Midland 4-4-0 Locomotives in Great_Britain


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1000 (Locobase 2269)

Data from Charles S Lake, "New Compound Locomotives, Midland Railway", The Model Engineer and Amateur Electrician, Volume 14 (3 May 1906), p. 418. See also "Three Cylinder Compound Express Locomotives, Midland Railway," Railway Engineer, Volume 27, No 5 (May 1906), pp. 151-154; and Ahrons (1927) for data, supplemented by A T Taylor, Modern British Locomotives (London: E & FN Spon, Ltd, 1907), p. 6; Charles Rous-Marten, "British Locomotive, Practice and Performance", Railway Magazine, Volume 22, No 5 (May 1908), pp. 375-376; and J Snowden Bell, "Individual Paper on Three-Cylinder Locomotives", Report of the Proceedings of the ... Annual Convention of the American Railway Master Mechanics' Association, Volume 46 (session of 13 June 1913), pp.234-289.

Three-cylinder compound with one HP and two LP cylinder, each supplied by a 10" (254 mm) piston valve, as produced by Deeley with narrow fireboxes and a Belpaire boiler. Deeley deleted the reducing and regulating valves that were part of the original Smith design. Ahrons commented: "The Deeley regulator simplifies the engine, but does not allow of the varied adjustment possible with the Smith reducing valve, when hill climbing."

Other commentators -- notably Tuplin (1966) -- would question whether there really was much of a difference. As Rous-Marten's abashed recounting of Midland Railway Deeley's protest to earlier comments (see reference above) indicates, Deeley felt it mattered very much.

Sir Henry Fowler said there were advantages to compounding. In a 1913 comment (p. 287) on J Snowden Bell's long presentation on three-cylinder locomotives, he reported "We have forty-five three-cylinder compound engines, working perfectly satisfactorily, at 220-pound pressure, and as compared with our simple engines on similar work,' I fancy the gain we have had in coal consumption has been 7 per cent."

At that point, however, Sir Henry claimed that space available in the locomotives probably prevented superheating. But Locobase 2271 shows how quickly he seems to have changed his mind.


Class 1000 - S/4P-B (Locobase 2271)

Data from E S Cox, "A Modern Locomotive History: Ten Years' Devlopment on the LMS - 1923-1932", Paper 457 Journal of the Institute of Locomotive Engineers, (delivered at the Newcastle meeting, 27 February 1946), pp. 100-170, especially p. 114. See also Ahrons (1927); J Snowden Bell, "Individual Paper on Three-Cylinder Locomotives", Report of the Proceedings of the ... Annual Convention of the American Railway Master Mechanics' Association, Volume 46 (session of 13 June 1913), pp.234-289; and "Superheating Steam in Locomotives", Power, Volume 39, No 6 (June 1914), p.212.

Sir Henry Fowler's comment on J Snowden Bell's long paper on three-cylinder locomotives appeared to rule out superheating the Deeley three-cylinder compounds in Locobase 2269 for space reasons:

"I would like to say that the Great Central Railway of England has built one of these engines which operates as a switching engine, which works on a hump, and the Northeastern Railroad Company has in service a considerable number of three-cylinder superheater engines. The difficulty, of course, with us, is that we have not the room to put the big cylinder on the side, and have to put it in between. 1 take it that you also will have to come to something of that kind."

Six months later, however, several journals reported on Sir Henry's 13 January 1914 presentation to the Institution of Civil Engineers of Great Britain. After noting savings in fuel and water in simple-expansion Midland engines, Fowler continued:

"Experiments have been carried out to ascertain the effect of superheating the steam supplied to the high-pressure cylinder of a three-cylinder compound locomotive, and it has been found that a saving of coal of 25.9 per cent. and of water of 22.3 per cent. has resulted when comparison is made with a similar engine using saturated steam."

Well! And he walked the walk he talked, too. Fowler superheated all of the Deeleys. The shell remained about the same size, but the internal arrangements of tubes and flues changed. Note what was at the time a generous amount of superheat surface as a ratio of combined heating surface. The HP cylinder was served by a piston valve, the two LP cylinders used slide valves.

So sound a design was this 4-4-0 that the London, Midland, & Scottish -- one of the groups formed in 1923 -- produced 140 more at Derby in the 1920s; see Locobase 3025

Tufnell (1986) gives a total heating surface area of the Midland compounds as 1,720 sq ft with the same grate area. He's probably referring to these superheated rebuilds.


