New York Central / Big Four / Michigan Central / Lake Shore & Michigan Southern / Pittsburgh & Lake Erie / Peoria & Eastern / Boston & Albany 4-6-2 "Pacific" Type Locomotives

Introduction

The New York Central system included several railroads that operated under their own identity. Among these roads were the Boston & Albany Railroad, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis Railroad, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad, the Michigan Central Railroad, which also controlled the Canadian Southern Railway, the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad and the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad. These railroad are mentioned here because these were the roads that used "Pacific" type locomotives. See below for the NYC&HR locomotives and elsewhere for the other lines.

The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad had a total of 478 "Pacific" type locomotives, which were acquired between 1908 and January 1927. These locomotives were built in five major Classes with twenty-five different sub classes. The American Locomotive Company built 418 of the locomotives, the Baldwin Locomotive Works built fifty and the NYC built ten.

Between 1908 and 1913 the NYC&HR took delivery of 377 "Pacific" type locomotives of four major classes. Class K-2 which had 79" diameter drivers, 22" x 28" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 29,100 pounds of tractive effort. Class K-3 which had 79" diameter drivers, 23 1/2 " x 28" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 30,900 pounds of tractive effort. Class K-10 which had 69" diameter drivers, 24" x 28" cylinders, a 200 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 39,735 pounds of tractive effort. Class K-11 which had 69" diameter drivers, 26" x 26" cylinders, a 180 psi boiler pressure and they exerted 38,970 pounds of tractive effort.

In 1908, the NYC&HR took delivery of sixty "Pacific" type locomotives, which were all built by the American Locomotive Company. Forty of these locomotives were designated as Class K-2e and assigned road numbers 3555 through 3594. Ten were designated as Class K-2f and assigned road numbers 3450 through 3459. Five were designated as Class K-2g and assigned road numbers 3460 through 3464 and another five were designated as Class K-2h and assigned road numbers 3465 through 3469.

In 1910, another forty-five "Pacific" type locomotives were added to the roster, which were all built by ALCO. Twenty-four of these locomotives were designated as Class K-2i and assigned road numbers 3470 through 3493. A single locomotive designated as Class K-2j was assigned road number 3494. Twelve were designated as Class K-2k and assigned road numbers 3438 through 3449. There were eight designated as Class K-10a, which were assigned road numbers 3000 through 3003 and road numbers 3026 through 3029.

In 1911, the NYC&HR received a total of 108 "Pacifics". Twenty came from ALCO and were designated Class K-3a and given road numbers 3418 through 3437. Forty-two locomotives built by ALCO were designated as Class K-10a and assigned road numbers 3004 through 3025 and 3030 through 3049. Ten ALCO-built 4-6-2s were designated as Class K-11a and given road numbers 3090 through 3099. Ten more ALCO-built "Pacifics" were designated as Class K-11b and assigned road numbers 3080 through 3089. There were also twenty-six more 4-6-2s delivered in 1911, which were built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works. They were designated as Class K-11c and assigned road numbers 3050 through 3071 and 3073 through 3076.

In 1912, a total of 114 "Pacific" type locomotives were put on the NYC&HR roster. Twenty, which were built by Baldwin were designated as Class K-3c and given road numbers 3398 through 3417. Twenty ALCO-built were designated as Class K-3d and assigned road numbers 3378 through 3397. Another twenty ALCO-built 4-6-2s were designated as Class K-11b and given road numbers 3100 through 3119. Baldwin delivered four locomotives, which were designated as Class K-11c and they were given road numbers 3072, 3077, 3078 and 3079. ALCO delivered twenty locomotives, which were designated as Class K-11d and these locomotives carried road numbers 3120 through 3139. Another thirty ALCO-built "Pacific" were designated as Class K-11e and assigned road numbers 3140 through 3169.

In 1913, fifty ALCO-built locomotives came to the NYC&HR. Twenty were designated as Class K-3g with road numbers 3358 through 3377. Thirty were designated as Class K-11f with road numbers 3170 through 3199.

