North Eastern 4-4-0 Locomotives in Great_Britain


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class 1492/38 (Locobase 2232)

Data from John S Maclean, The Locomotives of the North Eastern Railway-1841-1922 (Newcastle-upon-Tyne: R Robinson & Company, 1922?), pp. 66; E L Ahrons, The British Railway Locomotive, 1825-1925 (London: Locomotive Publishing Company, 1926); and Glover (1967). See also Wapedia [] for Worsdell boiler rebuilds. North Eastern's Gateshead works produced sixteen in 1884. R W Hawthorn works numbers were 1996-2001 in 1884, 2002-2007 in 1885.

Glover asserted these McDonnell-designed engines were not a big success in part because they were a bit too small and because the chief mechanical engineer's firm style rankled the drivers. About all John S MacLean would concede was to admit there was "little doubt that this design from the aesthetic point of view was an improvement on many engines tha had hitherto run on the NE system." And the swing-link bogie "was a welcome addition for which the designer deserved credit for introducing on the line."

They lacked the "ease, freedom, and power of Mr Fletcher's creations", MacLean asserted. Moreover, detail changes irritated the crews. McDonnell relocated the reversing lever on the left side and "a source of trouble at the beginning was some stiffness in movement." Eliminating the cylinder drain-cocks proved to be "one of the chief sources of content."

They were soon supplanted by the Tennant 2-4-0s (Locobase 2227).

NB: Tube length is an estimate based on the calculation of tube surface area by subtracting reported firebox heating surface from reported total evaporative heating surface


Class 1619 - 2-cylinder compound (Locobase 20139)

Data from John S MacLean, "North Eastern Railway, No. 1620 Class & No 1619. A Twice Built Compound," Locomotives and Railways, Volume 2, No 7 (July 1901), pp. 85-87.

Interested in the anticipated economies of compounding steam, as were so many railroads at the time, the North Eastern applied Chief of the Locomotive Department Wilson Worsdell's two-cylinder layout to one of the M class (which are described in Locobase 2254). Unlike most other unequal compounds, the NER placed the two cylinders inside the plate frames, the HP cylinder on the left, the LP on the right.

According to the L&R's account, the bulk of the cylinders left no room for their valves, which had to be located outside and operated by rocker shafts. "Ugly-looking" boxes over the steam chests and sloping down from the smokebox gave "the appearance of an extraordinarily wide smokebox and ...the whole engine a very massive look."

1619's work on main line expresses appeared to bear out the design's ability to generate power to haul heavy loads unassisted while consuming "decidedly" less coal, "but she had some difficulty in starting away with trains and getting up to speed." A key defect of the valves' outside locations (and a lack of insulation) meant a susceptibility to temperature differences and a liability to crack.

1619 left the railway in 1898 to be "committed to the 'tender' mercies of the repairing shops at Gateshead." What happened next is described in Locobase 2231.


Class 3CC Smith compound/D19 (Locobase 2231)

Data from John S MacLean, "North Eastern Railway, No. 1620 Class & No 1619. A Twice Built Compound," Locomotives and Railways, Volume 2, No 8 (August 1901), pp. 93-95 and No 9 (September 1901), pp. 105-. See also Charles Rous-Marten, "New Express Engine for the North Eastern Railway", Volume 86 (14 October 1898), p 378; Charles Rous-Marten, "British Locomotive, Practice and Performance", Railway Magazine, Volume 22, No 5 (May 1908), pp. 375-376; and Ahrons (1927).

This single example originally was built as the Worsdell-von Borries compound trial horse (Locobase 20139) of the M Class in 1893 (Locobase 2254). That class continued to be built as simple-expansion engines, but 1619 remained available for further experiments.

As the L&R account reported, the 1619's deficiencies as a two-cylinder compound led her to disappear into the Gateshead shops in early 1898, where she "remained for a month or two in obscurity, few aware of the great change that was being wrought on this iron monster during her second acquaintance with the forge and smithies."

