Deutsche Reichsbahn 0-6-0 Locomotives in Germany


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class BR 80 (Locobase 4325)

Data from Albert Gieseler's Dampfmaschinen und Lokomitiven website at [], last accessed 6 August 2017; supplementing [] (June 2002).

John Oxlade's [] notes this is an Einheitslok, one of a series of standard locomotive designs.

The Japanese website [] this is one of the designs that was in fact built, although clearly not in very great numbers.

See [] for Kurt Miska's full discussion of the BR 80. He gives as builders the following: Hohenzollern (Dnsseldorf), Jung, Union Giesserei (foundry) Konigsberg, Hagans (R. Wolf Erfurt). Hohenzollern built the most, supplying 001-005, 018-022, 028-039). Union produced seven (006-012), and Wolf (013-017) and Jung (023-027) contributed five each.

Its nickname in service was "Bulli" (little bull), a mark of the switcher's ability to pull 900 tons on the level track at 28 mph; take 175 tons up a 0.1% at the same speed and 140 tons up 0.25% at 15.5 mph (25 km/h).

After World War II, 17 wound up in West Germany, 21 in East Germany. The last East German engine was replaced by a diesel in 1963, the last West German leaving service in 1965.


Class BR 89 (Locobase 5021)

Data from KH Miska's account of this class carried (February 2002) on []. Additional data from US Military Railway Service Equipment Data Book -- German Locomotives supplied by Allen Stanley from his extensive Rail Data Exchange in March 2004. (Although the MRS book gives the tube heating surface area as 813 sq ft (75.5 sq m), the count of tubes suggest an area much closer to that of Miska's figure, which is adopted here.)

Miska explains that this trio represented the saturated subclass of a new einheitslok design based on the BR 80 but simplified for production. "First to go," says Miska,"...was the forged frame ...replaced by a welded plate frame. The feed dome was replaced by a feed valve." He adds that there was a simpler sanding arrangment, single-stage air pumps, and a Coale-design poppet valve substituted for the Ackermann safety valve. Welding stitched much of this locomotive together.

Trials showed that Henschel's superheated version was more fuel efficient and powerful than this saturated design. That version (Locobase 4326) did not enter volume production either.


Class BR 89 h2 (Locobase 4326)

Data from KH Miska's account of this class carried (February 2002) on []. Miska explains that the first 3 of this subclass were delivered by Henschel in 1934 to be compared with Schwarzkopff's saturated version.

Although trials showed that this superheated version proved more fuel efficient and powerful than the saturated-steam version, neither variant was built in very large numbers. Altogether, Henschel delivered 7 of these engines before World War II curtailed the program. After the war, the leading model locomotive builder Marklin chose the BR 89 as its Model 3000. Its handy size and look led to widespread use on model railroads and production topped 1 million.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

ClassBR 80BR 89BR 89 h2
Locobase ID4325 5021 4326
RailroadDeutsche ReichsbahnDeutsche ReichsbahnDeutsche Reichsbahn
CountryGermanyGermanyGermany
Whyte0-6-0T0-6-0T0-6-0T
Number in Class3937
Road Numbers80 001-80 03989 001-00389 004.010
GaugeStdStdStd
Number Built3937
BuilderseveralSchwartzkopffHenschel & Sohn
Year192819341934
Valve GearHeusingerWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)10.50 / 3.2010.83 / 3.3010.10 / 3.08
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)10.50 / 3.2010.83 / 3.3010.10 / 3.08
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase111
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)10.50 / 3.2010.83 / 3.3010.10 / 3.08
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)40,124 / 18,20034,392 / 15,600
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)119,931 / 54,400102,734 / 46,599102,734 / 46,599
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)119,931 / 54,400102,734 / 46,599102,734 / 46,599
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)33,069 / 15,000
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)119,931 / 54,400102,734 / 46,599135,803 / 61,599
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)1320 / 51188 / 4.501267 / 4.80
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 2.20 / 2 2.90 / 3 2.90 / 3
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)67 / 33.5057 / 28.5057 / 28.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)43.30 / 110043.30 / 110043.30 / 1100
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)203.10 / 14203.10 / 14203.10 / 14
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)17.72" x 21.65" / 450x55016.54" x 21.65" / 420x55016.54" x 21.65" / 420x550
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)27,104 / 12294.1823,614 / 10711.1423,614 / 10711.14
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.42 4.35 4.35
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)118 - 1.772" / 45219 - 1.77" / 45100 - 1.77" / 45
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)32 - 4.646" / 11828 - 4.646" / 118
Flue/Tube length (ft / m) 8.20 / 2.50 9.18 / 2.80 9.18 / 2.80
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)71.04 / 6.6064 / 5.9564.78 / 6.02
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)16.36 / 1.5215.28 / 1.4215.28 / 1.42
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)749 / 69.62960 / 89.22731 / 67.94
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)274 / 25.50259 / 24.07
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1023 / 95.12960 / 89.22990 / 92.01
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume121.20178.31135.77
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation332331033103
Same as above plus superheater percentage422031033910
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area18,32412,99816,578
Power L1846834859218
Power MT466.99224.36593.44

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