FC del Sud de Buenos Aires 2-6-2 Locomotives in Argentina


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 8A (Locobase 3733)

Data provided by Carlos Alberto Fern+ndez Priotti in Bryan Attewell ([] Steam Locomotive simulator program (April 2000). D S Purdom, British Team on the Pampas (London and New York: Mechanical Engineering Publications, Ltd:, 1977), pp. 42-43. Works numbers were 17124-17145, 17285-17296 in 1906.

Dennis Purdom stated that this relatively large tank engine order may been originally intended for India, but was diverted to Argentina, "but it has been impossible to trace any official record of this." Many years later, Locobase was able to combine an NBLC catalogue entry with a production list to determine some of the works numbers.

The engines presented a very British sight with cylinders outside and below the running board, inside valves, black smokebox and short stack, Belapaire firebox and roofed cab with large, windowless openings. The rear two axles of the coupled trio flanked the grate front and rear and leading and trailing trucks balanced the profile.

He contended that the class was "a remarkably good investment for the railway, being real maids of all work and able to perform efficiently every possible job within their rather limited fuel and water capacity."

They even proved able to take up the slack in the "intense" Buenos Aires suburban-service motive power shortage for several years from 1924.


Class 8B (Locobase 4298)

Data from Carlos Alberto Fern+ndez Priotti in Bryan Attewell ([] Steam Locomotive simulator program (December 2000) and from "James Nasmyth's Centenary," The Locomotive Magazine, Vol XIV (15 December 1908), p. 209-211. See also D S Purdom, British Team on the Pampas (London and New York: Mechanical Engineering Publications, Ltd:, 1977), pp. 43-44.

Switchers.


Class 8C (Locobase 4299)

Data from Carlos Alberto Fern+ndez Priotti in Bryan Attewell ([] Steam Locomotive simulator program (December 2000); and "Superheater Tank Locomotive, Buenos Ayres Great Southern Ry", Locomotive Magazine, Volume XXV [25] (14 June 1919), p. 86; D S Purdom, British Team on the Pampas (London and New York: Mechanical Engineering Publications, Ltd:, 1977), pp. 44-45. Robert Stephenson & Company produced the first ten in 1913 (works numbers were 3471-3480). North British Locomotive followed with 31 more (works numbers 20186-20216 in 1913-1914).

Oil-burning suburban passenger tanks. They had inside admission piston valves.

LM's report noted the virtues of the 2-6-2 arrangement as applied to tank engines. Setting three driven axles between a swivelling truck at each end "gives at once ample adhesion weight and full flexibility" while being "decidedly cheaper in first cost" than a 4-6-2 or a 4-6-4 locomotive as well as being "economical of weight that is useless for adhesion."

Purdom wrote that these were the tank version of the class 7D 2-6-0 tender engines. On their arrival, he continued, "They at once took over the bulk of the Buenos Aires suburban services including the longer runs unsuitable for the class 8A due to the restricted fuel capacity of the latter."

Most operated in the Buenos Aires suburbs, but a few were delivered to Bahia Blanca and the city of Tandil.


Class 8DN (Locobase 4301)

Data from Carlos Alberto Fern+ndez Priotti in Bryan Attewell ([] Steam Locomotive simulator program (December 2000). Beyer, Peacock works numbers 6246-6260 in 1925 and North British Locomotive Company works numbers werer 23156-23170 in 1925.

-Superheated repeats of the 8DVs a dozen years later. Also used for switching (shunting) duties.


Class 8DV (Locobase 4300)

Data from Carlos Alberto Fernandez Priotti in Bryan Attewell ([] Steam Locomotive simulator program (December 2000). See also Douglas S Purdom, British Steam on the Pampas (London: Mechanical Engineering Publications, Ltd, 1977), pp. 46-47

Essentially the same as the 8C suburban passenger tanks supplied by Stephenson in the same period, but used for switching and consequently having no superheater, smaller drivers, and less water and fuel.

The Spanish-language website members.es.tripod.de/rielsud/locoayer.html (Dec 2001| quotes the last Chief Mechanic of the Sud, Douglas Purdom, as noting that throughout their working lives, these engines would leave their home shed on Sunday for Kilo 5 -- their main working area -- and not return until the following Saturday. During that week they'd be in steam continuously and pause only to have water and oil refilled.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class8A8B8C8DN8DV
Locobase ID3733 4298 4299 4301 4300
RailroadFC del Sud de Buenos Aires (FCS)FC del Sud de Buenos Aires (FCS)FC del Sud de Buenos Aires (FCS)FC del Sud de Buenos Aires (FCS)FC del Sud de Buenos Aires (FCS)
CountryArgentinaArgentinaArgentinaArgentinaArgentina
Whyte2-6-2T2-6-2T2-6-2T2-6-2T2-6-2T
Number in Class3410413040
Road Numbers394-415, 456-467/3321-33543401-34103451-34913150-31793501-3510, 3150-3179
Gauge5'6"5'6"5'6"5'6"5'6"
Number Built3410413040
BuilderNorth BritishNasmyth WilsonseveralseveralRobert Stephenson & Co
Year19061908191319261914
Valve GearStephensonWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)14 / 4.2712.83 / 3.9113 / 3.96
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)30.17 / 9.2027.75 / 8.4630.42 / 9.27
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.46 0.46 0.43
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)30.17 / 9.2027.75 / 8.4630.42 / 9.27
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)36,960
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)109,648 / 49,736102,592 / 46,535110,209 / 49,990112,672 / 51,107110,208 / 49,990
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)165,200 / 74,934137,340 / 62,296152,200 / 69,037
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)165,200 / 74,934137,340 / 62,296152,200 / 69,037
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)1440 / 5.451200 / 4.552400 / 9.091800 / 6.821800 / 6.82
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 3.10 / 2.80 6.90 / 6.303 / 33 / 2.70
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)61 / 30.5057 / 28.5061 / 30.5063 / 31.5061 / 30.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)62 / 157552 / 132168 / 172755.50 / 141055.50 / 1410
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40184.20 / 12.70160 / 11152.30 / 10.50152.30 / 10.50
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 26" / 457x66017" x 24" / 432x610 (3)19" x 26" / 483x66019" x 26" / 483x66019" x 26" / 483x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)20,788 / 9429.2931,326 / 14209.2518,772 / 8514.8521,893 / 9930.5121,893 / 9930.51
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.27 3.27 5.87 5.15 5.03
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)11 / 3.3510.70 / 3.2610.70 / 3.2610.70 / 3.2610.70 / 3.26
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)148 / 13.7599 / 9.20
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)27 / 2.5120 / 1.8621.96 / 2.0422 / 2.0422 / 2.04
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1660 / 154.221245 / 115.661153 / 107.121153 / 107.161386 / 128.76
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)242 / 22.48242 / 22.49
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1660 / 154.221245 / 115.661395 / 129.601395 / 129.651386 / 128.76
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume216.78131.64135.14135.14162.45
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation48603684351433513351
Same as above plus superheater percentage48603684411139203351
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area26,64018,236
Power L158292937
Power MT351.60189.34

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