What emerged was the trial engine for Smith's pioneering three-cylinder compound system in which one HP cylinder exhausted into two LP cylinders of nearly equal diameter for further work. Glover (1967) commented that the arrangement was more symmetrical in appearance than Webb's two HP-one LP system and provided a more even draft. Unusually, the HP cylinder had a stroke that was two inches (50.8 mm) longer than those of the two LP cylinders; the compounding ratio thus was quite low. Steam was admitted to the HP cylinder through Smith's "piston and relief valves combined".

(NB: Deeley's Midland three-cylinder compounds were NOT, he strongly stated to both Charles Rous-Marten in 1908 and J F Gairns, "Smith" compounds. Deeley's were better, he maintained to Rous-Marten, because "The Smith reducing-valve arrangement frequently failed, so I fitted the engines with a much more simple arrangement." See Locobase 2269)

In addition, heating surface areas in the firebox and boiler and on the grate increased considerably. Seventeen water tubes contributed 39 sq ft (3.63 sq m) to the firebox heating surface area, while "giving a better water circulation. A year later, Gateshead installed a "patent" firebox that had across the upper portion three groups, each of seven water tubes. MacClean explained that the tubes were "bent to a long spiral so as to give a certain amount of elasticity and thus reduce the strains arising from expansion when hot."

Perhaps for these reasons, Smith's compounding method was much more widely used than that of Francis Webb's. In fact, Glover adds, it was " the one successful compound system standing to the credit of British engineers."

[] notes that the engine ran on until October 1930 -- the single member of LNER's D19 class.


Class Class M/Q - superheated (Locobase 3527)

Data from Richard Marsden's online LNER Encyclopedia ([], accessed 4 March 2006).

Part of a large war effort to improve the running efficiency of older North Eastern engines, the two near-sister classes of 4-4-0s essentially were merged into one. Note that overall heating surface decreased from the earlier designs, but the superheat area was remarkably generous for a British engine. 8 3/4" piston valves served the cylinders.


Class F - compound (Locobase 3540)

Data from Reder (1974) and E L Ahrons, The British Railway Locomotive, 1825-1925 (London: Locomotive Publishing Company, 1926). See also OS Nock (Locomotives of the NER, 1954)

T W Worsdell design to explore the two-cylinder compound arrangement first tried by von Borries; the first two -- 1324 and 340 were 2-4-0s distinguished from each other by the use of slide valves in 1324 and Smith's patent piston valves in 340.

OS Nock commented that the care taken in setting up a longer cutoff on the LP side (e.g., 50% HP vs 73% LP or, for more power, 70% HP vs 84% LP) made them relatively free-running engines. Despite this, "the North Eastern compounds had a harsh and noisy beat, all the more noticeable in contrast to the quiet and apparently effortless running of the 'Tennants' (simple 2-4-0s) and 'Fletchers'".

NB: Tube length is an estimate and derived by subtracting the known firebox heating surface area from the known evaporative heating surface area and determining which tube length provides the best fit for the known number and diameters of the tubes.


Class F - simpled/superheated - D22 (Locobase 3542)

Richard Marsden's online LNER Encyclopedia ([], accessed 4 March 2006).

Sometime after 1900, Wilson Worsdell simpled his brother's F-class compounds. During World War I, the North Eastern inaugurated a fleet-wide program to superheat several of the older classes, including the F class (and the F1s that were built as simples alongside the Fs). The above data show the results.


Class F1 / D22 (Locobase 3543)

E L Ahrons, The British Railway Locomotive, 1825-1925 (London: Locomotive Publishing Company, 1927).

TW Worsdell design for a simple-expansion Eight-wheeler that was built at the same time as the F-class compounds (Locobase 3540). See also OS Nock (Locomotives of the NER, 1954).

The adhesion and total weights are those given for the compounds; the actual figures for the simples are probably a little lower.

[], the LNER class website, notes that in addition to the ten built in 1887, the class grew with the addition of two converted Class D 2-4-0 compounds in 1896 and Wilson Worsdell's wholesale reconstruction of 25 F-class compounds to simple working. In the early 1900s, Worsdell took out the slide valves and their Joy valve gear, replacing the kit with link motion actuating piston valves.