In 1914, the New York Central Railroad was formed with merger of the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad and the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern along with the inclusion of the Ohio Central Lines.

There were another ninety-one "Pacifics" delivered to the NYC after 1914. Thirty-five ALCO-built 4-6-2s delivered in 1918. This group was designated as Class K-3n and assigned road numbers 3323 through 3357. Twenty-six more locomotives were delivered in 1920. They were designated as Class K-3p and carried road numbers 3297 through 3322. ALCO delivered the last group of new "Pacifics", to be added to the NYC roster in 1927. This group of thirty locomotives was designated as Class K-3q and road numbers 3267 through 3296 were assigned.

In 1924 and 1925, the NYC rebuilt ten of it "Pacific" type locomotives. One, Class K-11f number 3174, was rebuilt in 1924 and reclassified as Class K-14f. Three, Class K-10a numbers 3000, 3009 and 3011 were rebuilt in 1925 and reclassified as Class K-14a, One, Class K-11c number 3052, was rebuilt in 1925 and reclassified as Class K-14c. Two, Class K-11e numbers 3159 and 3165, were rebuilt in 1925 and reclassified as Class K-14e. Three, Class K-11f numbers 3183, 3191 and 3193, were rebuilt in 1925 and reclassified as Class K-14f.

There are no surviving NYC&HR 4-6-2 "Pacific" type locomotives.

Class Details by Steve Llanso

Class K (Locobase 5295)

The data comes from a reproduction of the New York Central's 1902 Locomotive guide found on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/ncy-lbp208A.gif (visited December 2002).

Conveniently, the guide shows the first Pacifics to be built for the NYC&HR, although K-1s appeared in the same year. One can see the great increase in boiler heating surface made available by stretching the boiler over another axle. What remained to be done was superheating the design, which was undertaken in a very few years.

These were later renumbered 514-518 and ran on the Boston & Albany.

Class K-11B/D/E/F (Locobase 13885)

Data from NYC 8 1917 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Brooks may have produced the first 10 new-build perfect-square Pacifics (cylinder diameter equal to the bore) as K-11A (Locobase 5578) and Baldwin may have added the next 30 as K-11C (Locobase 13884), but Schenectady produced the majority of this large class.

K-11s were essentially the same design as the K-3, but had shorter tubes, put less weight on the rails and had much smaller drivers. A few were fitted with boosters and those engines had 25" x 26" cylinders using 200-psi steam for a 40,040-lb tractive effort assisted by an 11,000-lb booster at starting. It's not clear from the 1930 diagrams how many K-11s were boosted, but at that point only a few were so fitted.

Fourteen K-11s were converted by Beech Grove shops, the principal difference being the installation of 72" drivers. These were then classed K-14s.

Class K-11a (Locobase 5578)

Data from NYC 8 1917 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

The K-11a was essentially the same design as the K-3, but had shorter tubes, put less weight on the rails and had much smaller drivers. 50 entered service as K-10s built by Brooks, but were converted. The last 10 were supplied by Brooks in 1911-1913. Notice the unusually "square" cylinders in which diameter is equal to stroke.

A few were fitted with boosters and those engines had 25" x 26" cylinders using 200-psi steam for a 40,040-lb tractive effort assisted by an 11,000-lb booster at starting. It's not clear from the 1930 diagrams how many K-11s were boosted, but at that point only a few were so fitted.

Fourteen K-11s were converted by Beech Grove shops, the principal difference being the installation of 72" drivers. These were then classed K-14s.

Class K-11c (Locobase 13884)

Data from Baldwin Locomotive Works Specification for Engines as digitized by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University, Volume 40, pp. 55-68 and NYC 8 1917 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Works numbers were 37260-37267, 37354-37359, 37360-37375 in November 1911.

As the Michigan Central stocked up (Locobase 5578) on these perfectly square Pacifics (in which the cylinder diameter equalled its stroke), Baldwin unaccountably was called on to deliver 30 to the New York Central itself.

