KKSTB: Bohmische Westbahn / B~hmische Nordbahn / Eisenbahn Pilsen-Priesen(-Komotau / Kaiserin Elisabeth-Bahn / Oesterreichische Nordwestbahn / StEG / kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB 0-8-0 Locomotives in Austria


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 174.03 (Locobase 8517)

Data from [], data accessed 24 June 2007

Although the railway experimented with Brotan-boilered locomotives in 1906-1908 and also procured 13 with staybolt boilers and the Clench steam drier, the kKStB found that the unusual vessel of the one and the primitive superheater of the latter did not live up to expectations. So they procured these standard saturated-boiler locomotives from Floridsdorf, Bohmisch Mahri, Wiener Neustadt, & StEG.

The specs show that the design's rigid wheelbase measured 2.55 m (8 ft 4 1/2"), which suggests that one of the two end axles had a great deal of lateral play.

After World War One caused the breakup of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, this class, like all others, was doled out to its newly formed constituent republics. Czechoslovakia's 12 class 414.2 lasted the longest, retiring ultimately in 1969. Poland's State Railways operated 18 as their class Tp17 and the successor BB+ retained 13. German possession of Austria in 1938 and Poland in 1939 led to the combined set of engines being grouped as 55 5901 to 55 5931.

The +BB, successor to the BB+, redesignated the 11 survivors of World War Two class 155 and operated them until 1959.


Class 174.511 (Locobase 8518)

Data from [], data accessed 24 June 2007

As noted in Locobase 8517, the kKStB bought these staybolted boiler locomotives with the Clench steam drier soon after sampling the Brotan boiler. The Clench system did not actually provide much benefit and the class was soon converted to saturated-boiler locomotives similar to the 174.03s. Locobase isn't sure what to make of the rebuilt locomotives' boiler dimensions, which show a larger heating surface and a larger superheater,so that data isn't included.


Class 51 / 71 (Locobase 4649)

Data from [], last accessed 30 August 2006..

Floridsdorf supplied the first six of these 8-coupleds in 1876 with Wiener Neustadt adding in 1881. They were a response to increased freight traffic on hilly profiles.

In 1888 the class received a new boiler and it is this modified engine that is described in the specifications. The photo accompanying the Wikipedia entry on this class shows the flared, spark-arresting "cabbage-stack", a continuous, undulating splasher over all four drivers, small steam dome over the lead driving axle, cubic sandbox over the second axle.

After World War One, the CSD received six of the eight as their class 401.1 and Poland took the other two. The last Czech machine didn't retire until 1950.


Class B III / 70 (Locobase 4648)

Data from [], last accessed 24 June 2007. Fixed wheelbase of 2.397 m (7 ft 10") shows that one of the end axles had significant radial travel; Locobase suspects the last one.

Data on origins from Josef Pospichal's Lokstatistic site -- [], last accessed 2 August 2006. Pospichal shows that Hartmann delivered the first set (works# 642-650) in 1873, Sigl the next 6 (works# 2231-2236) in 1875, and Floridsdorf the last 9 (works# 190-198) in that same year. Like many other Austrian locomotives of the day, all of the class had names; respectively they were: Lietzen, Radstadt, Tauern, Werfen, Lofer, Zell, Lend, Abtenau, Wÿrgl, Glockner, Venediger, Watzmann, Nassfeld, Pasterze, Salve, Staufen, Pinzgau, Pongau, Malnitz, Bÿckstein, Gerlos, Rauris, Mittersill, and Unken.

All survived to be reclassified twice by the kKStB. Nine went to the Ukraine in 1919 Most of these and several others went on to equip the Polish State Railway while a few operated in Czechoslovakia.


Class BF IV/73 (Locobase 1211)

Data from [], accessed 30 June 2007, which supplemented Gustav Reder (Michael Reynolds, trans), The world of steam locomotives (New York: Putnam, 1974). See also the Slovenia Railway Museum website -- [] (first accessed March 2002, last accessed 29 December 2019). (Thanks to Alexander Blessing for his 25 December 2019 email noting the correct valve gear.)