Class G conversion / D23 (Locobase 7478)

Data from Richard Marsden's online LNER Encyclopedia ([], accessed 4 March 2006) and Mike Parkes' LNER classes website [], accessed 5 March 2006.

Parkes notes that this class consisted of TW Worsdell conversions of a class of 2-4-0s originally produced in 1887-1888 (for which see Locobase 8446). The Gs survived the Grouping as D23s. The first was withdrawn in 1930, the last in 1935.


Class Ginx Babies (Locobase 2990)

These relatively unsuccessful engines -- Class 238 -- were among the first English 4-4-0s with outside cylinders. They were designed by W. Bouch and built at the Darlington Works for operation on the Stockton & Darlington section of the NER.

They had 13" (330 mm) brass piston valves, a very long stroke, and several ill-considered design features. OS Nock (Locomotives of the North Eastern Railway, 1954) noted " these engines needed a most inordinate amount of nursing; their troubles proved to be not merely of teething, but to be lifelong."

The particular configuration of the ball-and-socket bogie mounting earned Ahrons' (1927) comment that "Altogether it seems a somewhat perilous bogie to be let loose on an unoffending railway." He adds that E Fletcher later rebuilt them as 17 x 26 cylinder 2-4-0s.


Class M1// D17/1 (Locobase 2254)

Data from "North Eastern Railway, No. 1620 Class & No 1619. A Twice Built Compound," Locomotives and Railways, Volume 2, No 7 (July 1901), pp. 85-87.

These were quite successful simple-expansion engines whose introduction allowed heavier, faster trains on many of the lines. A Wilson Worsdell design, the first of the class raised eyebrows when, contrary to prevailing fashion, he chose a non-compounded layout.

Worsdell also abandoned the long-favored Joy valve gear in favor of Stephenson link with eccentrics placed on the driving axle between the cranks.L&R italicized that location to emphasize how crowded was the arrangement. It left no room for their valves, which had to be located outside and operated by rocker shafts.

They were nicknamed "Rail Crushers" because of their considerably higher weight.


Class Q (Locobase 3522)

Wilson Worsdell scaled back the high-drivered Q1s slightly and came up with this design, which saw service pulling many of the expresses of the era. OS Nock (Locos. of the NER, 1954) comments on the small boiler and large cylinders, speculating that both Worsdell may have taken a leaf out of the book of SW Johnson of the Midland, who so designed his engines "in order to make it virtually impossible for drivers to thrash their engines, and thus work uneconomically."

Brought into the LNER as D17/2


Class Q1/D18 (Locobase 2255)

Data from Ahrons (1927) and Richard Marsden on his LNER Encyclopedia website at [] (27 May 2004). See also "The North Eastern Railway Works", Engineer, Volume 82 (18 December 1896), pp. 607-617.

These engines were built specifically to take up the gauntlet flung down by other railroads during the "Race to the North" in 1895. Timings for the run from London to Aberdeen had come down from 12 hours to 8 2/3 hours. Wilson Worsdell took a standard design and stood it on 91 1/4" drivers.

Cooler heads prevailed for fear of a catastrophic derailment and the 1896 "race" wasn't run. As a result, only two of these tall-drivered Q1s were completed. Engineer's long report on the Gateshead works proclaimed fulsomely: "Taken altogether, we do not hesitate to say this engine will rank with the finest locomotives ever constructed, and that it will maintain the reputation of English designers of locomotives against all comers."

Despite their novelty, however, the basic design was sound and they ran until 1930, coming into the LNER as D18.

Richard Marsden cited an example of their running: "A favourite turn was the Newcastle-Sheffield express, which had a remarkable scheduled start-to-stop timing of 43 minutes for the 44 1/4 miles (71 km) from Darlington to York, at 61.7 mph (98 kph) the fastest in the world at the time, speeds in excess of 80 mph (128 kph) were needed to keep time."