Class 1312 (Locobase 2992)

Data from [LL], "Midland Bogie Engines", English Mechanic and World of Science, Volume 27, No. 693 (), p. 419 [14534]. See also (Glover (1967).

This was the first of several SW Johnson Midland eight-wheeler classes, most of which had taller drivers.


Class 1327 (Locobase 2993)

Data from Ahrons (1927) as well as from Frederick Colyer, A treatise on modern steam engines and boilers: Including Land, Locomotive, and Marine Engines and Boilers (London: E & F N Spon, 1886), pp. 85-86. See also Frederick Smeeton Williams, The Midland Railway: Its Rise and Progress: A Narrative of Modern Enterprise-Fourth Edition (London: Bemrose & Company, 1878). Dubs works numbers were 1003-1022.

This ws the first class of SW Johnson's seven-foot eight-wheelers that set the tone for Midland locomotives for years to come.

According to a contemporary account :"These engines take fourteen coaches, or a gross load of 222 tons, at 50 miles an hour over gradients of 1 in 120 to 1 in 130, with a consumption of 28 lb. of coal per mile." Colyer added that the trains "...run very steadily round curves of rather small radius, especially on the portion of the line between Derby and Manchester." His comment that the expresses ran 95 miles from Manchester to Leicester without stopping provides a benchmark for water consumption as well.

Williams's elegaic celebration of the Midland express engine, couched in words to stir the pride of any Board of Directors for whom he might be writing, begins on page 650 of his work. A sample of the prose style reads:

"And here we may remark that there is nothing (except perhaps a good dividend) of which railway directors and managers are so proud as of their express trains. Commodious stations, easy gradients, costly engineering works, are all very well, but they are only means to an end, and the running of these expresses is, so to speak, that end. Like a mighty shuttle in the vast loom of the national life, the express flies backwards and forwards on its swift and straight career, with half a kingdom for its weft. "

Locobase has to say that imagining the express as the shuttle in a loom is a pretty good image. And once Williams steps onto the locomotive's footplate, his word pictures (e.g., "Everything on a locomotive is as unyielding as iron and steel can make it. Nor is it any wonder that it is hot, for within a few feet of the footplate are three or four hundred gallons of boiling water, and also a firebox that is a seething cauldron of five or ten hundredweight of coals that are, not only burning, but burning like a blast furnace ...") offer a vivid impression of the driver and fireman's works stations.


Class 1667 (Locobase 2233)

Data from E L Ahrons, The British Railway Locomotive, 1825-1925 (London: Locomotive Publishing Company, 1926). See also "Johnson locomotives-1667 series" on [], last accessed 14 October 2022.

SW Johnson design of relatively small dimensions compared to earlier Midland 4-4-0s. Ahrons explained the drop in heating surface by noting the smaller number of firetubes, which consisted of 175 and 30 copper tubes of different diameters.This decrease was prompted by cracks that appeared in the tube plates of the copper fireboxes. The cracks were determined to be caused by a copper formulation that was too pure (because the copper smelters were also serving the new electrical industry). Adding a bit of arsenic to the blend toughened up the alloy. That expedient was adopted for all British copper fireboxes.

These engines received the steel boiler of the 1740s in 1886, which increased their heating surface to 1,261 sq ft (117.15 sq m). What made them "much better engines", however, was the substitution of piston valves for the overhead slide valves that had been fitted in the original setup.


Class 1738 (Locobase 2234)

Data from E L Ahrons, The British Railway Locomotive, 1825-1925 (London: Locomotive Publishing Company, 1926). See also John Dews, LMS Route: Birmingham West Suburban Railway-Bournville Shed: mrb9, found on WarwickshireRailways.com at [] . Samuel W Johnson design of relatively small dimensions. These differed from the earlier 1667s by having smaller cylinders and tubes and steel boilers. The design was quite successful, the rise in boiler pressure to 160 psi (11 bar) resulting in fuel economy of 11 to 13% over those pressed to 140 psi (9.66 bar).

John Dews reported that the engines were renumbered 358-377 and extensively modified in 1907 when Deeley fitted ten of them with the much larger "H" type boiler pressed to 175 psi (12.1 bar) and a new cab. In the 'teens, ten of the engines received the G7 Belpaire boiler - these were 358, 361, 363, 365-366, 368-369, 372, 374, 376. Even though the class gave up the coupled splashers of the original design for a straight footplate and boxed-in splashers, this group retained its seven-foot drivers.