According to Josef Pospichal at [] (last accessed 29 December 2019), the class was produced by Floridsdorf (194 in 1885-1909), StEG (119 in 1886-1906), Wiener Neustadt (86 in 1885-1908), BMMF (37 in 1900-1909), and Krauss Linz (17 in 1885-1892).

The final form of the Series 35 engines developed for the Austrian Sudbahn in the 1870s. The last axle's lateral play reduced the rigid wheelbase to 2.55 m (8 ft 4 1/2").

Information from the Slovenia Railway Museum website -- [] (March 2002) -- notes that this is one of three locomotive classes developed by the kkStB as standard engine. It was a true artifact of its time, with plate frame, outside leaf springing over the axle, a large,angular sandbox behind the tall steam dome, which lay just behind the big, spark-arresting stack.

This inside-valve, low-drivered eight-coupled was "extraordinary powerful, yet simple and reliable." Production continued until 1909. The website also notes that 145 of this class were converted to oil burning using James Holden's oil-firing system.

Reder comments: "The engine crews and maintenance men were especially keen on this engine because of its uphill performance and its solid simplicity." Tests on the Arlberg Railroad yielded 180-200 tons up a 2.5% grade at 6-7.5 mph and 500 tons at 9.5 mph up a 1% grade.

Given its great numbers, the class contributed signficantly to establishing the locomotive holdings of the new state railways established after the demise of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the end of World War One. The largest stud consisted of the 233 Tp15s of the Polish State Railway (PKP). The Czech CSD classed its 119 as 414.0, Romania's CFR took 17 73s, and Yugoslavia's JD- classed its 4 as Type 133. Italy enjoyed the bounty of 25 Gruppo 424 as war reparations. Of the remaining 55, 10 had been lost in the Great War and the kKStB's successor BBO retained 44 class 73s.

As the Deutsche Reichsbahn followed the flag into Central Europe beginning with the 1938 Anschluss with Austria, it took in the 44 from Austria, 76 from Czechoslovakia (1938-1939), 63 from Poland (1939), and 1 of the JDZ engines (1941). Most took Baureihe 55 57-58 (55 5701 - 58 5819, 55 5832-5865) but a Polish batch were classed 735566-5597.

Thirty-eight survivors operated on the OBB as the 55 class until the last was retired in 1964.


Class Cv (Locobase 8079)

Data from [] and [], both accessed 13 January 2007.

Krauss Linz delivered two sets of 2 engines to the Bukowinaer Lokal bahn (JANOSZ and GRIGORCEA, works #5790-5791 in 1908) and the "Neue" Bukowinaer Lokalbahn (no names, works #6521-6522 in 1912). The design featured tiny drivers, an inversely tapered spark-arresting stack, long side tanks, dome well forward, and an odd cage around the safety-valve stand ahead of the cab.

The big difference between the two pairs was higher weights in the later engines. NB: the heating surface areas are specifically mentioned as representing the water side of the tubes, as in North American and British practice.

The breakup of the Austro-Hungarian empire in 1918-1919 led to a rebranding for all of them because of shifting borders. The Bukowianer Lokalbahn site now fell under Ukrainian control as Stryj and the first two remained with that LB. The older of the two eventually moved as far east as Irkutsk.

The second two were taken over by the Polish PKP and redesignated Tx-2 (1243-1244). A brief stint as Nazi German DRG BauReihe 99-2561-2562 interrupted their Polish identity. After World War II, both were sole in 1955 to industrial firms, which retained them until 1968 and 1966, respectively.


Class IVd / 178/BR 92.2211/OBB 92 (Locobase 1212)

Data from [] (last accessed 31 August 2006), [] and [] for data (25 January 2004). See also Dr. R. Sanzin, "Die Lokomotiven auf der Intertionalen Austellung in Mailand 1906, 32. 3/3 gekuppelte Verschiebelokomotive der Italienischen Staatsbahnen ...", Zeitschrift des Oesterreichischen Ingenieur- und Architeckten-Vereines, Vol LIX, Nr. 13 (29 March 1907), p. 22. (Thanks to Alexander Blessing for his 28 April 2019 email correcting the German that Locobase had incorrectly translated as "compound".)

