft to the firebox heating surface. 3020 apparently was renumbered 3291.


Class 3800 (Locobase 71)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. All of Drawing Room Specification Book Number 61 of the DeGolyer Library's BaldwinRaildata collection is devoted to Santa Fe locomotive orders in the late 19teens and 1920s. The 3800 class specs run from page 339 to 366; see also Vol 70, pp. 19+. See also "Three Types of Locomotives for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway System," Railway & Locomotive Engineering, (December 1919), pp. 363-365.

Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Also see "Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe steam engine diagrams and blueprints," Kansas Memory, a website of the Kansas Historical Society, diagram at http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/221763, last accessed 24 August 2012 for the variety of tube & flue layouts to be found in this class over the years.

Works numbers spanned eight years. The first 76 included:

1919

April 51754-51755; June 51892-51895, 51927-51930, 51952-51953, 51963, 51984-51985; July 52006-52009, 52048-52050, 52069-52071, 52094, 52116-52118

1920

August 53595, 53615; September 3684, 53751-53753; October 53828, 53868; November 53936, 54072

1921

July 54923-54925; August 54938-54943; September 55000

1923

May 56504, 56512, 56566-56570; July 56717-56722; August 56837-56844, 56896, 56995-56998

Boiler had an Elesco H-5 feed water heater and the firebox heating surface included 112 sq ft (10.4 sq m) of combustion chamber and 37 sq ft (3.45 sq m) of arch tubes; see Locobase 8263 for the later version that had a slightly modified boiler. Drury (1993) says these were the first Santa Fe Santa Fes that were not "essentially turn-of-the-century Decapods with trailing axles ..." Instead, they were derived from the contemporaneous 3160-class Mikados (Locobase 5499). Piston valves measured 15" (381 mm) in diameter.

According to Steve Glischinski (Santa Fe Railway (Osceola, Wisc: MBI Publishing Company, 1997), p. 100), at first, the engines presented "maintenance headaches and had to be rebuilt, after which they went on to provide many years of reliable service for their namesake road." A 2 November 1924 note found after page 80 in Volume 70 from Santa Fe's Motive Power Department concerns an oversight on Eddystone's part. Investigating why a firebox door seam rivet in 3805 blew out and slightly injured a crew man, the shops found several more that were either broken in two or nearly so. When they determined that the rivet was made of steel, Santa Fe's engineers were clearly furious:

"I wish to call your attention to the fact that specifications ...specify the use of burden iron rivets in all firebox seams except the mud ring." After establishing that the firebox had not been repaired since the locomotive's delivery, H H Lanning said that it was "practically certain that the steel rivets which failed were applied at your works."

Lanning broke the paragraph to set apart his conclusion: "It should be distinctly understood that all rivets, except mud ring rivets, used in the construction of locomotive fireboxes built for the Santa Fe, are to be of burden iron, and that steel rivets are not to be used under any circumstances." [Locobase note: it was an error in the type of rivets used to fastern her hull plates to the frames that played a major material role in the loss of RMS Titanic.]

A few of the 3800s were retrofitted with thermic syphons in a program that saw 22 1/2 sq ft (2.1 sq m) of arch tubes removed and 106.5 sq ft of thermic syphons (9.9 sq ft) installed. Firebox heating surface area blossomed to 501 sq ft (46.5 sq m). 3874-3875 were so modified (or perhaps delivered in that configuration) as were some of the earlier engines.

One was delivered as a 2-10-4; see Locobase 8262.

As late as 1950, 132 of these very satisfactory freighters remained in service and an even 100 in 1953. But by 1956, all had been retired.


Class 3876 (Locobase 8283)

Data from AT&SF 9 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. See also Degolyer, Vol 70, pp. 140-315 and "Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe steam engine diagrams and blueprints," Kansas Memory, a website of the Kansas Historical Society, diagram at http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/221763 , last accessed 24 August 2012 for the variety of tube & flue layouts to be found in this class over the years.

Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (accessed 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema. Works numbers were:

1924

April 57761-57765; June 57822-57825, 57830-57835

1926

May 59246-59253, 59286-59292; July 59315-59316, 59338, 59344-59348; August 59396-59397

1927

January 59763-59764, 59779-59781; February 59826-59835, 59908-59910; April 59938-59944

Beginning with the 1923 locomotives, the 3800-class Santa Fe boiler lost twenty small tubes in favor of four more large flues. Firebox heating surface still included 112 sq ft (10.4 sq m) of combustion chamber and 41 sq ft (3.8 sq m) of arch tubes and the piston-valve diameter was still 15". Some were oil-burners, others coal.


Class 900 (Locobase 463)

Data from table in July 1904 AERJ. Data from AT&SF 7 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

915-984 and 900-914 had works numbers show the class came in single numbers except for two pairs. The actual numbers were

1903

September 22782, 22793, 22819, 22838, 22851, 22862, 22884-22885

October 22928, 22951, 22958, 22977, 23000, 23009, 23040, 23047, 23087, 23112

November 23135, 23149, 23167, 23173, 23190, 23196, 23234, 23237, 23243, 23259, 23279

December 23287, 23293, 23303, 23318, 23342, 23374, 23393, 23424-23425, 23455, 23468

1904

January 23506, 23515, 23522, 23546, 23585, 23608, 23614, 23637, 23644, 23659

February 23679, 23691, 23708, 23724, 23730, 23740, 23753, 23764, 23787, 23798, 23803

March 23822, 23833, 23845, 23900, 23910-23911, 23959-23960, 23978

This was a tandem-compound design in which the high-pressure and low-pressure cylinders were lined up one behind the other (HP leading). The class introduced the idea of a "Santa Fe" wheel arrangement that was adopted by several railroads for drag-freight service. The leading two driven axles and the pony truck were equalized together; behind them, the rear 3 driven axles and the trailing truck were equalized together.

Some of the engines were delivered with fireboxes designed by two Frisco engineers - Jacobs & Shupert -- that eliminated staybolts. Baldwin's 1912 description stands as well as any to outline its differences from a typical firebox: "The inside and outside shells of this firebox are each composed of a series of channel sections, which are bent to a horseshoe form. The usual stay-bolts are replaced by plates, which have openings cut in them to permit the free circulation of steam and water, and are riveted between the adjacent channels."

Although staybolts were a big maintenance headache for all railroads, the J-S alternative didn't prove much more durable. Designed to be extremely rigid, the structures worked themselves loose under the wracks and strains of the forces generated by such big locomotives.

The 1600s were built in 1905-1907 and were virtually identical; see Locobase 11184.


Class 900/1600 - superheated (Locobase 8256)

Data from AT&SF 7 -1920 locomotive diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive Raildata collection. Information about how many, when, and by whom this class was supplied from http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfstea.html (also visited 6 Feb 2006), the Santa Fe All-Time Steam Roster maintained by Evan Werkema.

Locobase 463 shows the original tandem-compound design in which the high-pressure and low-pressure cylinders were lined up one behind the other (HP leading). 900s were delivered as coal burners, 1600s as oil burners.

In 1916, the railroad started simpling and superheating these two classes to a common design. Apparently they accomplished the simple-expansion makeover simply by removing the HP cylinders in front, shortening the piston rod, and bushing the LP cylinders to achieve the 28" diameter. The firebox acquired two arch tubes that contributed 13.95 sq ft to the firebox heating surface. Two were fitted with Baker valve gear; all of the others used Walschaert gear.

The 1600s were heavier, but otherwise the two classes were identical.

