StEG / Tiroler Staatsbahn/ Sudbahn 2-4-2 Locomotives in Austria


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 7 / 13 (Locobase 11210)

Data from [], accessed 14 April 2010. According to Pospichal ([]), works numbers were 210-227.

The Tirol railway put this large class of low-drivered passenger engines into service on the Verona-Bolzano run. As delivered, the footboard was unprotected, the small steam dome sat forward of the leading coupled axle, and the tall, flared, smoke-arresting stack dominated the profile.

Shortly after this inauguration, the Tirol was privatized and merged with the Sudbahn, which operated all but 3 of the class the class for less than 15 years before scrapping them in 1869-1870. (Locobase suspects they were simply too small and outmoded.)

The last two were converted to tank engines and remained in service until 1894-1895.


Class I / 223 (MAV) or kKStB 5 (Locobase 11209)

Data from [], accessed 13 April 2010 and from [], last accesssed 8 May 2010). Production data from [], last accessed 13 April 2010.

StEG built 10 in 1882 (works 1653-1662, road 65-74). Hanomag delivered the next 14 (works 1583-1596) in 1883. StEG built the rest of the class in 1883 (works 1708-1714 and 1725-1732), 1884 (works 1775-1779, 1823) 1885 (works 1831-1834), 1889 (works 2081-2083, 2092), and 1891 (works 2204-2208).

Wikipedia notes that StEG the builder benefited from French financial interest and very often reflected French ideas in locomotive design. These were similar to those built for Paris-Orleans and based on Polonceau's design. The Wikipedia author notes that the 2-4-2 could use the boiler of the 4-4-0. Its simple wedge centering system on the front truck, however, limited its maximum speed.

Photographs show this to have been an astonishingly cluttered design. Shafts, rods, pipes, railings run in purposeful profusion on the boiler. The boiler has the usual 2-steam-dome layout with valves on both, but this particular design adds a recess in the top of the sand dome to allow a straight run for the pipe connecting the two domes. The valve gear is outside, steam chests are canted outboard, the air-brake compressors lie just behind the thick squared duct leading to the smokebox - it's quite a sight.

When the StEG was divided between the Austrian and Hungarian State railways in 1909's nationalization, the MAV received the larger share of 32 engines. The stud included all 10 of the 1882 locomotives They were classed Ig and numbered 601-632, but soon reclassed 223. Fourteen of these were given to Yugoslavia and Romania after World War One.

The 26 Austrians were put into kKStB service as class 5. 24 remained in service after World War One (5.15 was retired in 1917, 5.17 in 1918) and supplied to the successor BB+. Those that remained with the Austrian State were retired in the 1920s.

That railway passed along 6 of the engines -- 2304, 2308-2309, 2318, 2314, 2312 -- to the GySEV, a private railway in Hungary. These lasted much longer, the first not being retired until 1951 and the last in 1959.


Class Ia / 24/205 (Locobase 4676)

Data from [], accessed 11 August 2006. Works numbers 1894-1903 in 1886, 1960-1961 in 1887, 2175-2176 in 1890, 2175-2176 in 1891, 2177-2178, 2212-2217 in 1891; 2424-2427 in 1895, 2517-2720 in 1896.

These were typical express passenger engines of the time. Designed to pull a relatively light rake of coaches, they put only a modest weight on the rails. They operated out of Prague and Trubau.

The lead axle was located behind the smokebox and under the front dome. Just behind the front dome, the sandbox lay offset to the right to allow a clear run for the pipe connecting the front dome to the rear dome set over the firebox.

When the StEG was later divided into its Austrian and Hungarian components, this class remained with the Austrian descendant. 23 of them were classed by the CSD after World War One as 254.3 and some remained in service as late as 1930.


Class Ib / 205 (Locobase 11208)

Data from [], last accessed 14 April 2010. See also TraitT pratique de la machine locomotive ... By Maurice Demoulin, 1898

Librairie polytechnique, Baudry et Cie, p 380.

Known to the builders as Type 100, this pair of light passenger locomotives began on the StEG. Although resembling the Type 1a (Locobase 4676), had bigger grates to handle the poor-quality coal, a Belpaire firebox, and a double steam dome connected by a pipe. The boiler was smaller and so was the cylinder volume.

But these were relatively long-lived. When the StEG was divided up between the two eagles of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the IIs went to Austria and remained in service throughout World War One. When the Austrian kKStB was replaced by the BB+ after the war, these two went as well and operated until 1925 and 1927.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class7 / 13I / 223 (MAV) or kKStB 5Ia / 24/205Ib / 205
Locobase ID11210 11209 4676 11208
RailroadTiroler Staatsbahn/ Sudbahn (kKStB)StEG (kKStB)StEG (kKStB)StEG (kKStB)
CountryAustriaAustriaAustriaAustria
Whyte2-4-22-4-22-4-22-4-2
Number in Class1858302
Road Numbers252-26965-122161-190/2401-2430/205.01-205.30141-142 / 23.51-52 / 105.01-105.02
GaugeStdStdStdStd
Number Built1858302
BuilderWiener NeustadtseveralStEGStEG
Year1857188218861888
Valve GearStephensonGoochAllanStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 6.89 / 2.10 7.28 / 2.22 6.89 / 2.10
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)12.44 / 3.7918.70 / 5.7019.69 / 618.70 / 5.70
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.37 0.37 0.37
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)38.85 / 11.84
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)29,652 / 13,450
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)40,345 / 18,30058,312 / 26,45060,186 / 27,30060,627 / 27,500
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)105,271 / 47,750107,145 / 48,600106,483 / 48,300
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)56,218 / 25,50057,100 / 25,900
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)161,489 / 73,250163,583 / 74,200
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)2640 / 102640 / 10
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 4.30 / 4 4.30 / 4
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)34 / 1749 / 24.5050 / 2551 / 25.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)56 / 142271.70 / 182083.50 / 212071.70 / 1820
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)94.30 / 6.50137.80 / 9.50137.80 / 9.50145 / 10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)16.06" x 24.88" / 408x63216.93" x 25.59" / 430x65018.11" x 25.59" / 460x65016.14" x 25.59" / 410x650
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)9185 / 4166.2511,982 / 5434.9511,773 / 5340.1511,459 / 5197.72
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.39 4.87 5.11 5.29
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)163 - 2.047" / 52
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)15.81 / 4.8216.40 / 5
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)79.84 / 7.42111.95 / 10.40108.68 / 10.10111.47 / 10.36
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)12.48 / 1.1624.86 / 2.3124.75 / 2.3031.85 / 2.96
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1179 / 109.551545 / 143.501418 / 131.801250 / 116.20
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1179 / 109.551545 / 143.501418 / 131.801250 / 116.20
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume202.11231.72185.86206.28
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation1177342634114618
Same as above plus superheater percentage1177342634114618
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area752915,42714,97616,163
Power L12381519849305168
Power MT260.22393.04361.17375.85

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