This large class of relatively small eight-coupled tanks were designed by Karl Golsdorf to answer the need for more powerful locomotives on light rails without resorting to rack traction. Krauss Linz delivered the first two (21 - WILLENDORF, 22 - KLAUS) to the Eisenbahn WienvAspang (EWA) and 8 more followed. The design proved such a success that scores more were built for a variety of secondary lines by all the major Austro-Hungarian builders. They were rated to pull a 90-ton load up a 5% grade at 20-22 km/h (12.4-13.7 mph). On the level, their top speed was 50 km/h (31 mph).

Just one, 178.900, was built as a two-cylinder (420 mm diameter) simple-expansion locomotive; it was delivered to the Wien LokalBahn by Wiener Neustadt in 1921. It was later designated BR 92.2201.

The weight shown in this entry represents the most heavily loaded variety; locomotive weights differed depending on the amount of fuel and water carried.

An interesting sidelight is the Wikipedia author's comment that Golsdorf's version of the Heusinger valve gear was only ever used on this design. The Baker gear that became widely used in the United States is apparently quite similar. (External diameter of the fire tubes was 46 mm/1.81")

As might have been expected, locomotives from this class went to all of the successor national railways after the break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the end of World War One. 105 of these were transferred to Czechoslovakia as Class 422, Poland operated the Tkp 11, the JDZ the 52, and Italy obtained some as war reparations; these were FS 893. Romania's set never received a class ID. The BBO retained 66 of the class, produced 19 more, and modified one of these as a simple-expansion engine.

Even after World War II, 50 remained in Austrian service. They then bore the Deutsche Reichsbahn designator BR 92.2211 to 2294.


Class V / 176 (Locobase 8519)

Data from [], data accessed 24 June 2007

Procured in two batches 7 years apart, this quintet were among the last to be named, which were HERKULES, NEPTUN, VULCAN, JUPITER, and SATURN. The latter two weighed about 2 metric tons more each, but were otherwise identical. Like many of the all-adhesion locomotives of the time, the rigid wheelbase was shorter (2.8 m / 9 ft 2") than the adhesion wheelbase, which indicates an end axle with considerable lateral play.

The BWB was taken over by the kKStB in 1894 and the class was numbered 176. More than 2 decades later the five locomotives were adopted by the Czech State Railway, one of the successors to the kKStB after World War One, which redesignated this class 403.1. The CSD didn't run them for long, retiring them in the 1920s.


Class V / 42 / 571 (Locobase 4647)

Data from [], last accessed 30 August 2006.

Faced with the demands of substantial adverse gradients, the StEG designed these 8-coupleds, producing them in their own shops over a 7-year period. As with many Austro-Hungarian locomotive designs, these had a front-heavy appearance, the steam dome's center sitting in front of the first axle and just behind the very tall stack.

By 1900, the locomotives were fitted with a new, slightly smaller boiler and grate.


Class VIIa/b/c/d/e / 171 (Locobase 8527)

Data from [], accessed 24 June 2007.

This 8-coupled freight design was supplied by Wiener Neustadt and Floridsdorf in several batches over a 10-year period. Wiener Neustadt delivered 20 in 1873 (later designated VIIa) and Floridsdorf added 14 in 1874 (VIIb) and a further 8 in 1876-1878 to operate on the Lemberg-Czernowitz-Jassy-Eisenbahn (LCJE). The latter were classed IVf..

In 1882, Esslingen was called upon to supply 10 more and Wiener Neustadt & Floridsdorf completed the series with 5 more in 1883.

If Locobase understands the Wikipedia table correctly, all of these locomotives were refitted with the same boiler design in 1888. All of them were classed 171 and numbered continuously in VIIa, VIIb, IVf, VIIc, VIId, VIIe order.

In that form, they were distributed to successor railways after the breakup of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918. The Czech CSD took all but one of the remaining engines and reclassified them as 411.0, nicknamed "Zemeplaz"; these remained in service for decades with the last being withdrawn only in the 1960s.

Some of these later served the M-V (Hungarian State Railway) as their 459.1 class.


Class Va / 74 (Locobase 8524)

Data from [], accessed 24 June 2007.

