Vale of Rheidol Light Railway 2-6-2 Locomotives in Great_Britain


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class Edward VII (Locobase 10236)

Data from "Tank Locomotives, Vale of Rheidol Ry," The Locomotive Magazine, Vol VII (August 1902), p. 136. Works numbers were 1 and 2. Information about the VofR from [], last accessed 23 April 2009.

These two tanks were the first locomotives to be built by this firm, which had conducted some locomotive overhauls. They are said to be similar to those of the Lynton & Barstaple Railway.

The VofR was a Welsh railway (Cardiganshire) that started from the port town of Aberystwith and ran 11 1/2 miles to Devil's Bridge. It opened in 1902 to serve Rheidol Valley lead mines, timber shipments, even passenger traffic that could board at Aberystwyth, Llanbadarn, Capel Bangor, Nantyronen and Devil's Bridge. One of its grades runs at 2% for 4 miles and the total elevation gain from the Cambrian coast to the terminus is 600 feet.

Although prosperous enough by 1912 to merit consideration for conversion to electric traction, the railway was taken over by the Cambrian Railways. When the Great Western took over the Cambrian, it undertook the "rebuilding" of #1213 Prince of Wales, but instead produced a new locomotive using the same number. When the other two locomotives in that later class were produced, #1212 was declared redundant and scrapped in 1930.

The GWR began closing marginal lines with the result that all goods traffic was diverted by 1930 and tourist traffic in the summer became its main service. Even that stopped in 1939 through 1945. Remarkably, tourist service not only resumed in 1946, but also remained in service and under steam by British Rail using the GWR tanks until 1989.

Brecon Mountain Railway initially owned the line after privatization, but sold it in 1996 to the Phyllis Rampton Trust, which collects narrow-gauge locomotives from around the world.


Class Owain Glyndwr (Locobase 20965)

Data from "Tank Locomotives, Vale of Rheidol Ry," The Locomotive Magazine, Volume XXIX (15 October 1923), p. 306. See also "OUR LOCOMOTIVES" on the Vale of Rheidol Railway website at [], last accessed 2 December 2021.

In 1902, the Vale of Rheidol took delivery of the first two tank locomotives to operate on this Welsh narrow-gauge line. More than twenty years later and after the little line was grouped with several others under the Great Western herald, the GWR's Swindon works tweaked the original design and delivered road numbers 7 and 8. The 7's name is the Welsh name for Owen Glendower. #8 was named Llywelyn.

Changes to the original included a higher boiler pressure setting, replacing inside Stephenson link motion with external radial valve gear outside of the frame, and added weight.

The GWR began closing marginal lines with the result that all goods traffic was diverted by 1930 and tourist traffic in the summer became its main service. Even that stopped in 1939 through 1945. Remarkably, tourist service not only resumed in 1946, but also remained in service and under steam by British Rail using the GWR tanks until 1989.

Brecon Mountain Railway initially owned the line after privatization, but sold it in 1996 to the Phyllis Rampton Trust, which collects narrow-gauge locomotives from around the world. As of 2021, both locomotives gleamed in their dark green GWR livery accented by bright brass chimney caps and safety valve stands. Their long tanks extended from the cab front on each side to points just ahead of the smokebox door.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

ClassEdward VIIOwain Glyndwr
Locobase ID10236 20965
RailroadVale of Rheidol Light RailwayVale of Rheidol Light Railway
CountryGreat BritainGreat Britain
Whyte2-6-2T2-6-2T
Number in Class22
Road Numbers1-2/1212-12137-8
Gauge60 cm60 cm
Number Built22
BuilderDavies & MetcalfeSwindon
Year19021923
Valve GearStephensonWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)66
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)49,280 / 22,35356,000 / 22,353
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)49,280 / 22,35356,000 / 22,353
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)660 / 2.50624 / 2.50
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)30 / 76230 / 762
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)150 / 10.30165 / 10.30
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)11" x 17" / 279x43211.5" x 17" / 279x432
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)8742 / 3965.3110,511 / 4767.72
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort)
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)40 / 3.7240 / 3.72
Grate Area (sq ft / m2) 8.75 / 0.81 8.75 / 0.81
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)420 / 39.03420 / 39.03
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)420 / 39.03420 / 39.03
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume224.62205.51
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation13131444
Same as above plus superheater percentage13131444
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area60006600
Power L124872503
Power MT

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