Class R (Locobase 2256)

Data from Ahrons (1927), supplemented by J C Whitridge, Modern Locomotives (New York: Railroad Gazette, 1900), No. 367, A T Taylor, Modern British Locomotives (London: E & FN Spon, Ltd, 1907), p. 13, and W J Barker, "Notes on North Eastern Railway Engines", Locomotive, Volume XXVI [26] (15 November 1920], p. 240-241

Significantly larger 4-4-0 design from Wilson Worsdell than those that had preceded it on the North Eastern. Glover (1967) contends these were "among the most brilliant of the period." They had relatively large, outside-admission piston valves (8 3/4"/222 mm diameter) of W M Smith's patent. Barker wrote in 1920 that these cast-iron valves were located under the cylinders inside, directly driven by the eccentrics. Their design absorbed "only a fraction of the power required for ordinary slide valves."

The class proved reliable and relatively economical of coal. Barnes reported that their run between York and Edinburgh was "as severe as any in England." They had a crowded road to go over (meaning tight schedules to keep), frequent heavy winds to battle, and 250-long ton (275 short ton) trains to pull. They were booked to cover 124.5 miles in 143 minutes (52.2 mph/84.1 kmh).

Barker reported that engine 2011 tested the "working of these [patent] valves and the general wear and tear of the locomotive". Beginning on 26 August 1899, the 2011 ran in regular service until entering the shops for general repair on 12 March 1903. The schedule, kept by two crews headed by drivers Hedley and Blayda, sent the 2011 from Newcastle to Edinburgh (124 1/2 miles/200 km ) nonstop at an average speed of 51 mph (82 kph). The 2011 returned to Newcastle with the Scotsman in the same morning. From there it went to Leeds, returning after a 35 minute layover in Leads.

In almost four years, it accumulated 284,142 miles (457,469 km). At about the halfway point on 31 December 1901, the valves were pulled and showed no "appreciable wear in the valves or valve motion." They were sesnt off to the valve makers for examination. Barker's table on p. 241 shows that the other engines were worked at similar rates.

30 more were delivered in 1906-1907.

They were later modified to have 1,120 sq ft evaporative, 306 sq ft superheat surfaces, a relatively high superheat ratio of 21.4% (Locobase 3528).


Class R - superheated / D20 (Locobase 3528)

Data from Richard Marsden, "The W.Worsdell Class D20 (NER Class R) 4-4-0 Locomotives" on his LNER Encyclopedia website at [], last accessed 5 December 2020.

As part of the North Eastern's wartime effort to boost performance, these engines were altered as shown. Given that little overall change in heating surface area resulted, these must have been a very satisfactory alteration in terms of economy. Later designated D20 in LNER service.


Class R1 - superheated / D21 (Locobase 3529)

Richard Marsden's online LNER Encyclopedia ([], accessed 4 March 2006).

Superheated as part of a railway-effort to increase wartime output per engine, these engines were more radically altered than the earlier Rs. As with most of the others, the added superheat area is generous in proportion..


Class R1 / D21 (Locobase 2283)

Data from Ahrons (1927).

Glover (1967) contends these engines represented "the highest state of development to which the 4-4-0 type of express engine was brought during the Edwardian era." OS Nock comments that the valve motion settings indicate engines designed to run hard with the heaviest trains rather than to post high speeds with light trains. The took the York -Edinburgh, 400-ton trains easily.

In the LNER they were Class D21 and served until 1942-1946.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Middle Run Media