The last was withdrawn in 1940.


Class 2183 (Locobase 2253)

Data from Data from E L Ahrons, The British Railway Locomotive, 1825-1925 (London: Locomotive Publishing Company, 1926).

This slight variation on the 1740 (Locobase 2233) entered service a few years later. They had slide valves while the 80 class had piston valves.


Class 2631 (Locobase 2268)

See Ahrons (1927) for data, supplemented by [], accessed 28 May 2007, which derives its information primarily from Radford, J.B. Derby Works and Midland locomotives: the story of the works, its men, and the locomotives they built. 1971. Also see Additional data from Report of proceedings of the ... annual convention of the American Railway Master Mechanics' Association, (American Railway Master Mechanics' Association, 1913), pp. 265-271.

Smith-type compound with one HP and one LP cylinders, all driven by Stephenson link motion inside. The inside HP cylinder was served by piston valve, the outside, LP cylinders by slide valves. Unlike Smith's engine (Locobase 2231), the LP and HP cylinders had the same stroke and thus a higher compounding ratio. Belpaire boilers featuring the square-shouldered fireboxes were a prominent feature.

The second and fifth were briefly fitted with Serve fire tubes. These were a French design of 2 3/4" (70 mm) diameter that had internal ribs or fins. In the Midland engines they resulted in a total evaporative heating surface of 1,720 sq ft (159.8 sq m). After a brief trial, both 2632 and 2635 were fitted with the orthodox boiler in 1904.


Class 483/2P (Locobase 3758)

Data from Richard Gibb's contribution to Bryan Attewell ([] Steam locomotion simulator (April 2000 edition), supplemented by "Railway Notes-Midland Railway", Locomotive Magazine, Volume XIX [19], No 246 (15 February 1913), p. ; and Locomotive News and Railway Notes, Volume XIII [13], No 21 (25 November 1922), p. 122-123.

Glover (1967) notes that these were Midland engines carried into the LMS through grouping. The were Henry Fowler rebuilds of the 1904 rebuilds of the 1893 Samuel W Johnson 4-4-0s described in Locobase 10145. Johnson oversaw the 1904 project, which adopted the then- standard H type boiler and fitted it to 30 locomotives.

Fowler's update began in 1910 by installing G7 saturated boilers with Belpaire fireboxes to two locomotives, but he quickly substituted the G7s superheated vessed beginning in 1912 with 483-522 LN&RC contended that the term "rebuild" applied to these engines "is open to question ...Very little of the original remains." They had new frames, new and larger cylinders, taller drivers, new cabs, new G7 boilers, smoke boxes, and superheaters.

They totalled 146 of the earlier Eight-wheeler engines altogether.


Class 60 (Locobase 10109)

Data from "Four-Coupled Bogie Express Engines, Midland Railway," The Locomotive & Railway Carriage & Wagon Review, Vol IV (February 1899), p. 9. Derby Works produced 30 locomotives, Neilson & Company supplied the other 10.

Part of the long series of Johnson-built express-passenger bogies, this was the first batch with 21.3 sq ft grates and 7-ft drivers.


Class 805 (Locobase 3545)

See Ahrons (1927) for data. This class first entered service as the 80 class and had 19 1/2" cylinders. Although that diameter was reduced to 19" in the 2636s, the use of piston valves persisted and these were very successful engines.


Class 990 (Locobase 2282)

Data from Charles S Lake, "New Express Locomotive", Locomotive Notes, The Model Engineer and Electrician, Volume 17 (1 August 1907), p.p. 107-108. See also Lake, in his Locomotives of 1907 (London: Percival Marshall & Co, 1907), presented on [], last accessed 31 January 2009. Also see Ahrons (1927) .

R M Deeley's simple-expansion extension of the 1000 design. Used a Belpaire firebox with a grate that sloped upward to the rear, which permitted a larger grate without lengthening the coupling rods. Glover (1967) notes that the one disadvantage of this arrangement was that it restricted the amount of firebox heating surface. Boiler pressure when delivered was 220 psi. Notice the sizable tender.

Lake added that the valve gear that actuated the 8 3/4" (222 mm) piston valves took a different approach from most:"...[T]he principal feature of which is that no eccentrics are employed, neither is there any return crank or similar device, such as are employed in the Walschaerts' and kindred valve motions. The travel of the valve for lead is derived from a pendulum link, and a rod attached to the crosshead of the adjacent [cylinder's] motion is utilised for the purpose of oscillating the suspension link."