This 8-coupled design possessed a good-sized boiler for its cylinder volume, which suited it well for its general freight service. Soon after the BNB took delivery of this sextet, it was absorbed by the kKStB, which reclassed the engines as Type 74s.

After World War One led to the breakup of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, this class went to the new Czech State Railway as its class 414.1. An indication of its useful size and power on a relatively low axle loading was the class's longevity: the last engine was retired only in 1961.


Class Vc / 400 / 478 (Locobase 8522)

Data from Wikipedia [], last accessed 24 June 2007.

Originally delivered to the ÿsterreichisch-ungarischen Staats-Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft (StEG) as their class Vc, these 8-coupled tanks were later redesignated class 400. Note that the rigid wheelbase measured just 985 mm (3 ft 3") which suggests a very tight curve radius made possible by allowing lateral play in both the leading and trailing driven axles.

Hungary took delivery of 5 in 1899 as their class 476. After World War One served to break up the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the rest of the class wound up on the new Czech State Railway as class 400.1. When the Third Reich took over Czechoslovakia, they redesignated them BauReihe 98 78.

They never actually left Czech territory and reverted to CSD ownership in 1945. The last was withdrawn in 1962.


Class Vd / 378 (Locobase 4659)

Data from Wikipedia ([], accessed 24 June 2007), A E Durrant The Steam Locomotives of Eastern Europe (Newton Abbot:David & Charles, 1972), and [] (1 February 2004).

A true Austro-Hungarian class after 1891, these engines served both in Austria (4) and Hungary (9, as MAV 450). They had quite a bit of lateral play in each end axle, so the fixed wheel base came to only 1.185 m (3 ft 10 1/2").

After World War One served to break up the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the class wound up on the new Czech State Railway as class 403.3. Except for one locomotive, which served a sugar refinery until 1965, the class was retired in the early 1930s.


Class Vg / 175 (Locobase 4652)

Data from [], accessed 15 August 2006.

This class contained a lot of changes from the earlier 0-8-0s (Locobase 8525 for the Vn class) that the StEG had been running. To gain more direct heating surface, the tubes were shortened by 400 mm (15.7") and the difference made up by a combustion chamber. The Belpaire firebox's grate was reduced even as its pressure was raised to 12 bar.

The result was a 40 kW (54 hp) increase in power over the Vn to 630 hp and more adhesion t han the the kkStB's class 73, but its top speed was a mere 35 km/h (22 mph). There obviously a role for these engines to play, because the CSD took them over in 1919 as class 312.103 - 312.121. The Czech engine crews called the class the Pracharny (powder mill) because of the inferior coal they used. Although some were retired before World War II, many survived and operated into the 1950s, the last retiring in 1953.


Class Vn / 43 / 75 (Locobase 8525)

Data from [], accessed 24 June 2007.

Wikipedia notes several features known to be characteristic of many Central European locomotives. The two steam domes were connected by an external steam pipe, the long Belpaire firebox sat over the space behind the third driving axle and the last, the cluttered look of the external valve gear. Lateral play in the last axle reduced the rigid wheelbase to 3.33 m (10 ft 11"). The Wikipedia author notes that the large grate signified the low-calorie coal burned in these fireboxes. They were rated at 430 kW (576 hp).