Even more remarkably, the Philadelphians served the railroad until the late 1940s-early 1950s in most cases.

Class K-2 (Locobase 8910)

Data from "4-6-2 'Pacific' Engine; Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad", Railway Engineer, April 1908, pp. 121-123 notes both versions of this new design.

The first 22 were delivered with the boilers shown in this entry. 3 others were fitted with combustion chambers (see Locobase 8911). The RE article notes the high ratio of heating surface area to cylinder volume and observes that that value and the relatively low boiler demand figure (549) "indicate that these engines have a large boiler capacity for high speed sustained for long periods."

In fact, they note, "A careful comparison of the ratios of the two types will also show that especial care has been taken in the design of the "Pacific" engines to provide the same satisfactory proportion between boiler and cylinder capacity as were obtained in the 'Prairie' type engine."

A look at the steam-distribution machinery considers the arrangement of the Walschaert valve gear, "which is similar to that employed on the "Pacific'' locomotive built lor the Pennsylvania R. by the American Locomotive Co. The link is located just behind the centre of the forward driving wheels and is supported on a steel casting outside of the driving wheels, which extends between the guide yoke and the frame cross stay between the first and second pair of driving wheels. The reversing shaft is supported on the back end of this same casting and the reverse shaft arm is directly connected to the radius bar by means of a slip joint."

Locobase realizes that this arrangement is evident on many other engines of the time and later.

All were later superheated; see Locobase 5549.

Class K-2 - combustion chamber (Locobase 8911)

Railway Engineer, April 1908, pp. 121-123 notes both versions of this new design. 22 of the locomotives were supplied with a big, conventional boiler (see Locobase 8910). The 3 shown in this entry were delivered with a combustion chamber that reduced the length of the firetubes by 2 ft, but increased direct heating surface considerably.

Class K-2a/K-2d- superheated (Locobase 5549)

Data from NYC 8 - 1917 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

These Pacifics were delivered to the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern in several batches from 1907 to 1910 (See Locobases 8910-8911) for two of the designs). Their upgrade came soon after service entry and involved a superheater installation that contributed to an significant increase in combined heating surface area. Like the very similar K-2b/c/l updates (Locobase 9401) for the New York Central parent, these were served by 14" piston valves.

According to the 1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003), most of the 84 still on the books in 1930 had trailing-truck boosters fitted for additional starting tractive effort.

Class K-2b/K-2c/K-2l - superheated (Locobase 9401)

Data from NYC 8 - 1917 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Like the rest of the New York Central System's Pacifics, these engines were superheated within a few years of its original delivery of a quintet in 1907 and 50 more in 1910. (These deliveries came at the same time as shipment of identical locomotives to the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (Locobase 8910-8911).

An unusual outcome to what would be a common upgrade, superheating the original K-2b/c/l boiler actually resulted in an increase in the overall heating surface. Piston valves measuring 14" in diameter distributed steam freely and clearly the NYC was well outfitted with light Pacific express power.

Class K-2e (Locobase 4204)

These were described by Railroad Age Gazette (3 April 1908) as duplicates of the 1907 Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Pacifics. RAG took special notice of the generous proportions of the boiler in relation to the cylinder volume. The article also commented on the narrowing space available for the dome above ever-growing boilers and tall drivers. After noting that the design showed no "especial novelties", RAG concluded that the "interest in it lies, for the most part, in its size, the smoothness of its lines, and the pleasing symmetry of its proportions."

Class K-2e/K-2k - superheated (Locobase 5550)

The original, saturated-steam K-2es built for the NYC are described in Locobase 4204. This entry shows the impact of superheating on this group. They differed from the LS&MS engines described in Locobase 5549 chiefly in having boiler tubes that were 1 1/2 feet shorter.

According to the 1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003), unlike the LS&MS engines, most of 77 engines of this group still in use did not have boosters fitted. When they were so equipped, the weight on the drivers and the total engine weight were as on the LS&MS locomotives.

