kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB 0-10-0 Locomotives in Austria


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 180 500 (Locobase 10625)

Maurice Demoulin, Locomotive Actuelle ... (Paris: Librairie Polytechnique Ch.Beranger, 1906), p 258, See also Gustav Reder (Michael Reynolds, trans), The world of steam locomotives (New York: Putnam, 1974), pl. 233, and Wikipedia [], last accessed 9 February 2008.

Locobases 1215 and 9186 describe the production versions of this class of mountain helper engines. In 1907, Karl Gÿlsdorf produced this quartet, which was fitted with a proper Schmidt superheater at the usual cost of some amount of total evaporative heating surface. Apparently, Gÿlsdorf did not continue adding superheaters to these all-adhesion locomotives.


Class 180 95 (Locobase 9186)

Data from Dr. R. Sanzin, "Die Lokomotiven auf der Intertionalen Austellung in Mailand 1906, 29.. 5/5 gekuppeltezweizylindrige Verbund-Guterszuglokomotive der oesterreichischen Staatsbahnen ...", Zeitschrift des Oesterreichischen Ingenieur- und Architeckten-Vereines Nr. 10 (9 March1907), p. 169-170. Wikipedia [], last accessed 5 July 2009 and "New Decapods, Austrian State Rys", The Locomotive Magazine, Vol XIII (14 September 1907), p. 164.

Karl Gÿlsdorf built hundreds of these sloggers to handle the increase in coal traffic over the Prague-Dux and other northern Bohemian lines; see Locobase 1215 for the first group and 10625 for the experiments in superheating.. As might be expected, there were several variants, of which the most numerous version was the one in this entry. Even its numbers divided into 110 with the heating surface shown in the specs and a latter group (505-557) that had 10 sq ft more in the tubes (190.3 sq m vs 190 sq m). The firebox had 1 sq m less direct heating surface than the first batches.


Class 180/523.0 (Locobase 1215)

Data from Maurice Demoulin, Locomotive Actuelle ... (Paris: Librairie Polytechnique Ch.Beranger, 1906), p 258; See also Gustav Reder (Michael Reynolds, trans), The World of Steam Locomotives (New York: Putnam, 1974), pl. 233; and Wikipedia [], last accessed 9 February 2008.

These Karl Golsdorf freight engines were designed to work on rail having an axle loading of less than 30,000 lb (13,608 kg) . They were definitely freight crawlers, a typical performance involvined pulling a 190-ton train up a 3.7% grade at 9.3 mph (15 kph) and developing 970 indicated horsepower. (Reder also notes a trial run in which the 180 pulled 700 tons up a 1% grade; this represents substantial power for the time.) They had the typical Golsdorf double dome joined by an external steam pipe and a broad cabbage stack with spark arrester.

Demoulin notes that, "...thanks to a play of 28 mm given to the outside axles (essiuex extremes), this machine was able to negotiate (s'inscrire) curves of 180 meters [radius]".

Reder says that although the 180 was originally meant for the coal traffic in Bohemia, Alpine lines also adopted the type. By 1910, the State Railway had procured 239 while the Sudbahn had bought 27 more. See Locobases 9586 and 10625 for other variants.

After World War One, the newly minted Czechoslovakia received 105 Class 180s dubbed 523.0; 50 of these were . The Italian State Railways were awarded the 27 Sudbahn engines as well as 50 of the kKStB locomotives; they were given class ID FS 477. Poland, Romania, and Yugoslavia also received 180s that were designated TW11 (PKP), 180 (CFR), and 135 (JDZ), respectively.

The 61 that remained went to the Austrian successor BB+, which had retired all but 9 when the Nazi Anschluss occurred in 1938. At that point, the DRG designated the nonet as BR 57 001- 57 009.


Class 80.01 (Locobase 1213)

Data from Wikipedia http:// , accessed 30 June 2007 and [], also accessed 30 June 2007. See also Gustav Reder (Michael Reynolds, trans), The world of steam locomotives (New York: Putnam, 1974).

This Karl Golsdorf design for a big freight engine shows some typical features, including a quite low percentage of superheat. Tomasz Galka, author of the Polish site, explains that Golsdorf was concerned that the higher temperatures of superheated steam would require lubricants he didn't have ready access to. The first 36 locomotives were completed with piston valves on the HP cylinder but slide valves on the LP side. The latter didn't stand up well to even the moderately hotter steam. So 104 more were delivered in 1911-1915 with piston valves on both cylinders. 19 more ordered for the kKStB were delivered to Poland after World War One.

Soon after the 80s were established in Austro-Hungarian service, the Empire disintegrated in the wake of World War One. As the successor railways established themselves, each obtained some 80 0-10-0s. The CSD secured 144 engines as their Type 524.0. The Polish State Railway (PKP) redesignated its 80s. Hungary typed its 80s 520.5, Romania's CFR typed its 10 ex-80s as class 50 and bought 70 additional engines from Wiener Neustadt and StEG, and Yugoslavia's JD- placed its 25 80s in the 28 class (later redubbing them 144s) and bought 10 more from Wiener Neustadt in 1923 followed by 4 from StEG in 1929..