See Locobase 4652 for the successor Vg class (later kKStB 175), which improved on the design. The 75s didn't endure; only 2 survived World War One to enter CSD service as class 414.3 and they were gone by the end of the 1920s.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class174.03174.51151 / 71B III / 70BF IV/73
Locobase ID8517 8518 4649 4648 1211
Railroadkaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)Eisenbahn Pilsen-Priesen(-Komotau (kKStB)Kaiserin Elisabeth-Bahn (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)
CountryAustriaAustriaAustriaAustriaAustria
Whyte0-8-00-8-00-8-00-8-00-8-0
Number in Class1811824454
Road Numbers174 03 - 174 20174 511 - 174 52151-58 / 71.01-71.08166-174, 189-203 /7001-24290-295, 313-328,1165-1177/73.01-73.454
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built1811824454
Builderseveralseveralseveralseveralseveral
Year19121910187618731884
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonGooch
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)12.80 / 3.9012.80 / 3.9012.40 / 3.7811.75 / 3.5812.80 / 3.90
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)12.80 / 3.9012.80 / 3.9012.40 / 3.7811.75 / 3.5812.80 / 3.90
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase11111
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)37.26 / 11.3637.26 / 11.3637.65 / 11.4738.17 / 11.63
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg) / 10,650
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)122,356 / 55,500122,797 / 55,70097,885 / 44,40095,901 / 43,500121,475 / 55,100
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)122,356 / 55,500122,797 / 55,70097,885 / 44,40095,901 / 43,500121,475 / 55,100
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)58,422 / 26,500
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)156,307 / 70,900
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)2508 / 9.50
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)51 / 25.5051 / 25.5041 / 20.5040 / 2051 / 25.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)43.30 / 110043.30 / 110046.30 / 117543.30 / 110043.30 / 1100
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)159.50 / 11159.50 / 11145 / 10145 / 10159.50 / 11
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19.69" x 22.44" / 500x57019.69" x 22.44" / 500x57020.08" x 21.65" / 510x55017.64" x 22.8" / 448x57919.69" x 22.44" / 500x570
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)27,240 / 12355.8727,240 / 12355.8723,238 / 10540.5920,194 / 9159.8627,240 / 12355.87
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.49 4.51 4.21 4.75 4.46
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)124.82 / 11.60114.06 / 10.6098.99 / 9.2097.92 / 9.10120.51 / 11.20
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)26.68 / 2.4827.33 / 2.5422.81 / 2.1218.83 / 1.7524.21 / 2.25
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1809 / 168.101334 / 1241628 / 151.301719 / 159.801958 / 182
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)525 / 48.80
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1809 / 168.101859 / 172.801628 / 151.301719 / 159.801958 / 182
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume228.74168.68205.16266.54247.58
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation42554359330727303861
Same as above plus superheater percentage42555580330727303861
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area19,90923,28614,35414,19819,221
Power L135419649299335843727
Power MT255.21692.93269.64329.56270.56

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

ClassCvIVd / 178/BR 92.2211/OBB 92V / 176V / 42 / 571VIIa/b/c/d/e / 171
Locobase ID8079 1212 8519 4647 8527
Railroadkaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)Bohmische Westbahn (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)Oesterreichische Nordwestbahn (kKStB)
CountryAustriaAustriaAustriaAustriaAustria
Whyte0-8-0T0-8-0T0-8-00-8-00-8-0
Number in Class423057357
Road NumbersCv 1-Cv 4178.005-212, 2323, 295-304, 801-810176.15-19
Gauge76 cmStdStdStdStd
Number Built423057357
BuilderKrauss LinzseveralWiener NeustadtStEGseveral
Year19081900188118681873
Valve GearHeusingerHeusingerStephensonStephensonAllan
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 6.99 / 2.1312.14 / 3.7013.78 / 4.2012.44 / 3.7911.68 / 3.56
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m) 6.99 / 2.1312.14 / 3.7013.78 / 4.2012.44 / 3.7911.68 / 3.56
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase11111
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m) 6.99 / 2.1312.14 / 3.7036.09 / 1131.99 / 9.7531.99 / 9.75
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)37,479 / 17,000114,640 / 52,000102,735 / 46,600101,633 / 46,10093,035 / 42,200
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)37,479 / 17,000114,640 / 52,000102,735 / 46,600101,633 / 46,10093,035 / 42,200
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg) / 31,50059,084 / 26,80061,178 / 27,750
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)37,479 / 17,000114,640 / 52,000160,717 / 72,900154,213 / 69,950
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)528 / 21373 / 5.20 / 112508 / 9.501822 / 6.90
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 1.40 / 1 2.10 / 2
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)16 / 848 / 2443 / 21.5042 / 2139 / 19.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)25.20 / 64044.90 / 114049.50 / 125846.20 / 117343.70 / 1110
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)188.50 / 13188.50 / 13132 / 9.10130.50 / 9145 / 10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)10.63" x 13.39" / 270x340 (1)16.54" x 22.44" / 420x570 (1)20.47" x 24.88" / 520x63218.5" x 24.88" / 470x63018.5" x 23.62" / 470x600
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)16.14" x 13.39" / 410x340 (1)25.59" x 22.44" / 650x570 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)6710 / 3043.6115,452 / 7008.9223,631 / 10718.8520,445 / 9273.7122,800 / 10341.92
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.59 7.42 4.35 4.97 4.08
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)172 - 1.614" / 41
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)12.30 / 3.75
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)38.74 / 3.6070.50 / 6.55114.06 / 10.60105.45 / 9.80107.60 / 10
Grate Area (sq ft / m2) 7.64 / 0.7117.33 / 1.6125.39 / 2.3621.09 / 1.9620.44 / 1.90
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)328 / 30.50936 / 86.951586 / 147.401926 / 1791795 / 166.80
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)328 / 30.50936 / 86.951586 / 147.401926 / 1791795 / 166.80
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume476.96335.46167.36248.82244.27
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation14403267335127522964
Same as above plus superheater percentage14403267335127522964
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area730213,28915,05613,76115,602
Power L126052721247831853353
Power MT612.93209.31212.70276.36317.82