"The arrangement," Lake commented, "gives an excellent steam distribution, and it offers the advantage of dispensing with eccentrics on the crank axle."

Later superheating changed the heating surface values to 1,170 sq ft (108.7 sq m) of tube surface, 151 sq ft (14 sq m) from the firebox, and 360 sq ft (33.45 sq m) of superheater.


Class Class 3 Belpaire/700 (Locobase 2278)

See Ahrons (1927) for data, supplemented and corrected by [], accessed 28 May 2007, which acknowledges a deep indebtedness to Radford, J.B. Derby Works and Midland locomotives: the story of the works, its men, and the locomotives they built. 1971.

Further elaboration of SW Johnson's series of Midland 4-4-0s, but fitted with GX Belpaire boilers. The last fifteen locomotives had the G8 boiler that had 262 tubes of 6" greater length than the earlier boiler. This resulted in a total heating surface of 1,528 sq ft.

Most were later superheated by Richard Deeley beginning in 1913. In the process they received a reworked cab and new cylinders.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class10001000 - S/4P-B131213271667
Locobase ID2269 2271 2992 2993 2233
RailroadMidlandMidlandMidlandMidlandMidland
CountryGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat Britain
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class4545102010
Road Numbers1000-10441000-10441312-1321/300-3091327-1346/310-3271667-1676
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built45102010
BuilderDerbyDerbyKitson & CoDubs & CoDerby
Year19051913187618771884
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonJoy
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 9.60 / 2.93 9.50 / 2.90 8.50 8.50 / 2.59
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.25 / 7.3924.25 / 7.3921.50 / 6.5521.67 / 6.61
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.40 0.39 0.40 0.39
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)48.27 / 14.7147.12 / 14.36
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)43,792 / 19,864
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)87,584 / 39,72787,808 / 39,82960,144 / 27,28155,636 / 25,23662,680 / 28,431
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)134,176 / 60,861134,176 / 60,86190,384 / 40,99887,304 / 39,60095,880 / 43,490
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)96,096 / 43,58895,200 / 43,18257,12080,752 / 36,629
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)230,272 / 104,449229,376 / 104,043144,424 / 39,600176,632 / 80,119
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4200 / 15.914200 / 15.9135403000 / 11.36
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 7.70 / 7 6.05 / 5.50 3.90
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)73 / 36.5073 / 36.5050 / 2546 / 2352 / 26
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)84 / 213484 / 213478 / 198184 / 213484 / 2134
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)220 / 15.20200 / 13.80140 / 9.70140 / 9.70140 / 9.70
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19" x 26" / 483x660 (1)19" x 26" / 483x660 (1)17.5" x 26" / 445x66018" x 26" / 457x66019" x 26" / 483x660
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)21" x 26" / 533x66021" x 26" / 533x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)17,234 / 7817.2215,668 / 7106.8912,148 / 5510.2511,934 / 5413.1813,297 / 6031.42
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.08 5.60 4.95 4.66 4.71
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)216 - 1.875" / 48146 - 1.75" / 44223 - 1.75" / 44205 - 1.75" / 44
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)21 - 5.125" / 130
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)12.20 / 3.7212.31 / 3.7510.83 / 3.3010.9210.87 / 3.31
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)152.80 / 14.20151 / 14.03120 / 11.15110 / 10.22110.10 / 10.23
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)28.40 / 2.6428.40 / 2.6417.50 / 1.6317.50 / 1.6317.50 / 1.63
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1458 / 135.451321 / 122.731225 / 113.811313 / 122.031122 / 104.24
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)290 / 26.94
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1458 / 135.451611 / 149.671225 / 113.811313 / 122.031122 / 104.24
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume341.77309.65169.24171.46131.50
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation62485680245024502450
Same as above plus superheater percentage62486702245024502450
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area33,61635,63616,80015,40015,414
Power L1656612,588458947683842
Power MT330.55632.10336.43377.87270.27