Class K-3a/c/d/g (Locobase 7583)

Data from reproduction of 1913 Alco Bulletin 1016 on Richard Leonard's http://www.railarchive.net/alcopacifics/index.html (accessed 16 June 2006) and NYC 8 1917 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection and the DeGolyer, Volume 40, pp. 41-54.

This series of superheated K-3s entered service from 1910 to 1924; . All had 14" piston valves. Alco-Schenectady and Baldwin shared the first 80-engine order (1911-1913) for the NYC&HR subsidiary. Alco produced 20 K-3a (road # 3418-3437) in February 1911 and 20 K-3d in August 1912 (road numbers 3378-3397). Baldwin followed with 20 K-3cs were produced in 3 batches in January 1913 (works #37423-37432, 37468-37472, and 37491-37495) and bearing road numbers 3398-3417). Alco then wrapped up the NY & HR K-3s with 20 more in September 1913, road numbers 3358-3377. Locobase chooses not to explain (if he knew) why the road number groups decreased numerically as the alphabetic suffix increased.

Alco's Bulletin gave a value of 765 sq ft for the superheater and the Baldwin specs suggested 962 sq ft, but only a few years later, the New York Central's own diagrams showed the 823 sq ft recorded in Locobase's details.

See Locobase 154 for the later K-3s.

Class K-3b (Locobase 5576)

A small segment of the long string of K-3 subclasses that ran all over the NYC system -- these for the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern. The design's only significant difference from the others was the number of small tubes and large flues and, consequently, a smaller superheat ratio than most of the rest of the class. All K-3s had 14" piston valves.

1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003),

Class K-3e (Locobase 5577)

A quintet of follow-ons to the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern's K-3bs. Everything was the same except for a decrease in the number of small tubes (from 242) caused by a 4-tube increase in superheater flues. The result is a small increase in the superheater's contribution to overall heating surface. All had 14" piston valves.

1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003).

Class K-3f/h/i/m (Locobase 5399)

This record uses data from http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/steam-462-specs.htm, visited 15 February 2003, and the 1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003),to show a different tube/flue layout than the K-3s shown in 154.

In this variant, the number of fire tubes was greater, but the diameter smaller. However, superheater areas in NYC Pacifics were not consistently measured among subsidiaries

All had 14" piston valves. Apparently that's the way the Michigan Southern/Canada Southern wanted it

Class K-3n (Locobase 154)

This series of superheated K-3s entered service from 1910 to 1924. All had 14" piston valves. See Locobase 7583 for the earlier K-3d/f.

K-3n, p, q numbered 91 engines from Schenectady & Brooks from 1918-1923. It is this subclass -- weights from table in 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia -- that the data describes.

As of the 1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003), 168 K-3 locomotives had the specified heating surface areas and numbers of tubes and flues shown in this entry.

The Big Four (CCC&StL) received 50 engines in classes K-3j-p (45) and K-3r (5) from 1917 to 1925. The K-3rs had 3 sq ft less of arch tubes in the firebox.

Fitted with 9,700-lb booster on trailing truck to increase starting TE. Indicated horsepower at 45 mph was 2,100 hp; drawbar horsepower at 40 mph was 1,720.

Class K-3p/q (Locobase 9402)

This series of superheated K-3s entered service from 1910 to 1924. All had 14" piston valves. See Locobase 7583 for the earlier K-3d/f.

As of the 1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003), 168 K-3 locomotives had the specified heating surface areas and numbers of tubes and flues shown in this entry.

The Big Four (CCC&StL) received 50 engines in classes K-3j-p (45) and K-3r (5) from 1917 to 1925. The K-3rs had 3 sq ft less of arch tubes in the firebox.

Fitted with 9,700-lb booster on trailing truck to increase starting TE. Indicated horsepower at 45 mph was 2,100 hp; drawbar horsepower at 40 mph was 1,720.