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

ClassVa / 74Vc / 400 / 478Vd / 378Vg / 175Vn / 43 / 75
Locobase ID8524 8522 4659 4652 8525
RailroadB~hmische Nordbahn (kKStB)StEG (kKStB)kaiserlich-Koeniglichen Oesterreichischen StB (kKStB)StEG (kKStB)StEG (kKStB)
CountryAustriaAustriaAustriaAustriaAustria
Whyte0-8-00-8-0T0-8-0T0-8-00-8-0
Number in Class62213196
Road Numbers151-156 / 74.01-061301-13131257-1271
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built62213196
BuilderWiener NeustadtStEGStEGStEGStEG
Year19031885187918941890
Valve GearHeusingerGoochGooch
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)13.78 / 4.2010.99 / 3.3511.66 / 3.5615.09 / 4.6015.09 / 4.60
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)13.78 / 4.2010.99 / 3.3511.66 / 3.5615.09 / 4.6015.09 / 4.60
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase11111
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)36.94 / 11.2610.99 / 3.3511.66 / 3.5637.50 / 11.43
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)118,829 / 53,90085,980 / 39,000111,995 / 50,800117,506 / 53,300114,640 / 52,000
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)118,829 / 53,90085,980 / 39,000111,995 / 50,800117,506 / 53,300114,640 / 52,000
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)71,430 / 32,40070,107 / 31,80070,107 / 31,800
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)190,259 / 86,30085,980 / 39,000111,995 / 50,800187,613 / 85,100184,747 / 83,800
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3168 / 121135 / 4.301584 / 63168 / 123168 / 12
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 6.60 / 6 1.40 / 1 2.50 / 2 6.90 / 6 6.90 / 6
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)50 / 2536 / 1847 / 23.5049 / 24.5048 / 24
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)49.60 / 126035.40 / 90043.30 / 110047 / 119346.20 / 1173
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)174 / 12145 / 10130.50 / 9174 / 12145 / 10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)20.47" x 24.88" / 520x63215.75" x 18.11" / 400x46017.72" x 23.62" / 450x60018.9" x 24.8" / 480x63018.9" x 24.8" / 480x630
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)31,087 / 14100.8415,641 / 7094.6519,000 / 8618.2727,877 / 12644.8123,633 / 10719.76
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 3.82 5.50 5.89 4.22 4.85
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)14.44 / 4.40 / 4.80
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)111.90 / 10.4077.47 / 7.2086.08 / 8129.12 / 12129.12 / 12
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)24.75 / 2.3015.60 / 1.4518.08 / 1.6834.86 / 3.2446.81 / 4.35
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1785 / 165.90969 / 90.101358 / 126.201953 / 181.501788 / 166.20
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1785 / 165.90969 / 90.101358 / 126.201953 / 181.501788 / 166.20
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume188.35237.28201.43242.52222.03
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation43072262235960666787
Same as above plus superheater percentage43072262235960666787
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area19,47111,23311,23322,46718,722
Power L135592841249843983374
Power MT264.12291.39196.69330.06259.54

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