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class 1600 1674 3010 3020 3800
Locobase ID 11184 8275 5389 70 71
Railroad Santa Fe (ATSF) Santa Fe (ATSF) Santa Fe (ATSF) Santa Fe (ATSF) Santa Fe (ATSF)
Country USA USA USA USA USA
Whyte 2-10-2 2-10-2 2-10-2 2-10-2 2-10-2
Road Numbers 1600-1673 1674-1705 3010-3019 3020-3029 3800-3975
Gauge Std Std Std Std Std
Builder Burnham, Williams & Co Baldwin Santa Fe Santa Fe Baldwin
Year 1905 1912 1915 1918 1919
Valve Gear Stephenson Walschaert Walschaert Walschaert Walschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 22'
Engine Wheelbase 35.92' 35.83' 35.92' 35.90' 41.10'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.55 0.55 0.55 0.55 0.54
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) 66' 66.52' 66.33' 70.40' 85.51'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) 53060 lbs 56510 lbs 51400 lbs 65370 lbs
Weight on Drivers 234580 lbs 258420 lbs 248900 lbs 248900 lbs 309000 lbs
Engine Weight 287240 lbs 312060 lbs 296700 lbs 295300 lbs 396600 lbs
Tender Light Weight 158500 lbs 185400 lbs 185400 lbs 212800 lbs 298600 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight 445740 lbs 497460 lbs 482100 lbs 508100 lbs 695200 lbs
Tender Water Capacity 7000 gals 9000 gals 9000 gals 10000 gals 15000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) 14 tons 14 tons 12 tons 3300 gals 5000 gals
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) 78 lb/yard 86 lb/yard 83 lb/yard 83 lb/yard 103 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter 57" 57" 57" 57" 63"
Boiler Pressure 225 psi 200 psi 200 psi 200 psi 220 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) 19" x 32" 28" x 32" 28" x 32" 28" x 32" 30" x 32"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) 32" x 32" (2)
Tractive Effort 57314 lbs 74824 lbs 74824 lbs 74824 lbs 85486 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.09 3.45 3.33 3.33 3.61
Heating Ability
Firebox Area 209 sq. ft 239 sq. ft 294.50 sq. ft 256 sq. ft 417 sq. ft
Grate Area 58.50 sq. ft 58.50 sq. ft 58.50 sq. ft 58.50 sq. ft 88.30 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface 4796 sq. ft 4411 sq. ft 4042 sq. ft 3640 sq. ft 5328 sq. ft
Superheating Surface 877 sq. ft 737 sq. ft 950 sq. ft 1298 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface 4796 sq. ft 5288 sq. ft 4779 sq. ft 4590 sq. ft 6626 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume 456.72 193.42 177.24 159.61 203.51
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation 13163 11700 11700 11700 19426
Same as above plus superheater percentage 13163 13689 13455 14157 23311
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area 47025 55926 67735 61952 110088
Power L1 4191 11246 10120 11222 16849
Power MT 196.94 479.71 448.19 496.99 601.06

Specifications by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media
Class 3876 900 900/1600 - superheated
Locobase ID 8283 463 8256
Railroad Santa Fe (ATSF) Santa Fe (ATSF) Santa Fe (ATSF)
Country USA USA USA
Whyte 2-10-2 2-10-2 2-10-2
Road Numbers 3876-3940 900-984 900-984, 1600-1673
Gauge Std Std Std
Builder Santa Fe Burnham, Williams & Co Santa Fe
Year 1924 1903 1916
Valve Gear Walschaert Stephenson Walschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase 22' 19.75' 19.75'
Engine Wheelbase 41.10' 35.92' 35.83'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.54 0.55 0.55
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) 92.77' 66' 68.04'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) 65440 lbs 53060 lbs 55810 lbs
Weight on Drivers 314500 lbs 234580 lbs 251250 lbs
Engine Weight 405100 lbs 287240 lbs 302490 lbs
Tender Light Weight 375900 lbs 158500 lbs 179000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight 781000 lbs 445740 lbs 481490 lbs
Tender Water Capacity 20000 gals 7000 gals 7000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) 27 tons 14 tons 14 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) 105 lb/yard 78 lb/yard 84 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter 63" 57" 57"
Boiler Pressure 220 psi 225 psi 200 psi
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) 30" x 32" 19" x 32" 28" x 32"
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) 32" x 32" (2)
Tractive Effort 85486 lbs 57314 lbs 74824 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.68 4.09 3.36
Heating Ability
Firebox Area 417 sq. ft 209 sq. ft 222.95 sq. ft
Grate Area 88.30 sq. ft 58.50 sq. ft 58.50 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface 5087 sq. ft 4796 sq. ft 4055 sq. ft
Superheating Surface 1345 sq. ft 1008 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface 6432 sq. ft 4796 sq. ft 5063 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume 194.31 456.72 177.81
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation 19426 13163 11700
Same as above plus superheater percentage 23505 13163 14040
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area 111005 47025 53508
Power L1 17009 4191 11865
Power MT 596.16 196.94 520.55

Photos

Reference


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