Class K-41a (Locobase 5579)

These were one of two classes created from converted J-41 Prairies 2-6-2). The grate and running gear stayed the same while the boiler grew into K-3 dimensions. This group had 2 more superheater flues and 12 fewer firetubes than the K-41b.

Data from 1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003).

Class K-41b (Locobase 5580)

These were one of two classes created from converted J-41 Prairies 2-6-2). The grate and running gear stayed the same while the boiler grew into K-3 dimensions. This group had 2 fewer superheater flues and 12 more firetubes than the K-41a.

Data from 1930 guide to Dimensions and Classifications of Locomotives seen on http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-lb30.html (May 2003).

Class K-4A/K-4B (Locobase 7067)

Data from P&LE-PMcK&Y 3 1-26 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Although similar in size to fellow system railroad K-3 Pacifics from the LS & MS (K-3e) of 1913 and Michigan Central of 1910 (K-3h), the P & LE engines differed in having smaller drivers. They were supplied in two batches, the K-4As (builder's numbers 57432-57436) in April 1917 and the K-4Bs (58083-58087) in January 1918.

Class K-5/K-5a/K-5b (Locobase 155)

Data from 1930 Locomotive Cyclopedia, confirmed by NYC 1 -1946 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Built for Michigan Central (15), the Big Four (10 + later assignment of 16 MC engines), and Pittsburgh and Lake Erie (10). These were the biggest Pacifics in the New York Central system and were the express passenger equivalents of the parent company's Hudsons.

Class K-80 (Locobase 5367)

The data comes from a table in June 1906 AERJ.

These Pacifics were very similar to the class Ks of the parent New York Central, but were built with more and smaller firetubes. They were delivered to the MC over an 8-year period.

Class K-80 - late (Locobase 7589)

Data from reproduction of 1913 Alco Bulletin 1016 on Richard Leonard's http://www.railarchive.net/alcopacifics/index.html (accessed 16 June 2006).

In Locobase 5367, we noted that this class was delivered to the MC over a nine-year period. As it happened, that time span included the widespread adoption of superheaters to US locomotives. By the end of production, then, the boiler had been modified to include a superheater and a direct comparison between "early" and "late" is possible.

Class K/Kb - original (Locobase 9760)

Data from CCC&StL - 3 - 1914 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection. Also see C H Voges, "Good Record", Railway & Locomotive Engineering, Vol 23, No 4 (April 1910), p. 144.

Based on the New York Central's K class of saturated Pacifics, this string of K classes for the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis was produced first in December 1905 as similar engines. Class K consisted of 10 Brooks-built engines with road numbers 6400-6409 and 10 more Kb followed in June 1906 as 6410-6419. After a three-year break, Schenectady built 5 Kf in July 1909 and 6 Kh in March 1910 and 4 Kh in April 1911; this brought the road number series up to 6434. Kk - 10 engines - completed the class in June 1912.

Voges' letter detailing the reliability of K-class number 6416 demonstrate what levels of regular operations were possible on a well-nourished main-line like the Central's Big Four: "This engine has made 200,581 miles without repairs; no new flues and without having tires turned (Railway Steel Spring Co.'s tires), only receiving light running repairs in the round-house between trips. The engine left the Bellefontaine shop on Nov. 20, 1907 and returned for general repairs Dec. I", 1909. It hauled nine heavy express cars a day, running 288 miles at an average speed of 55 miles per hour. In the two years' time this engine had no failures of any kind."

They were all later superheated; see Locobase 9406.

Class K/Kb/Kf/Kh/Kk (Locobase 9406)

The data NYC 1 - 1946 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Not long after the 35 locomotives of the K through KH classes had been delivered, Brooks delivered 10 Kk as superheated locomotives and soon modified the earlier, saturated K locomotives to the same configuration. They retained the 12" piston valves and Walschaert radial valve gear.