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class173821832631483/2P60
Locobase ID2234 2253 2268 3758 10109
RailroadMidlandMidlandMidlandMidlandMidland
CountryGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat Britain
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class2025514640
Road Numbers1738-1757/358-3772183-2202/403-4272631-263560-69, 93, 138-139+/523-562
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built2025540
BuilderDerbyseveralDerbyHorwichseveral
Year18851890190119121898
Valve GearStephensonStephensonWalschaertStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 8.50 / 2.59 8.99 / 2.74 9.60 / 2.93 9.60 / 2.93 9.50 / 2.90
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)21.67 / 6.6122.01 / 6.7124.25 / 7.3922.71 / 6.9222.62 / 6.89
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.39 0.41 0.40 0.42 0.42
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)44.77 / 13.65
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)33,600 / 15,24144,688 / 20,27039,200 / 17,781
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)63,000 / 28,57666,910 / 30,35086,968 / 39,44877,168 / 35,00368,628 / 31,129
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)95,665 / 43,39399,166 / 44,981133,308 / 60,468119,588 / 54,244102,424 / 46,459
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)80,752 / 36,629117,908 / 53,48289,236 / 40,477
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)176,417 / 80,022251,216 / 113,950208,824 / 94,721
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)39003899 / 14.775400 / 20.453900 / 13.264200 / 15.91
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 3.30 3.90 / 3.50 5.50 / 5 4.40 / 45 / 5
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)53 / 26.5056 / 2872 / 3664 / 3257 / 28.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)84 / 213484 / 213484 / 213481 / 205784.50 / 2146
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)160 / 11160 / 11195 / 13.40160 / 11170 / 11.70
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 26" / 457x66018.5" x 26" / 470x66019" x 26" / 483x660 (1)20.5" x 26" / 521x66019.5" x 26" / 495x660
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)21" x 26" / 533x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)13,639 / 6186.5514,407 / 6534.9115,276 / 6929.0918,346 / 8321.6216,907 / 7668.90
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.62 4.64 5.69 4.21 4.06
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)246 - 1.625" / 41244 - 1.614" / 41261 - 1.75" / 44148 - 1.75" / 44236 - 1.625" / 41
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)21 - 5.125" / 130
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)10.50 / 3.2010.50 / 3.2010.50 / 3.2010.92 / 3.33
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)110.10 / 10.23117 / 10.87150 / 13.94127 / 11.80128 / 11.90
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)17.67 / 1.6419.59 / 1.8227.14 / 2.5221.10 / 1.9621.30 / 1.98
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1261 / 117.191223 / 113.621598 / 148.511172 / 108.881233 / 114.59
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)313 / 29.08
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1261 / 117.191223 / 113.621598 / 148.511485 / 137.961233 / 114.59
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume164.67151.19374.58118.00137.20
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation28273134529233763621
Same as above plus superheater percentage28273134529240853621
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area17,61618,72029,25024,58721,760
Power L152995007615010,0564990
Power MT370.87329.95311.80574.58320.60

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class805990Class 3 Belpaire/700
Locobase ID3545 2282 2278
RailroadMidlandMidlandMidland
CountryGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat Britain
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class101080
Road Numbers805-809, 2636-2640990-9992606-10, 800-04, 2781-2790, 810-869/700-779
GaugeStdStdStd
Number Built101080
BuilderDerbyDerbyDerby
Year190119071900
Valve GearStephensonDeeley
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 9.50 / 2.90 9.50 / 2.90 9.50 / 2.90
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)22.70 / 6.9224.35 / 7.4222.42 / 6.83
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.42 0.39 0.42
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)47.34 / 14.43
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)38,024 / 17,24740,936 / 18,568
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)68,628 / 31,12986,296 / 39,14377,504 / 35,155
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)102,424 / 46,459130,424 / 59,159116,200 / 52,707
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)102,872 / 46,662117,292 / 53,203
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)233,296 / 105,821233,492 / 105,910
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4200 / 15.914800 / 18.18
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT)7 / 64 / 4
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)57 / 28.5072 / 3665 / 32.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)84 / 213478.50 / 199489.50 / 2273
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)170 / 11.70220 / 15.20185 / 12.80
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19.5" x 26" / 495x66019" x 26" / 483x66019.5" x 26" / 495x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)17,007 / 7714.2522,359 / 10141.8817,370 / 7878.91
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.04 3.86 4.46
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)236 - 1.625" / 41249 - 1.75" / 44272 - 1.75" / 44
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)12.31 / 3.7510.50 / 3.20
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)128 / 11.90152.80 / 14.20145 / 13.48
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)21.30 / 1.9828.40 / 2.6425 / 2.32
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1233 / 114.591557 / 144.651519 / 141.17
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1233 / 114.591557 / 144.651519 / 141.17
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume137.20182.49169.02
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation362162484625
Same as above plus superheater percentage362162484625
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area21,76033,61626,825
Power L1496078306890
Power MT318.67400.07391.98

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