Unspecified 0-6-0 Locomotives in India


Class Details by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media

Class BESA/SG (1903) (Locobase 4244)

Data from [] (accessed 24 June 2007) and from [] (30 June 2003). See also Leslie S Robertson, Secretary, Report of the Locomotive Committee on Standard Locomotives for Indian Railways (London: Crosby Lockwood & Son, 2nd Ed, November 1905); and Cyril Hitchcock, "The Standardisation of Locomotives in India, 1910", Engineer, Volume 110 (28 October 1910), pp. 475; The Engineer's editors presented an emphatic dismissal of the notion of standarisation of types (e.g.: "Standard Goods", "Atlantic Passenger") in the same issue at p. 468. A rebuttal by "LS" appeared in the 11 November 1910 Engineer at p. 511.

British Engineering Standards Association version of the Standard Goods six-coupled freight engine already in widespread use in India. North British, Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns, & Vulcan Foundry. The latter delivered 50 to the North West of India and the Oudh & Rohilkund Railways.

The standard Belpaire boiler came in two sizes -- this was the smaller one. The boiler was used with 2-6-4T and 4-4-0 designs as well (which see).

See the HP 4-6-0 for full description of the BESA intention and varying views of its utility.

In the case of the 0-6-0 goods engines, "LS", who identified himself as a "district officer and works manager" on an Indian railway quite liked the 4-6-0 design, wrote that he was "in favour of standardisation." Yet he also wrote that he'd scrap the 0-6-0 and 4-4-0 design as "obsolete and useless." He especially disliked the 4-4-0s. Of the 0-6-0s, he wrote that the goods engine was better than the 4-4-0 on heavy passenger work, "and are constantly abused by being run at speeds beyond their capacity."

Dr Sundar, if he knew about this claim, would disagree. He wrote that "these proved to be "useful and efficient ...able to haul 1,450-ton goods trains at 16-18 mph." Their relatively tall drivers permitted trailing 25-20 troop-carrying cars at 30 mph [48 kph].


Class BESA/SG (1910) (Locobase 4245)

Data from "The Work of the British Engineering Standards Association as Applied to Locomotives and Rolling Stock: The Standardization of Locomotives for Indian Railways", Locomotive Magazine, Volume XXV [25] (15 August 1919), pp. 120-123. See also Cyril Hitchcock, "The Standardisation of Locomotives in India, 1910", Engineer, Volume 110 (28 October 1910), pp. 475; The Engineer's editors presented an emphatic dismissal of the notion of standarisation of types (e.g.: "Standard Goods", "Atlantic Passenger") in the same issue at p. 468. A rebuttal by "LS" appeared in the 11 November 1910 Engineer at p. 511.

British Engineering Standards Association Standard Goodgs six-coupled freight engine. The standard Belpaire boiler came in two sizes -- this was the larger one. The earlier version was designed for the permitted axle loads at the time. When much of the system was upgraded with heavier rail and permanent way, the BESA standard now used a larger boiler as shown in the specs.

The boiler was used with 2-6-4T and 4-4-0 designs as well (which see).

See the HP 4-6-0 for full description of the BESA intention and varying views of its utility.

Principal Dimensions by Steve Llanso of Middle Run Media

ClassBESA/SG (1903)BESA/SG (1910)
Locobase ID4244 4245
Railroad
CountryIndiaIndia
Whyte0-6-00-6-0
Number in Class486
Road Numbers
Gauge5'6"5'6"
Number Built486
Builderseveral
Year19031910
Valve GearStephensonStephenson
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase (ft / m)15.25 / 4.6515.50 / 4.72
Engine Wheelbase (ft / m)15.25 / 4.6515.50 / 4.72
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheelbase11
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender) (ft / m)38.36 / 11.69
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle) (lbs / kg)37,520 / 17,01938,976 / 17,679
Weight on Drivers (lbs / kg)107,250 / 48,648115,360 / 52,326
Engine Weight (lbs / kg)107,250 / 48,648115,360 / 52,326
Tender Loaded Weight (lbs / kg)87,920 / 39,88090,720 / 41,150
Total Engine and Tender Weight (lbs / kg)195,170 / 88,528206,080 / 93,476
Tender Water Capacity (gals / ML)3600 / 13.643600 / 13.64
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal) (gals/tons / Liters/MT) 8.40 / 8 8.25 / 8
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) (lb/yd / kg/m)60 / 3064 / 32
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter (in / mm)61.50 / 156261.50 / 1562
Boiler Pressure (psi / kPa)180 / 12.40180 / 12.40
High Pressure Cylinders (dia x stroke) (in / mm)18.5" x 26" / 470x66018.5" x 26" / 470x660
Tractive Effort (lbs / kg)22,138 / 10041.6422,138 / 10041.64
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.84 5.21
Heating Ability
Tubes (number - dia) (in / mm)236 - 1.75" / 44279 - 1.75" / 44
Flues (number - dia) (in / mm)
Flue/Tube length (ft / m)11.37 / 3.4711.37 / 3.47
Firebox Area (sq ft / m2)120 / 11.15150 / 13.94
Grate Area (sq ft / m2)25.30 / 2.3527 / 2.51
Evaporative Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1350 / 125.421603 / 148.92
Superheating Surface (sq ft / m2)
Combined Heating Surface (sq ft / m2)1350 / 125.421603 / 148.92
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume166.89198.17
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation45544860
Same as above plus superheater percentage45544860
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area21,60027,000
Power L144485367
Power MT274.30307.70

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