Class KJ/KL/KM (Locobase 9405)

The data NYC 1 - 1946 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Locobase 5295 describes the original K-series that introduced the 4-6-2 arrangement to the New York Central in 1903. Only the 1946 book (that is, not the 1917, 1926, and 1930 editions) shows the Kj/Kl/Km superheated version of the K series that was produced for the B & A in March 1911 (Kj - 551-554), December 1912 (Kl - 555-559), and December 1913-January 1914 (Km - 560-565).

Class Kf/Kh - original (Locobase 9761)

Data from CCC&StL - 3 - 1914 supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Based on the New York Central's K class of saturated Pacifics, this string of K classes for the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis was produced first in December 1905 as similar engines; see Locobase 9760. After a three-year break, Schenectady built 5 Kf in July 1909 and 6 Kh in March 1910 and 4 Kh in April 1911; this brought the road number series up to 6434. Kk - 10 engines - completed the class in June 1912.

They were all later superheated; see Locobase 9406.

Class Ko (Locobase 9407)

The data NYC 1 - 1946 Locomotive Diagrams supplied in May 2005 by Allen Stanley from his extensive collection.

Based on the New York Central's K class of saturated Pacifics, this pair was built for the P & E with superheaters in November 1915. By that time, the P & E was part of the Big Four, which had superheated Ks of its own; see Locobase 9407.