Many more 80s were completed with two single-expansion cylinders; see Locobase 8528.


Class 80.600/900 (Locobase 8528)

Data from Wikipedia [], accessed 30 June 2007 (last accessed 17 January 2023) and [], also accessed 30 June 2007. See also Gustav Reder (Michael Reynolds, trans), The World of Steam Locomotives (New York: Putnam, 1974). Wiener Neustadt 5552-5556

Although the design first saw service as a cross-compound (Locobase , the 80 class would be built in much greater numbers as a two-cylinder simple engine.

In addition to the kKStB's 208 locomotives completed before the end of World War One, there were:

60 CSD 524.0 built by PCM (once the Brohmi Maris) - 8 - and 52 from Breitfeld-Danek.

50 Greek Kb engines (road #811-860) delivered by StEG in 1924 (works #4601-4610) and 1926 (4621-4655 & 4746-4750).

Poland's order of 132 locomotives from Wiener Neustadt and StEG included 19 compounds; the rest constituted the simple-expansion variant.

70 Class 50 engines supplied by Wiener Neustadt and StEG to Romania's CFR.

10 Class 28 for the then-Railway of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croation & Slovenians (later theYugoslavian State Railways (JD-)) from Wiener Neustadt (works 5735-5744) in 1923 and 4 from StEG in 1929 (their works #4840-4843.

In Polish service, says Tomasz Galka -- compiler of the excellent website on that nation's locomotives -- the ex-Austrians spent their careers running near their former haunts. In such relatively flat terrain, the Tw12s were able exploit their good qualities: "...considerable tractive effort at moderate axle load and ability to negotiate tight curves could be used to the full extent. Maximum speed of only 50 km/h [31 mph] was not a great disadvantage for such duties."

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Middle Run Media

Class180 500180 95180/523.080.0180.600/900
Locobase ID10625 9186 1215 1213 8528
Railroadkaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)
CountryAustriaAustriaAustriaAustriaAustria
Whyte0-10-00-10-00-10-00-10-00-10-0
Number in Class416694159515
Road Numbers180.500-503180 95 - 181, 505-557180 0.. 180 94/523.001-523.10580.01-36, 100-20380.600-602, 603-604/900-999,1900-1999,2901-2911+
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built416694159515
BuilderAustriaAustriaAustriaAustriaAustria
Year19061908190019091909
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)18.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.60
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)18.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.6018.37 / 5.60
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase11111
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)41.17 / 12.5541.16 / 12.5541.16 / 12.5541.17 / 12.5541.17 / 12.55
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)31,085 / 14,10031,085 / 14,100
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)146,607 / 66,500146,607 / 66,500144,844 / 65,700153,001 / 69,400153,001 / 69,400
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)146,607 / 66,500146,607 / 66,500144,844 / 65,700153,001 / 69,400153,001 / 69,400
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)78,264 / 35,500
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)224,871 / 102,000
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3749 / 14.20
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 7.70 / 7
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)49 / 24.5049 / 24.5048 / 2451 / 25.5051 / 25.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)49.50 / 125751.20 / 130049.50 / 125749.50 / 125751.20 / 1258
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)198.70 / 13.70198.70 / 13.70184.20 / 12.70203.10 / 14203.10 / 14
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)22.05" x 24.8" / 560x630 (1)22.05" x 24.88" / 560x632 (1)22.05" x 24.8" / 560x630 (1)23.27" x 24.8" / 590x630 (1)23.23" x 24.8" / 590x632
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)33.46" x 24.8" / 850x630 (1)33.46" x 24.88" / 850x632 (1)33.46" x 24.8" / 850x630 (1)33.46" x 24.8" / 850x630 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)28,685 / 13011.3127,822 / 12619.8626,591 / 12061.4931,567 / 14318.5745,124 / 20467.93
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.11 5.27 5.45 4.85 3.39
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm) - 2.008" / 51264 - 2.008" / 51264 - 2.008" / 51148 - 2" /
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)22 - 5" / 0
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)14.76 / 4.5014.76 / 4.5014.76 / 4.50 4.86 / 1.4813.94 / 4.25
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)129.12 / 12143.16 / 13.30139.93 / 13129.12 / 12129.12 / 12
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)36.80 / 3.4236.81 / 3.4232.29 / 336.80 / 3.4236.80 / 3.42
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1447 / 134.502188 / 203.302185 / 2032174 / 2022048 / 190.30
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)592 / 55288 / 26.80334 / 26.80
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)2039 / 189.502188 / 203.302185 / 2032462 / 228.802382 / 217.10
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume264.03397.95398.69356.18168.35
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation73127314594874747474
Same as above plus superheater percentage94337314594883718520
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area33,09628,44625,77529,37129,896
Power L196393889347471858120
Power MT724.74292.41264.38517.65585.01

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