Class1492/381619 - 2-cylinder compound3CC Smith compound/D19Class M/Q - superheatedF - compound
Locobase ID2232 20139 2231 3527 3540
RailroadNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth Eastern
CountryGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat Britain
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class281125
Road Numbers161916191620
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built281125
BuilderseveralGatesheadGatesheadNENE
Year18841895189819151887
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephensonJoy
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 8.33 / 2.54 9.25 / 2.82 9.25 / 2.82 9.25 / 2.82 8.66 / 2.64
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)20.87 / 6.3623.50 / 7.1623.50 / 7.1623.50 / 7.1621.92 / 6.68
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.40 0.39 0.39 0.39 0.40
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)41.52 / 12.6645.73 / 13.94
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)38,864 / 17,628
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)61,152 / 27,73879,520 / 36,07079,520 / 36,07071,680 / 32,514
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)88,480 / 40,134118,720 / 53,851118,720 / 53,851106,512 / 48,313
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)62,720 / 28,44989,600 / 40,64286,800 / 39,37277,056 / 34,952
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)151,200 / 68,583208,320 / 94,493205,520 / 93,223183,568 / 83,265
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3000 / 11.364728 / 17.913645 / 13.81
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT)5 / 55 / 5
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)51 / 25.5066 / 3366 / 3360 / 30
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)80.25 / 203885 / 215985 / 215985 / 215980.50 / 2045
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)140 / 9.70175 / 12.10200 / 13.80180 / 12.40175 / 12.10
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)17" x 24" / 432x61020" x 24" / 508x610 (1)19" x 26" / 483x660 (1)19" x 26" / 483x66018" x 24" / 457x610 (1)
Low Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)28" x 24" / 711x610 (1)20" x 24" / 508x61026" x 24" / 660x610 (1)
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)10,285 / 4665.2011,124 / 5045.7714,238 / 6458.2616,895 / 7663.459713 / 4405.75
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.95 7.15 5.59 7.38
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)193 - 1.75" / 44225 - 1.75" / 44234 - 1.75" / 4489 - 1.75" / 44242 - 1.75" / 44
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)18 - 5.25" / 133
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)10.58 / 3.2211.83 / 3.6111 / 3.3511 / 3.35
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)104.50 / 9.71121 / 11.24152.70 / 14.19123 / 11.43112 / 10.41
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)16.90 / 1.5719.50 / 1.8123 / 2.1419.80 / 1.8417.33 / 1.61
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1040 / 96.621341 / 124.581329 / 123.47893 / 82.991323 / 122.91
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)204 / 18.96
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1040 / 96.621341 / 124.581329 / 123.471097 / 101.951323 / 122.91
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume164.95307.33311.53104.66374.33
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation23663413460035643033
Same as above plus superheater percentage23663413460042413033
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area14,63021,17530,54026,34719,600
Power L146405641679499945996
Power MT334.56312.78376.71368.83

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Middle Run Media

ClassF - simpled/superheated - D22F1 / D22G conversion / D23Ginx BabiesM1// D17/1
Locobase ID3542 3543 7478 2990 2254
RailroadNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth Eastern
CountryGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat Britain
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class37201020
Road Numbers12691620-1639
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built101020
BuilderNENEGatesheadDarlingtonGateshead
Year19151887191318721893
Valve GearStephensonJoyStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 8.66 / 2.64 8.66 / 2.64 7.29 / 2.22 9.25 / 2.82
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)21.92 / 6.6821.92 / 6.6821.04 / 6.4123.50 / 7.16
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.40 0.40 0.35 0.39
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)38,864 / 17,62838,864 / 17,62834,272 / 15,546
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)71,680 / 32,51471,680 / 32,51461,624 / 27,95275,488 / 34,241
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)106,512 / 48,313106,512 / 48,31399,680 / 45,21498,672 / 44,757113,568 / 51,514
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)60 / 3060 / 3051 / 25.5063 / 31.50
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)80.50 / 204580.50 / 204573.25 / 186284 / 213485 / 2159
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)170 / 11.70170 / 11.70160 / 11140 / 9.70180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61018" x 24" / 457x61017" x 30" / 432x76219" x 26" / 483x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)13,958 / 6331.2513,958 / 6331.2514,437 / 6548.5212,283 / 5571.4816,895 / 7663.45
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 5.14 5.14 5.02 4.47
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)105 - 1.75" / 44242 - 1.75" / 4496 - 1.75" / 44210 - 1.75" / 44225 - 1.75" / 44
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)18 - 5.25" / 13318 - 5.25" / 133
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)10.94 / 3.3311.90
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)112 / 10.41112 / 10.4198 / 9.11121 / 11.25
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)17.33 / 1.6117.33 / 1.6115.60 / 1.4519.60 / 1.82
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)907 / 84.291323 / 122.96826 / 76.771217 / 113.101341 / 124.63
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)185 / 17.19175 / 16.26
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1092 / 101.481323 / 122.961001 / 93.031217 / 113.101341 / 124.63
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume128.31187.17116.86154.42157.17
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation2946294624963528
Same as above plus superheater percentage3447294629203528
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area22,27719,04018,34621,780
Power L110,106607679895816
Power MT621.65373.75339.71