Specifications by Steve Llanso
ClassKK-11B/D/E/FK-11aK-11cK-2K-2 - combustion chamberK-2a/K-2d- superheatedK-2b/K-2c/K-2l - superheatedK-2eK-2e/K-2k - superheatedK-3a/c/d/gK-3bK-3eK-3f/h/i/mK-3nK-3p/qK-41aK-41bK-4A/K-4BK-5/K-5a/K-5bK-80K-80 - lateK/Kb - originalK/Kb/Kf/Kh/KkKJ/KL/KMKf/Kh - originalKo
Locobase ID5295 13885 5578 13884 8910 8911 5549 9401 4204 5550 7583 5576 5577 5399 154 9402 5579 5580 7067 155 5367 7589 9760 9406 9405 9761 9407
RailroadNew York Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)Michigan Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (NYC)Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (NYC)Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (NYC)New York Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (NYC)Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (NYC)Michigan Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)New York Central (NYC)Pittsburgh & Lake Erie (NYC)New York Central (NYC)Michigan Central (NYC)Michigan Central (NYC)Big Four (NYC)Big Four (NYC)Boston & Albany (NYC)Big Four (NYC)Peoria & Eastern (NYC)
Whyte4-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-24-6-2
Road Numbers2795-27993080-3089, 3100-31993001-3049, 3090-30993050-30794800-4817, 4823-48444818-4822, 4845-48943555-35943555-3594, 3438-34943358-34374895-49044905-49098300-8339, 8400-84043323-33573267-33224701-47234724-349225-92344905-49408450-849184846400-64196400-6444551-5656420-643410-11
GaugeStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStdStd
BuilderAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyseveralBaldwinAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyseveralAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyseveralAlco-BrooksAlcoCollinwoodCollinwoodAlco-SchenectadyAlcoAlco-SchenectadyAlco-SchenectadyNYCNYCNYCNYCAlco-Brooks
Year190319111910191119071907190719071907190719101911191319101918192019161915191719241904191219061912191119091915
Valve GearWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertStephensonWalschaertStephensonWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaertWalschaert
Locomotive Length and Weight
Driver Wheelbase13'12.50'12.50'12.50'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'14'13.67'13'13'13'13'13'13'13'
Engine Wheelbase33.62'34.08'34.08'34.08'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.50'36.92'33.62'33.62'33.62'33.62'33.62'33.62'33.62'
Ratio of driving wheelbase to overall engine wheebase 0.39 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.37 0.39 0.39 0.39 0.39 0.39 0.39 0.39
Overall Wheelbase (engine & tender)59'66.31'66.31'66.31'67.92'67.92'68.06'67.94'67.92'68.08'68'71'71'71'68.25'68.08'68.13'68.13'65.72'79.45'60.42'65.92'64.71'64.71'65.12'64.71'65.12'
Axle Loading (Maximum Weight per Axle)
Weight on Drivers141000 lbs172000 lbs172000 lbs172000 lbs170700 lbs170700 lbs173000 lbs173000 lbs171500 lbs173000 lbs172000 lbs192400 lbs192400 lbs194500 lbs189400 lbs194500 lbs170500 lbs170500 lbs187000 lbs184500 lbs140500 lbs156000 lbs142000 lbs151000 lbs143200 lbs151000 lbs
Engine Weight215000 lbs266000 lbs266000 lbs266000 lbs261500 lbs261500 lbs267800 lbs267800 lbs266000 lbs271500 lbs271000 lbs290200 lbs290200 lbs296500 lbs288800 lbs288000 lbs265000 lbs265000 lbs286700 lbs297500 lbs221000 lbs252500 lbs222800 lbs242000 lbs233000 lbs242000 lbs
Tender Light Weight127000 lbs147500 lbs147500 lbs147500 lbs162200 lbs162200 lbs153200 lbs153200 lbs164000 lbs154700 lbs153700 lbs207000 lbs207000 lbs158200 lbs167600 lbs156500 lbs156500 lbs149000 lbs122600 lbs152300 lbs151000 lbs162000 lbs162000 lbs162000 lbs
Total Engine and Tender Weight342000 lbs413500 lbs413500 lbs413500 lbs423700 lbs423700 lbs421000 lbs421000 lbs430000 lbs426200 lbs424700 lbs497200 lbs497200 lbs447000 lbs455600 lbs421500 lbs421500 lbs435700 lbs343600 lbs404800 lbs373800 lbs404000 lbs395000 lbs404000 lbs
Tender Water Capacity6000 gals7500 gals7500 gals7500 gals8000 gals8000 gals7500 gals7500 gals8000 gals8000 gals7500 gals10000 gals10000 gals10000 gals10000 gals10000 gals7500 gals7500 gals8400 gals15000 gals6000 gals7000 gals7500 gals8000 gals8000 gals7500 gals8000 gals
Tender Fuel Capacity (oil/coal)10 tons10 tons10 tons10 tons14 tons14 tons12 tons12 tons14 tons11 tons12 tons17 tons17 tons16 tons16 tons16 tons12 tons12 tons10 tons16 tons10 tons12 tons12 tons13.5 tons13.5 tons12 tons13.5 tons