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Middle Run Media

ClassQQ1/D18RR - superheated / D20R1 - superheated / D21
Locobase ID3522 2255 2256 3528 3529
RailroadNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth EasternNorth Eastern
CountryGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat BritainGreat Britain
Whyte4-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-04-4-0
Number in Class30260
Road Numbers18711869-187020112011
GaugeStdStdStdStdStd
Number Built30260
BuilderNEGatesheadNENEDarlington
Year18951895189919151915
Valve GearStephensonStephensonStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 9.50 / 2.90 9.50 / 2.90 9.50 / 2.90 9.50 / 2.90 9.50 / 2.90
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)23.75 / 7.2423.75 / 7.2423.75 / 7.2423.75 / 7.2424.75 / 7.54
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)56.25 / 17.1456.25 / 17.1446.24 / 14.0945.90
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)42,560 / 19,30544,016 / 19,96544,352 / 20,118
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)77,056 / 34,95278,960 / 35,81678,960 / 35,81694,080 / 42,674
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)113,792 / 51,615115,808 / 52,530115,808 / 52,530133,280 / 60,455
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)74,592 / 33,83484,896 / 38,508
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)188,384 / 85,449200,704 / 91,038
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)4800 / 18.184800 / 18.184244 / 16.08
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 5.60 / 5 5.60 / 5.10 5.50 / 5
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)64 / 3266 / 3366 / 3378 / 39
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)85 / 215991.25 / 231882 / 208382 / 208382 / 2083
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40175 / 12.10200 / 13.80200 / 13.80225 / 15.50
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19.5" x 26" / 495x66020" x 26" / 508x66019" x 26" / 483x66019" x 26" / 483x66019" x 26" / 483x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)17,796 / 8072.1416,953 / 7689.7619,459 / 8826.4619,459 / 8826.4621,891 / 9929.60
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.55 4.06 4.06 4.30
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)201 - 1.75" / 44255 - 1.75" / 44126 - 1.75" / 4490 - 2" / 51
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)18 - 5.25" / 13324 - 5.25" / 133
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)11.84 / 3.6111.83 / 3.6111.83 / 3.6111.26 / 3.43
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)123 / 11.43127 / 11.80144 / 13.38139 / 12.92158 / 14.68
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)19.75 / 1.8420.75 / 1.9320 / 1.8620 / 1.8627 / 2.51
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1212 / 112.641217 / 113.061521 / 141.301120 / 104.091059 / 98.42
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)204 / 18.96258 / 23.98
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1212 / 112.641217 / 113.061521 / 141.301324 / 123.051317 / 122.40
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume134.86128.73178.27131.27124.12
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation35553631400040006075
Same as above plus superheater percentage35553631400046007290
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area22,14022,22528,80031,97042,660
Power L151845214717911,69615,032
Power MT298.35400.89653.12704.50

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Middle Run Media

ClassR1 / D21
Locobase ID2283
RailroadNorth Eastern
CountryGreat Britain
Whyte4-4-0
Number in Class10
Road Numbers
GaugeStd
Number Built10
BuilderDarlington
Year1908
Valve Gear
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m) 9.50 / 2.90
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)24.75 / 7.54
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase 0.38
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)94,080 / 42,674
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)133,280 / 60,455
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT)
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)78 / 39
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)82 / 2083
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)225 / 15.50
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)19" x 26" / 483x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)21,891 / 9929.60
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.30
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)254 - 2" / 51
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)11.26 / 3.43
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)158 / 14.68
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)27 / 2.51
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1737 / 161.43
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1737 / 161.43
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume203.58
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation6075
Same as above plus superheater percentage6075
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area35,550
Power L19107
Power MT426.82

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