Minimum weight of rail (calculated) on which locomotive could run78 lb/yard96 lb/yard96 lb/yard96 lb/yard95 lb/yard95 lb/yard96 lb/yard96 lb/yard95 lb/yard96 lb/yard96 lb/yard107 lb/yard107 lb/yard108 lb/yard105 lb/yard108 lb/yard95 lb/yard95 lb/yard104 lb/yard103 lb/yard78 lb/yard87 lb/yard79 lb/yard84 lb/yard080 lb/yard84 lb/yard
Geometry Relating to Tractive Effort
Driver Diameter75"69"69"69"79"79"79"79"79"79"79"79"79"79"79"79"72"72"72"79"72.50"75"75"75"75"75"75"
Boiler Pressure200 psi180 psi180 psi180 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi205 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi200 psi
Cylinders (dia x stroke)22" x 26"26" x 26"26" x 26"26" x 26"22" x 28"22" x 28"22" x 28"22" x 28"22" x 28"22" x 28"23.5" x 26"23.5" x 26"23.5" x 26"23.5" x 26"23.5" x 26"23.5" x 26"22" x 28"22" x 28"23.5" x 26"25" x 28"22" x 26"22" x 26"22" x 26"22" x 26"22" x 26"22" x 26"22" x 26"
Tractive Effort28524 lbs38973 lbs38973 lbs38973 lbs29163 lbs29163 lbs29163 lbs29163 lbs29163 lbs29163 lbs30898 lbs30898 lbs30898 lbs30898 lbs30898 lbs30898 lbs31998 lbs31998 lbs33902 lbs38600 lbs29507 lbs28524 lbs28524 lbs28524 lbs28524 lbs28524 lbs28524 lbs
Factor of Adhesion (Weight on Drivers/Tractive Effort) 4.94 4.41 4.41 4.41 5.85 5.85 5.93 5.93 5.88 5.93 5.57 6.23 6.23 6.29 6.13 6.29 5.33 5.33 5.52 4.78 4.76 5.47 4.98 5.29 5.02 5.29
Heating Ability
Firebox Area206 sq. ft232.50 sq. ft232.50 sq. ft232.50 sq. ft234.40 sq. ft296.40 sq. ft231.30 sq. ft231.30 sq. ft228.30 sq. ft231 sq. ft231 sq. ft231.30 sq. ft229.40 sq. ft231 sq. ft230 sq. ft231 sq. ft222 sq. ft222 sq. ft229.40 sq. ft257 sq. ft207.10 sq. ft234 sq. ft180 sq. ft207 sq. ft198 sq. ft180 sq. ft201 sq. ft
Grate Area50.20 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.80 sq. ft56.80 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft55 sq. ft55 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft67.80 sq. ft50.23 sq. ft56.50 sq. ft50.20 sq. ft50.20 sq. ft50.20 sq. ft50.20 sq. ft50.20 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface3776 sq. ft3770 sq. ft3770 sq. ft3770 sq. ft4195 sq. ft3409 sq. ft3791 sq. ft3791 sq. ft4210 sq. ft3399 sq. ft3424 sq. ft3791 sq. ft3760 sq. ft3762 sq. ft3422 sq. ft3424 sq. ft3603 sq. ft3671 sq. ft3760 sq. ft3952 sq. ft3898 sq. ft3314 sq. ft3558 sq. ft3121 sq. ft2927 sq. ft3703 sq. ft3098 sq. ft
Superheating Surface775 sq. ft775 sq. ft775 sq. ft724 sq. ft724 sq. ft740 sq. ft823 sq. ft724 sq. ft817 sq. ft893 sq. ft823 sq. ft832 sq. ft766 sq. ft642 sq. ft823 sq. ft1158 sq. ft672 sq. ft650 sq. ft615 sq. ft650 sq. ft
Combined Heating Surface3776 sq. ft4545 sq. ft4545 sq. ft4545 sq. ft4195 sq. ft3409 sq. ft4515 sq. ft4515 sq. ft4210 sq. ft4139 sq. ft4247 sq. ft4515 sq. ft4577 sq. ft4655 sq. ft4245 sq. ft4256 sq. ft4369 sq. ft4313 sq. ft4583 sq. ft5110 sq. ft3898 sq. ft3986 sq. ft3558 sq. ft3771 sq. ft3542 sq. ft3703 sq. ft3748 sq. ft
Evaporative Heating Surface/Cylinder Volume330.09235.96235.96235.96340.53276.72307.73307.73341.75275.91262.33290.45288.07288.23262.18262.33292.47297.99288.07248.43340.76289.71311.04272.83255.88323.71270.82
Computations Relating to Power Output (More Information)
Robert LeMassena's Power Computation100401017010170101701130011300113601136011300113001130011300113001130011300113001100011000113001389910046113001004010040100401004010040
Same as above plus superheater percentage100401189911899118991130011300131781317811300133341344713108133341344713447135601298012650133341709610046132211004011747117471004011747
Same as above but substitute firebox area for grate area412004896548965489654688059280536625366245660545165497853662541385497854740554405239251060541386480341420547563600048438463323600047034
Power L110503154271542715427114721045524504245041143923971241822312824735261352416824346226132057122643265691042323017974321868206571006021752
Power MT492.66593.21593.21593.21444.49405.08936.80936.80441.14916.42929.86795.04850.28888.71843.95827.87877.18797.97800.84952.43490.65975.84453.79957.83464.63952.75

Photos

Reference

Credits

Introduction and roster provided by Richard Duley. Class details and specifications provided by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media.